Roudebush Hall
Roudebush Hall, home of Miami's administrative offices

Graduate School and Research Office

(Includes Scripps Gerontology Center and the Myaamia Center)

Foundational Goal 2: Promote a diverse culture of inclusion, integrity, and collaboration that deepens understanding and embraces intercultural and global experiences.

Objective 1: Attract and retain a diverse community of students, faculty, staff, and administrators.

Metric 18: Grow the diversity of our students, faculty, and staff.

Strategies:

  • Use due diligence in our staff hiring process to ensure that we reach diverse people.
  • Implement new diversity enhancement efforts in the Graduate School, including:
    • Advertising and implementing the Diversity Enhancement Pathway (matching funds for diverse students);
    • Advertising and implementing the Miami McNair Graduate Fellows (matching funds and a research assistantship for McNair alums);
    • Targeting international grants-in-aid to World Bank, low income and other target countries to increase diversity of international graduate students.
  • Increase the number of connections and agreements with HBCU's and universities that have McNair Scholars programs for graduate student recruiting.
  • Increase number of recruiting visits to four year institutions that have high numbers of diverse or international undergraduate students.
  • Encourage submission of grants to support research opportunities for diverse students (e.g., National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates program)
  • Increase retention of diverse graduate students
    • Develop student-to-student mentoring system for diverse graduate students through the GSCA.
    • Encourage and facilitate opportunities for diverse graduate students to interact with other diverse students, including international students.
  • Encourage and support student and faculty involvement in the Graduate Students of Color Association (GSCA).
  • Provide administrative support from Scripps Gerontology Center for the Master of Population Science and Gerontology program, which is dually located between Miami University and Mahidol University (in Thailand).
  • Administer graduate programs that intentionally recruit a diverse student body (including national and international students).
  • Dedicate resources for recruitment (such as videos and social media) that attract a diverse audience of graduate students.
  • Continue to seek qualified Miami Tribe students to attend Miami University.
  • Expand the Myaamia Center's staff and offerings in the area of Indigenous Education with focus on language and cultural education.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Managing programs with limited staff time
  • Re-budgeting grants-in-aid and McNair funds to match program needs as opposed to historic uses.
  • Encouraging students who experience difficulties to seek support early and more often will increase retention and a sense of inclusion.
  • Having a diverse student population has been a benefit for all graduate students.
  • Identifying and recruiting qualified staff for Scripps Gerontology Center research positions has been an ongoing challenge.
  • Using new recruitment strategies (such as videos and social media) requires specialized staffing and a method to track the effectiveness of new recruitment strategies.
  • Using tribal news media to inform the tribal community about opportunities at Miami University.
  • Utilizing public social media to communicate the work of the Myaamia Center and Scripps Gerontology Center to the world and attract interested individuals and organizations to support and/or collaborate.

Objective 2: Create an environment where our people live, learn, and work cooperatively with those of widely varied backgrounds, beliefs, abilities, and lifestyles, moving beyond boundaries to welcome, seek, and understand diverse peoples and perspectives.

Metric 19: 75% of Miami students will report that they feel welcome and have had significant and meaningful interactions with diverse groups.

Strategies:

  • Provide support for multicultural training opportunities for staff and interested faculty.
  • Encourage and support student and faculty involvement in Graduate Students of Color Association (GSCA).
  • Collaborate with Global Initiatives to develop support systems (e.g., transportation, housing for families, cultural events, cultural support) for international graduate students.
  • Promote and support a culturally diverse work environment in each unit that includes the use of languages including Farsi, Arabic, Japanese, German, Spanish, and Myaamia among staff and students who are comfortable using these languages.
  • Develop parallel graduate school websites in Mandarin, Spanish, and Arabic to enhance comfort and ability of non-English speaking students to navigate the application and admissions process.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying funds to support international, tribal and diverse student needs.
  • Identifying multicultural training opportunities on campus.
  • Utilizing the nature of our work as a resource for expressing culture in both an educational and work environment.

Objective 3: Achieve cultural competency among members of the Miami community by immersing them in domestically and globally relevant learning experiences.

