Roudebush Hall
Roudebush Hall, home of Miami's administrative offices

College of Education, Health and Society

Foundational Goal 3: Cultivate mutually beneficial partnerships and applied and service-oriented projects that strengthen our local, state, national, and world communities.

Objective 1: Partner with educational and other public- and private-sector institutions to co-design academic and outreach programs that enhance access to and support of quality higher education.

Metric 24: Miami’s Oxford campus will double the number of transfer students to 500 students, and Miami regionals will increase by 15% the number of transfer students to 500 students.

Strategies:

  • Explore and sign appropriate articulation agreements with Sinclair Community College and Columbus State Community College as well as other institutions.
  • Identify specific EHS programs for which transfer would work well (e.g., curriculum match and low enrolled programs).
  • Develop a multi-year recruitment and marketing plan for select programs and departments to increase highly qualified transfer applicant pool.
  • Target, increase, and deepen partnerships with two-year institutions with appropriate preparatory programs that are aligned with our target programs (e.g., EDT and FSW).
  • Audit and revise existing policies and practices in targeted programs to decrease barriers for transfer students.
  • Develop a welcome or transition program in EHS (e.g., SAHE graduate assistant to help develop and run) to advise and help EHS transfer students adjust to, and succeed at, Miami (e.g., through a peer mentoring program in which the student is matched with senior of same major).

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Finding the staff resources and time for advising and supporting transfer students
  • Encouraging transfer enrollments while maintaining professional accreditation standards and high quality academic programs.

Metric 25: Miami will double the number of partnerships with high schools, community-based organizations, foundations, and other entities to expand the recruitment of talented, diverse college-bound students, e.g., through expansion of the Oxford Pathway Program, articulation agreements, dual enrollment/PSEO, tutoring or mentoring programs, bridge and summer programs.

Strategies:

  • Collaborate with educational service centers and school superintendents to explore dual enrollment and PSEO options with schools in Butler County and Mercer County to offer online versions of Transfer Assurance Guide (TAG) courses (e.g., FSW/EDT 225, Family, Community and Schools; FSW281, Child Development; and EDT190, Introduction to Teacher Education).
  • Participate in the Summer Scholars Program through exciting modules related to EHS topics (e.g., Pathways to the Helping Professions; The Art of Game Design; Navigating the Dynamics of Nutrition and Dietetics, and The Business of Sport: The Real World of Sports Management).  
  • Continue active faculty and student involvement in the BRIDGES program.
  • Continue to support and enhance the Teacher Academy Program which enables EHS faculty to work with area high schools to recruit college bound students.
  • Support and sustain the reading clinic and mentoring program for local public school students who need additional support in this area.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Competing with other Ohio public institutions for dual enrollment students given the comparatively higher tuition costs on the Oxford campus and the fact that other institutions enjoy a much longer history with dual enrollment courses and serving high schools in this capacity
  • Recruiting high school students to enroll in EHS courses when they traditionally seek general education core courses (e.g., English, math, science)
  • Identifying sufficient resources and creating faculty incentives for developing online courses offered to high school students through dual enrollment or PSEO
  • Working within the parameters of new state legislation and the funding model for PSEO which is perceived by some school districts as a fiscal disadvantage
  • Ensuring students recruited for Bridges and Teacher Academy receive favorable consideration in the Miami admissions process.

Objective 2: Increase life-long learning opportunities, engagement, and giving from alumni, parents, and friends.

Metric 26: Miami will provide educational opportunities and career support to at least 10% of our alumni and other external stakeholders, e.g., through programs similar to Winter College, Alumni Weekend activities, and webinars.

Strategies:

  • In addition to all of our standard graduate degrees and licensure programs that regularly attract and serve our alumni, task the new marketing director in EHS to advertise online courses at the graduate level, including the master’s level licensure program (Special Education) and many graduate certificate programs which are available fully online. 
  • Explore the possibility of developing and implementing an outside speaker program, primarily consisting of EHS alumni and community partners.
  • Continue to sponsor and enhance the marketing of the many EHS-sponsored events
  • Explore the possibility of offering continuing education units in addition to, or in place of, course credit.
  • Through consideration of exemplary models such as those developed in the SAHE program, better leverage social media sites (e.g., Facebook, LinkedIn) to engage alumni from all departments in EHS.
  • Identify courses that can be converted to an online format that would attract and be helpful to our alumni.
  • Offer courses and other professional development (e.g., Dublin Education Leadership Program; Winton Woods Reading Endorsement Program; Mercer County Leadership program) at various sites in the local community (e.g., Voice of America Learning Center, schools, community buildings) and closer to target populations.
  • Consider the possibility of developing study abroad courses that would attract and be helpful to our alumni and of partnering with alumni abroad to facilitate study abroad experiences.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Hiring a coordinator of marketing and global initiatives who can develop and implement a plan to assess alumni needs and facilitate connections between alumni and the college
  • Securing faculty commitment to alumni engagement in the context of many competing faculty priorities.

Metric 27: Increase the total dollar amount raised annually from alumni, parents, and friends by 10% per year.

