Roudebush Hall
Roudebush Hall, home of Miami's administrative offices

College of Education, Health and Society

Unifying Goal: Promote a vibrant learning and discovery environment that produces extraordinary student and scholarly outcomes.

Objective 1: Prepare students for success at Miami and beyond through a liberal and applied education emphasizing inquiry-based experiential learning that integrates many disciplines.

Metric 1: Miami will achieve a six-year graduation rate of 85% and a four-year graduation rate of 75%.

EHS recognizes that this metric is one that needs our attention. The departments in EHS vary widely in their current retention rates, and a one-size-fits-all approach is not feasible. However, we have begun several initiatives to address our retention rates.

Strategies:

  • Pilot the First-Year Experience course that is team-taught with student affairs staff, with the goal of expanding offerings in future years to accommodate all incoming EHS undergraduate students.
  • Identify and promote the many students and professional organizations at Miami that benefit our EHS majors.
  • Form an EHS Ad Hoc Retention and Enrollment Committee with a faculty representative from each department to review enrollment data, discuss ways to increase retention, and report on committee work to their respective departments.
  • Collaborate with the Student Financial Assistance Office to establish a grant to which EHS students can apply for additional aid that draws from carry-forward funds and enables student participation in  specific programs and opportunities (e.g., study abroad, conference presentations).
  • Design and offer an additional recruitment/yield/retention initiative, such as the Dean’s Admit Program which offers select students additional benefits (e.g., direct admit to programs and majors, early advising).

 Additional departmental plans include:

  • Working with Career Services to revise and improve EDL 100, so that it better informs and prepares students for career pathways earlier in their Miami careers. (EDL)
  • Create more touch-points during the first year for EDT majors (e.g., incorporating greater engagement in  EDT 190, holding at least one event for pre-majors each semester, putting pre-majors in contact with their advisors during the first year). (EDT)
  • Create more programming with Career Services for our students who wish to work for non-profits, to pursue careers that are related to teaching but not in schools, or to complete the degree without student teaching. (EDT)
  • Provide advisor training to enhance faculty advisor skills and thus effectiveness with retention. (EDP)
  • Embed career identity experiences in EDP 220 to enhance professional connection to special education major. (EDP)
  • Require all KNH students to engage in a research, service, independent study, internship, or practicum experience. (KNH)
  • Explore ways of using electronic advising to stay connected with students. (FSW)

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Helping faculty to recognize the important roles they can play in the recruitment and retention of all students (from first-year to graduate students)
  • Tracking student success and identifying key points when students may struggle or experience difficulties.

Metric 2: Within one year after graduation, 90% of graduates (excluding those enrolled in graduate or professional school) will be employed.

We currently do not have division-wide data to report our current numbers on this metric, but a recent survey of teacher-prep alumni, performed by Eduventures, reports that 91% of Miami’s teacher-prep alumni from the previous five years are currently employed (compared to a national benchmark of 85%).

Strategies:

  • In collaboration with Career Services, identify ways to enhance our students’ potential for employment. Career Services has already helped us develop some new programs and some plans for additional services.
  • Develop a better system for tracking recent graduates and alumni, building on the established relationships between faculty and students.
  • With Career Services, create more touch-points throughout the undergraduate experience to highlight career development.

 Additional departmental plans include:

  • Connect faculty more purposefully with school districts to nurture relationships. (EDP)
  • Develop programming for students on the career paths beyond K-12 teaching, and assist students in seeking and securing non-teaching positions. (EDT)
  • Enhance partnerships with Career Services and major employers, including sharing an office within Phillips Hall for an assistant director for career services to use in direct collaboration with KNH students to engage them in career decisions, resume building, and job search strategies. (KNH)
  • Strengthen our targeted relationship with Talbert House as a possible place for internships and the employment of FSW students after graduation. (FSW)

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Obtaining reliable data in an area which has not previously been tracked.

Metric 3: Upon graduation, 80% of students who apply to graduate or professional school will receive at least one offer of admission.

Current EHS data for this metric are not available. All departments report that they are increasing efforts to maintain connections to their graduates which will help the reporting of these data.

It is also important to note that EHS comprises departments that yield graduates with professional degrees, so many of our students do not apply to graduate or professional school immediately after graduation.