Metric 20: By the time of graduation, 60% of Miami students will have studied abroad or studied away.

Strategies:

  • Provide Scripps Gerontology Center administrative support for the Master of Population Science and Gerontology program, which is dually located between Miami University and Mahidol University (in Thailand), such that students have one year of study at Miami and one year at Mahidol.
  • Provide opportunities for students to study or do research in Oklahoma with the Miami Tribe.
  • Expose staff, faculty, and students to an indigenous self-governing domestic community (i.e., the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma) where they experience a wide range of unique political, economic, social and cultural experiences.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Providing additional study abroad or study away opportunities is more appropriate to academic departments than to Scripps Gerontology Center since they are not a degree program.
  • Continuing engagement with the Miami Tribe on different levels to achieve diverse and rich opportunities for collaboration and sharing.

Metric 21: All Miami students will have a curricular or co-curricular cultural learning experience, (e.g., intensive community engagement, service learning experience, intercultural or global learning requirement) by the time they graduate.

Strategies:

  • Offer opportunities for co-curricular cultural learning through Scripps Gerontology Center OMA, where over 200 students participated in 2013.
  • Administer the Master of Population Science and Gerontology program, which is dually located between Miami University and Mahidol University (in Thailand), such that students have one year of study at Miami and one year at Mahidol.
  • Support from the Myaamia Center for EDL 259 Introduction to the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma, which is a new undergraduate course. 
  • Regular visits from Myaamia Center to classes across disciplines to share cultural perspectives.
  • Organize and teach via Myaamia Center one-credit courses each semester required to be taken by Heritage Award recipients.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying new and expanding financial resources to support Scripps Gerontology Center OMA programming.
  • Maintaining regular undergraduate classroom interaction through courses taught and visited by Myaamia Center.

Objective 4: Expand, virtually and physically, Miami's global involvement.

Metric 22: All faculty and staff will engage in meaningful, globally diverse cultural activities (e.g., volunteer or community engagement, course or workshops on global and intercultural topics, professional training on diversity issues, regular interaction with diverse groups, participation in cultural events) within the past 24 months.

Strategies:

  • Encourage and provide support for staff to be involved in globally diverse cultural activities.
  • Mentor international students in assistantships, critical inquiries, and dissertations.
  • Support Scripps Gerontology Center Fellows and graduate students to attend conferences and present on global aging.
  • Collaborate with Global Initiatives to offer workshops or training to international students for US cultural competency.
  • Collaborate with Global Initiatives to offer workshops or training to faculty and staff who teach or work with international or diverse students on global, intercultural, and diversity issues.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying funds for activities, workshops, and training opportunities.
  • Finding time within an already full workload to propose and implement new initiatives.
  • Providing incentives for faculty and students to participate in these activities.
  • Prioritizing resources for workshops and events to ensure the largest impact and attendance.

Metric 23: Miami will expand, virtually and physically, by 50%, its international partnerships to increase its impact on the global stage.

Strategies:

  • Develop relationships with alumni and colleagues at international corporations or universities who are interested in developing partnerships.
  • Increase the number of educational exchange and matriculation agreements with international universities.
  • Encourage and support workshops and events with international collaborators to engage more faculty, staff, and students in international and intercultural aging issues.
  • Encourage and support presentations at national and international conferences with global emphasis.
  • Discuss opportunities for Scripps Gerontology Center research collaborations with partners at Mahidol University (Thailand) and Tsukuba University (Japan).
  • Provide opportunities to engage with indigenous communities and researchers nationally and internationally.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying and connecting with alumni at international corporations.
  • Enticing faculty to develop meaningful relationships with international university partners.
  • Enticing faculty to submit grant proposals to agencies that fund work outside of the USA.
  • Prioritizing resources for workshops and events to ensure the largest impact and attendance.
  • Providing resources for international scholar exchanges.
  • Providing conference travel support.
  • Seeking opportunities that allow the Myaamia Center and its staff to participate on both the national and international level in the field of Indigenous language and cultural education.