Strategies:

  • Develop social media sites or sub sites based on specific topics that can be used to encourage faculty and/or students to engage with alumni.
  • Develop and implement plan for identifying and recognizing alumni accomplishments within each department or program.
  • Work closely with the development office to target and cultivate major donors.
  • Ask the new coordinator of marketing and global initiatives to forge relationships with alumni, helping them to match their interests with EHS needs and priorities.
  • Develop college and departmental fundraising plans with clear priorities and strategies to target key programs, such as:
    • Urban Teaching Cohort;
    • SLAM;
    • Nutrition.
  • Involve EHS Advisory Council in targeting funding for specific programs.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Providing incentives for faculty and finding the time to engage with alumni and donors amidst competing priorities for faculty time
  • Selecting appropriately trained faculty for fundraising and alumni outreach efforts.

Objective 3: Grow Miami's sponsored research, grants, intellectual property, internships, and co-curricular learning opportunities by helping corporate, governmental, and non-profit entities thrive through solutions-oriented partnerships.

Metric 28: Increase the total dollars of external funding (contracts and grants) to $30 million.

Strategies:

  • Identify funding capacity in specific disciplinary and interdisciplinary fields, and provide support and incentives for faculty to conduct research in identified areas.
  • Develop and enforce workload norms and policies, and offer additional support for research-active faculty (e.g., grant writing support, start-up packages or seed funds, pre-proposal reviews, research leaves and release time, summer support, equipment).
  • Develop and market services that can be provided to external audiences for a fee (e.g., evaluation services, PD training for CEUS, specific trainings for organizations such as healthy diets, mental health first aid).
  • Continue to leverage EHS faculty and administrators to serve as internal grant and research consultants, and encourage faculty to receive training in research and external grant development.
  • Continue to sponsor training in external grant development (e.g., writing boot campus, workshops on grant-writing, statistical modeling and data analysis software).
  • Continue to provide internal seed and mentoring grants to jump-start and support external grants and faculty research and foster productive relationships with senior faculty or professionals in their field of study.
  • Continue to provide pre-tenure faculty the opportunity to compete for a one-time research leave of six credit hours.
  • Support and sustain the three EHS research centers (e.g.,Doris Bergen Center for Human Development, Learning and Technology (CHDLT); the Evaluation and Assessment Center (E & A); and the Discovery Center) which assist faculty seeking external funding through professional development, mentoring programs, consultation, grant application and budget development, and seed grants. 

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Advancing this metric during a period of shrinking internal and  external funding sources and decreasing numbers of tenure-track faculty positions
  • Balancing and complementing investments in research and teaching for faculty.

Metric 29: Increase by 25% the number of mutually beneficial educational, governmental, and corporate partnerships.

Because EHS currently partners with over 150 schools, agencies, companies or community organizations, EHS will not be focusing on the goal of increasing the number of partners as part of our contributions to Foundation Goal 3.  Instead, we will focus efforts on increasing the quality of our partnerships, including the cultivation of deeper multidimensional and mutually beneficial partnerships.

Our current success in partnership activity is due in large part to the Miami Partnership Office which is housed in EHS and led by an EHS associate dean.  This office helps provide leadership in external partnership activities across campus and throughout the community (e.g., The Talawanda-Miami Partnership, The Knolls of Oxford etc., Family Resource Center, Oxford Seniors, Butler County Safe Communities, and Strong Families Initiative).

Strategies:

  • Increase the quality and depth of the EHS partnerships through assigning a faculty liaison to each partnering school who visits the school regularly and supervises Miami students who are pursuing field placement experiences and student teaching assignments.
  • In collaboration with the Academic Partnerships Committee, develop and implement a partnership tracking system to ensure that consistent, accurate and useful data are obtained and to facilitate effective communication and relationships with partners.
  • Create a plan for assisting and coordinating discipline-specific internships across the college and for enabling strategic partnerships to be shared and cultivated across the division.
  • Continue to monitor and develop shared divisional and departmental goals for partnerships.
  • Leverage alumni contacts and internships to create deeper partnerships and other opportunities for partners to purchase services from EHS and Miami.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Recruiting and rewarding appropriate faculty for the time-consuming responsibility of partnership development and maintenance
  • Finding ways to incent faculty involvement most of EHS faculty easily meet their service requirement without the need to add additional work through partnerships
  • Being conscious not to focus solely on the number of partnerships without careful attention to the quality of the partnership.

Objective 4: Advance Ohio's economic development and prosperity by providing talent and expertise that help shape policy and improves quality of life.

Metric 30: By 2020, 65% of the Miami University community will be engaged in providing expertise and advancing the success of public and private entities.

A majority of EHS faculty are engaged in providing expertise and advancing the success of public and private entities through such activities as consulting; editors and peers reviewers for professional journals, publications, foundations and government funding sources; and service to professional organizations, community organizations and professional public and private entities.

Strategies:

  • Leverage communication outlets to spotlight faculty expertise and accomplishments.
  • Encourage faculty to engage in external service activities related to providing expertise and advancing the success of public and private entities (e.g., serving on boards; editing professional journals; participating on review or policy panels; and working with local, state, and national governments).

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Balancing time commitment for tenured faculty among their various responsibilities in teaching, scholarship, and service – with community service being the lowest priority for most Oxford faculty
  • Cultivating external interests in faculty expertise in the face of Miami’s emphasis on and reputation for undergraduate teaching.