In particular, the number of EHS graduates who apply to graduate school reflects the fact that teachers in Ohio are no longer required to complete a master’s degree. For those teachers who do eventually opt for a master’s degree, they are encouraged to enter the job market first, gain experience in the field, and then pursue a master’s degree after they have been teaching for several years (since it is more expensive for a school district to hire a master’s level teacher).

Strategies:

  • Expand our 3+2 and 4+1 opportunities to assist undergraduates in transitioning to graduate degrees where appropriate.

 Departmental plans include:

  • Encourage appropriate students to pursue 4+1 programs in EDP and FSW. (EDP)
  • Recruit the most capable students from our departmental BSW program into our MSW program. (FSW)
  • Encourage high quality students in our undergraduate family studies and social work student organization to enroll in introductory graduate courses. (FSW)
  • Encourage quality undergraduates to enroll in introductory graduate courses. (KNH)

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying students who have immediate interests in graduate school and advertising possible 3+2 and 4+1 to our undergraduates and prospective students.

Objective 2: Immerse faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students in research and creative scholarship that forms a vital part of the learning experience.

Metric 4: Continue to increase the quality and impact of scholarship or creative performance.

Strategies:

  • Continue fair enforcement of workload policy.
  • Improve probationary faculty research by limiting the number of new courses taught prior to tenure.
  • Effectively connect teaching assignments with research interests.
  • Encourage faculty to make use of the recently added research infrastructure in EHS, such as assistance with statistical analyses and programs.
  • Support and provide writing assistance and encouragement (e.g., writing boot camps, workshops, lunches, senior faculty mentoring).
  • Encourage use of EHS mentoring grants to help faculty identify and achieve their scholarship goals.
  • Re-institute the summer research stipends for pre-tenure faculty.
  • Consider wider use of graduate assistantships for research assistance for faculty.
  • Systematically conduct peer reviews of potential scholarly submissions.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Achieving this metric with the reduction of funding from the Provost’s Office for research assistance and the declining amount of available external funding
  • Diversifying our faculty with visiting assistant professors, lecturers and clinical faculty will enable tenure-track faculty to focus more on research.

Metric 5: Upon graduation, all Miami students will have participated in a research (40%) or a similar experiential learning activity (100%), e.g., fieldwork, field or clinical placement, service-learning, public or private sector engagement, performances, and other applied learning activities.

Strategies:

  • Coordinate additional assistance for EHS faculty and students who are interested in applying for the Undergraduate Summer Scholars program.
  • Assist faculty in incorporating research projects in their undergraduate courses.
  • Continue to encourage and promote cutting-edge research tools that are being used in undergraduate courses (e.g., the Anatomage table, TeachLivE).
  • Continue to facilitate additional research opportunities for faculty through their active participation in community engagement.
  • Require undergraduate students to engage in some type of experiential learning activity, including research projects, practica, internships, student teaching, and other service-based experiences.
  • Identify new and different clinical experience models (e.g., Miami Connections) that would enable more students to experience field work in earlier and more varied settings.

Departmental plans include:

  • Encourage faculty to involve students in presenting at the undergraduate research forum. (EDT)
  • Provide some modest monetary support for undergraduates to attend and present at national research conferences. (EDT)
  • Integrate more undergraduate research projects into EDL 204 and 318. (EDL)
  • Emphasize the availability of local and regional conferences in which graduate students can share their work, including our own biennial EDL Graduate Student Conference, the biennial Race, Class, Gender, Sexuality Symposium, as well as Graduate School Conference at Miami. (EDL)
  • Scaffold research papers for conferences more seamlessly into graduate coursework. (EDL)
  • Incorporate cutting edge technology into undergraduate classes (e.g. Undergraduates enrolled in KNH 244 L Functional Anatomy Laboratory will use a virtual cadaver regularly; a Patient Simulator used in 200,300, and 400 level classes in Athletic Training and Kinesiology). (KNH)
  • Encourage quality undergraduates to enroll in introductory graduate courses (KNH)
  • Increase student involvement in presenting their research at regional, state, and national conferences, and provide support with transportation and housing when possible. (KNH)
  • Plan and build an outdoor classroom adjacent to Phillips Hall to facilitate different learning environments (e.g., PALS classes). (KNH)
  • Increase opportunities in FSW courses for student involvement in service learning. (FSW)
  • Continue to involve 100% of EDT students in 2-4 semesters of field experiences. (EDT)

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Finding additional resources to purchase and maintain expensive equipment used in some of the research
  • Continuing our involvement with community and school partners (and the development of new partnerships) to continue providing our students with experiential learning opportunities.

