Roudebush Hall
Roudebush Hall, home of Miami's administrative offices

Graduate School and Research Office

(Includes Scripps Gerontology Center and the Myaamia Center)

Unifying Goal: Promote a vibrant learning and discovery environment that produces extraordinary student and scholarly outcomes.

Objective 1: Prepare students for success at Miami and beyond through a liberal and applied education emphasizing inquiry-based experiential learning that integrates many disciplines.

Metric 1: Miami will achieve a six-year graduation rate of 85% and a four-year graduation rate of 75%.

Strategies:

  • Offer supplemental support through the Myaamia Center to all Miami Tribe students on campus to achieve highest possible graduation rate (currently 77%).

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying language and cultural support needs of tribal students.
  • Offering non-academic opportunities to bond with tribal peers.
  • Conducting appropriate research to identify future needs.

Metric 2: Within one year after graduation, 90% of graduates (excluding those enrolled in graduate or professional school) will be employed.

Strategies:

  • Make position openings available with the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma open and attractive to graduating seniors.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying students who are best trained for such positions.
  • Providing more opportunities for students to experience summer employment with Miami Tribe prior to graduation.

Metric 3: Upon graduation, 80% of students who apply to graduate or professional school will receive at least one offer of admission.

Strategies:

  • Assist students in the Myaamia Center to identify programs that support their individual educational goals.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Advising students and writing letters of support for students seeking advanced degrees is time consuming.

Objective 2: Immerse faculty, undergraduate, and graduate students in research and creative scholarship that forms a vital part of the learning experience.

Metric 4: Continue to increase the quality and impact of scholarship or creative performance.

Strategies:

  • Provide resources and support for research and scholarship at all levels by:
    • Facilitating and supporting the functions of the faculty research and undergraduate research committees;
    • Providing funds for the PREP program through indirect cost recovery;
    • Administering endowments and accounts for faculty and student research and scholarship (e.g., Undergraduate Summer Scholars (USS), Undergraduate Research Committee Grants (UGR), Faculty Research Committee Grants (CFR), Doctoral/Undergraduate Opportunity for Scholarship (DUOS)), travel awards, Graduate Student Association (GSA), and Graduate Students of Color Association (GSCA) activities;
    • Offering incentives for faculty and student participation in research and in proposal development and submission (e.g., External Proposal Submission Incentive (EPSI), research round tables, workshops)
  • Create and staff the Office of Research for Undergraduates by:
    • Establishing a full-time staff person as coordinator of undergraduate research;
    • Establishing 0.5 FTE faculty director of undergraduate research;
    • Renovating a portion of King Library for the physical ORU location.
    • Developing a marketing and communications plan to enhance visibility and accessibility of research, scholarly, and creative opportunities for undergraduate students.
    • Providing a central location (physical and virtual) for advising undergraduate students on, and to access information for, research opportunities.
    • Writing grants to support program-wide activities such as summer research experiences and experiential learning curriculum development.
  • Maintain and expand the First Year Research Experience (FYRE) program with the goal of involving 10% of all first year students (~360 per year) in the program.
  • Offer opportunities through the Myaamia Center for undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, and staff to participate in ongoing language and cultural research and educational material development.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying resources needed to fund all activities with limited access to E&G funds
  • Working with University Advancement to identify donors for these activities
  • Recruiting faculty to participate in research-oriented programs.
  • Continuing to seek financial support for students, staff and faculty.
  • Inviting students, staff and faculty when research opportunities are created.
  • Allowing opportunities for students, staff and faculty to approach the Myaamia Center with research interests and opportunities.

Metric 5: Upon graduation, all Miami students will have participated in a research (40%) or a similar experiential learning activity (100%), e.g., fieldwork, field or clinical placement, service-learning, public or private sector engagement, performances, and other applied learning activities.

Strategies:

  • Maintain and expand the FYRE program with the goal of involving 10% of all first year students (~360 per year) in the program.
  • Extend the FYRE program into the students’ second year.
  • Coordinate and advertise university-wide research offerings through the Office of Research for Undergraduates.
  • In collaboration with Miami Government Relations Network, create alternative spring break opportunities for student researchers to communicate with policy makers in Columbus and Washington, DC (i.e., posters on the hill).
  • Enhance the undergraduate research committee opportunities (e.g., UGR, DUOS, USS).
  • Provide continued opportunities for any student to engage with the Miami Tribe through service learning, summer employment, and other hands-one experiences.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying funds to expand research programs such as FYRE, UGR, DUOS, USS
  • Writing grants to support expanded offerings (particularly by the undergraduate research office)
  • Recruiting faculty needed to support expanded opportunities.
  • Designing research programs that are scalable to large numbers of undergraduate students.

Objective 3: Engage students with substantive co-curricular and internship opportunities that augment their learning and establish a strong foundation for lifelong success, growth, and adaptability.

Metric 6: 75% of Miami students will complete an internship before they graduate.

Strategies:

  • Provide assistance in developing internships with current partners in Scripps Gerontology Center.
  • Assist in developing new partnerships for Scripps Gerontology Center internship sites.
  • Awarding scholarships (from donor gifts) that are earmarked for Scripps Gerontology Center internship or practicum experiences.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying and/or developing internships for students is typically the responsibility of academic departments and Scripps Gerontology Center is not an academic department.
  • Developing and maintaining donors, soliciting student applications, and awarding scholarships based on specific criteria (such as predicted impact of internship projects) requires a large amount of staff time.

Metric 7: 95% of Miami students will have two or more co-curricular experiences before they graduate.

Strategies:

  • In collaboration with Miami Government Relations Network, create alternative spring break opportunities for student researchers to communicate with policy makers in Columbus and Washington, DC (e.g., posters on the hill).
  • Collaborate with Myaamia Center to develop service learning or cultural experiences with the Miami Tribe.
  • Offer co-curricular opportunities through the Scripps Gerontology Center Opening Minds through Art (OMA) program, OMA club, and OMA leaders.
  • Provide Scripps Gerontology Center-sponsored events such as public lectures and brown bag presentations.
  • Provide leadership development opportunities through the Scripps Gerontology Center Cottrell Leadership Development fund.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Identifying funds to support programs.
  • Identifying increasing resources to support Scripps Gerontology Center OMA programming.
  • Utilizing WebEx and Skype to facilitate more co-curricular distance-learning experiences.
  • Developing Scripps Gerontology Center Cottrell Leadership Development programming to serve the needs of gerontology graduate students.

Objective 4: Offer flexible pathways to and through the University, including interdisciplinary, e-learning, and multiple degree options, to help students achieve timely and cost-effective completion.

Metric 8: 20% of our students will graduate with multiple degrees, majors, or co-majors, and 5% will graduate with a combination bachelor and master's degree.

Strategies:

  • Encourage and support an increased number of combined bachelor’s—master’s degree programs.

Challenges and Opportunities:

  • Providing incentives to departments to offer combined options
  • Managing large numbers of non-thesis masters students.

Metric 9: 60% of degree programs can be completed in three years or less through curriculum revision and by using different pedagogical approaches and modes of delivery.

This metric is not applicable to the Graduate School and Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship.

Metric 10: Increase the online and hybrid credit hours to 10% of the total credit hours.

This metric is not applicable to the Graduate School and Office for the Advancement of Research and Scholarship.