Objective 3: Engage students with substantive co-curricular and internship opportunities that augment their learning and establish a strong foundation for lifelong success, growth, and adaptability.

Metric 6: 75% of Miami students will complete an internship before they graduate.

Our division’s definition of “internship” is broader than the one used by the university and includes the student teaching experience.

Strategies:

  • Identify models that are already working well at our institution and at aspirational institutions to expand our co-curricular and internship offerings.

Departmental plans include:

  • Develop a field project model in the community-based leadership minor so that students can work on flexible-credit projects in regional community agencies or organizations that fit models of leadership taught in our courses. (EDL)
  • Maintain records of internships that master’s students have completed and communicate this information to current students. (EDL, SAHE)
  • Partner with departments across university that would benefit from SAHE student internships. (EDL, SAHE)
  • Network with key employers in a variety of fields to provide internships and real life experiences for students. (KNH)
  • Provide clear information to students about available internships through a KNH student Niihka site, emails, social media and Phillips Hall lobby monitor. (KNH)
  • Develop internships for students who do not wish to teach in K-12 (i.e., help place education students in non-profit and corporate work). (EDT)
  • Increase our networking with agencies that can provide internship/field placement sites and possible employment for FSW students. (FSW)
  • Engage in formal partnership arrangements with agencies that can serve as potential sites for internships/field placements. (FSW)

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Helping departments and divisions across the university understand that student teaching is a type of internship
  • Troubleshooting the difficulties arising as a result of the overlapping timing of the winter term and the start of spring student teaching.

Metric 7: 95% of Miami students will have two or more co-curricular experiences before they graduate.

The EHS departments offer a wide array of co-curricular experiences, including:

  • Social Work Honors Society, Family Studies and Social Work Undergraduate Student Organization, Master of Arts in Social Work Graduate Student Organization. (FSW)
  • Miami University Student Affairs Graduate Association, Graduate Student Council. (EDL, SAHE)
  • Phi Epsilon Kappa (a national professional fraternity for persons engaged in or pursuing careers in physical education, health, and recreation), Pre-Physical and Occupational Therapy Club, Student Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Student Sport Leadership and Management Organization, PEER Health educators, Student Athletic Training Organization. (KNH)
  • Adopt a School (a partnership with the Office of Community Engagement and Service), CEC (Council for Exceptional Children), Best Buddies (a community-based partnership in which EDP students are paired with local children who have a disability), Miami Connections (program where EDP students serve as mentors for high school students who are at risk for school failure or under-achieving), Student Chapter of the National Association for School Psychologist (NASP). (EDP)
  • Miami University Foreign Language Association (MUFLA), French Conversation Group, Miami Reads, MU National Science Teachers Association, Kappa Delta Pi, MU Ambassadors for Children, NCTE-SAM, Digital Expo, Miami Council for the Social Studies, MU Student Education Association & Intergenerational Mentoring. (EDT)

Strategies:

  • Provide divisional-related student organizations with leadership-development opportunities, and better highlight the work and accomplishments of these organizations.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Locating available data so that students’ involvement in co-curricular activities can be tracked and improvements are made based upon the data

Objective 4: Offer flexible pathways to and through the University, including interdisciplinary, e-learning, and multiple degree options, to help students achieve timely and cost-effective completion.

Metric 8: 20% of our students will graduate with multiple degrees, majors, or co-majors, and 5% will graduate with a combination bachelor and master's degree.

Strategies:

  • Advise appropriate students early in their undergraduate experience on how to complete dual majors, degrees and co-majors in a timely manner.

Departmental plans include:

  • Continue to promote double majors in content areas and AYA (e.g., AYA Social Studies and Political Science, AYA English/Language Arts and English). (EDT)
  • Promote the value of the TELLs certificate, the add-on endorsements to expand the grade level licensures in Early Childhood and Middle Childhood Education, and courses to certify teachers under the Ohio Third Grade Reading Guarantee. (EDT)
  • Include course electives from departments outside of our department and division in the community-based leadership minor and the cultural studies and public life thematic sequence to enable interdisciplinary learning as well as greater flexibility in completing the degree program or requirement. (EDL)
  • Phase the new Advanced Standing Program into the MASW program to provide a major avenue for students to proceed from the BSW program to the MASW program. (FSW)
  • Explore the possibility of engaging in a partnership with the Scripps Gerontology Center and gerontology program to provide educational opportunities for students. (FSW)
  • Invite graduate school programs to the graduate fair or to be speakers in departmental clubs. (KNH)
  • Explore the possibility of combining degree programs, such as combining the undergraduate programs in special education or teacher education with a graduate degree in the other department; pairing family studies or social work graduate program with an educational psychology graduate program; or combining instructional technology with a teacher education degree. (EDP)
  • Develop the following degree programs:
    • BS-MS in Kinesiology-Exercise and Health Science (KNH)
    • BS-MS in Sport Leadership and Management-Sport Leadership (KNH)
    • BS-MS in Health Promotion (KNH)
    • BS-MS in Nutrition (KNH)
    • B.Ed/M.Ed. General Education/Special Education (EDT)
    • B.A./M.A.T. HST or POL/AYA Social Studies (EDT)
    • B.A./M.A.T. Science (CHM or ZOO)/AYA Science (EDT)

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Advising students about ways to pursue multiple majors and the benefits of co-majors.
  • Coordinating the demands of a professional degree with a liberal arts degree.

Metric 9: 60% of degree programs can be completed in three years or less through curriculum revision and by using different pedagogical approaches and modes of delivery.

Plans have already been developed for the following EHS undergraduate degree programs:

  • Family Studies (FSW)
  • Nutrition (KNH)
  • Sport Leadership and Management (SLAM) (KNH)
  • Health Promotion (KNH)
  • Kinesiology (KNH).

We have carefully reviewed all of the other EHS programs to investigate whether they could be added to this list. However, due to accreditation and licensure standards, which greatly dictate the curriculum, no additional degree programs can be reasonably completed in three years.

As a result, this metric has been met as much as possible.

Metric 10: Increase the online and hybrid credit hours to 10% of the total credit hours.

Strategies:

  • Continue to recognize the need and importance of providing online or hybrid courses where appropriate.
  • Leverage the talents of the designated faculty member who is responsible for working with faculty to integrate online learning into more courses.
  • Offer faculty development opportunities, such as faculty learning communities, to support the design of online courses.
  • Create the following online undergraduate courses:
    • KNH 102, 177, 184, 188, 209, 244, 244L, 381,381L, 382, 685
    • EDP 201, EDP 279
    • 2 additional undergraduate courses (EDP)
    • EDT 362, 202, 246M, 246E, 246A, 190
    • FSW 281, 381, 261, 481, 466, 201, 295, 206
    • EDL 204, 315, 333
  • Develop the following online graduate courses and curricula:
    • The entire curriculum of SEOH (30 credits about 10 graduate courses) (EDP)
    • The entire graduate IDT program (EDP)
    • Two graduate certificates (mental health and assessment) that will leverage online modes of delivery. (EDP)
    • Teaching English Language Learners (TELLs) graduate certificate (EDT)
    • EDT/EDL 648
    • FSW 494
    • EDL 647, 614, the re-opened Ed. D. program
    • EDT 603, 604, 643, 636, 646
    • Concentration for the M.Ed. in Transformative Education.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Balancing the increasing student interest in online classes with the faculty desire to maintain a teacher, not a managerial, role in the courses. 
  • Maintaining course enrollments in online classes to optimize learning (e.g., ideally less than 30 students). (KNH)
  • Designing online tests and assignments to facilitate academic honesty. (KNH)
  • Ensuring high quality courses through Quality Matters review or similar measures. (KNH)
  • Recognizing the challenge of adapting  field placement courses (i.e., social work courses) to online delivery. (FSW & EDT)
  • Exploring the possibility of offering a hybrid research foundations course that would allow more flexibility for students completing their research sequence as well as the development of a hybrid PhD Research Practicum course that enables on-line faculty/peer feedback. (EDL, SAHE)