Roman Senate

Miami Plan Courses

CAS-A Requirement:

GRK 101 - Beginning Greek (4)
GRK 102 - Beginning Greek  (4)
GRK 201 - Homer (3)
GRK 202 - Plato (3)

LAT 101 - Beginning Latin (4)
LAT 102 - Beginning Latin (4)
LAT 201 - Representative Latin Authors (3)
LAT 202 - Representative Latin Authors (3)

LAT 121 - Review Latin (4)
LAT 201 - Representative Latin Authors (3)
LAT 202 - Representative Latin Authors (3)

CAS-B Requirement:

CLS 101 - Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
CLS 102 - Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 121 - Introduction to Classical Mythology (3)
CLS 211 - Greek and Roman Epic (3)
CLS 212 - Greek and Roman Tragedy (3)
CLS 213 - Greek and Roman Comedy (3)
CLS 215 - Greek and Roman Historians (3)
CLS 317 - Greek and Roman Philosophical Writers (3)
CLS 331 - From Epic to Romance (3)
GRK 201 - Homer (3)
GRK 202 - Plato (3)
GRK 301 - Advanced Readings in Representative Authors (3)
GRK 302 - Advanced Readings in Representative Authors (3)
GRK 310 - Special Topics in Greek Literature (3; maximum 12)
GRK 410 - Special Topics in Greek Literature (3; maximum 12)
LAT 202 - Representative Latin Authors (3)
LAT 310 - Special Topics in Latin Literature (3; maximum 12)
LAT 404 - Medieval Latin (3)
LAT 410 - Latin Seminar (3; maximum 12)

CAS-E Requirement:

CLS 303-  Introduction to Linguistics (4)

Foundation IIB (Humanities):

CLS 101 - Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
CLS 102 - Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 121 - Introduction to Classical Mythology (3)

Foundation V (Formal Reasoning):

CLS 303 - Introduction to Linguistics (4)

Historical Perspective:

CLS 101 - Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3)
CLS 102 - Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 121 - Introduction to Classical Mythology (3)

Thematic Sequences:

CLS 1 Classical Civilization.
(Not open to majors in the Department of Classics. Majors in the departments of Art and Comparative Religion must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major)

Combines a general introduction to classical civilization and an in-depth encounter with Greco-Roman civilization, focusing on elements that provide opportunities for observing differences between modern and ancient civilization. Uses literature, monuments, legal documents, art, and sculpture to examine key examples of social organization, including the status of women, legal structures, and urban organization.

First Course Options
CLS 101
Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3) (MPF), or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) (MPF), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) (MPF); and

Second Course Options
ART 381
Greek and Roman Architecture (3),or
CLS 210E Eureka: Monumental Discoveries in the Attics of Antiquity (3), or
CLS 210J Art and Archaeology of Egypt (3),or
CLS 210R Race and Ethnicity in Antiquity (3), or
CLS 235 Women in Antiquity (3); and

Third Course Options
ART 382
Greek and Roman Painting (3), or
ART 383 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3), or
CLS 310D Democracy and Identity in Ancient Athens (3), or
CLS 310E Conflict in Greco-Roman Egypt (3), or
CLS 310I Ancient Imperialism (3), or
CLS 310T Arts and Empire in the Classical World and Russia (3), or
CLS 321 Justice and the Law (3), or
CLS 322 Growing Old in Greece and Rome (3), or
REL 334 Women's Religious Experiences in the Ancient Mediterranean World (3)

CLS 2 Classical Literature.
(Not open to majors in the Department of Classics.)

Provides an overview of Greek or Roman literature, then examines in detail the historical evolution of specific genres, such as tragedy, drama, and epic. Attention to historical forces that brought these genres into existence and those forces that affected their growth and development.

First Course Options
CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3) (MPF), or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) (MPF), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) (MPF); and

Second Course Options
CLS 210
/RUS 250 Classical Tradition in Russian Poetry (3), or
CLS 211 Greek and Roman Epic (3), or
CLS 212 Greek Tragedy (3), or
CLS 213 Greek and Roman Comedy (3), or
CLS 215 Roman Historians (3); and

Third Course Options
CLS 218 Greek and Roman Erotic Poetry (3), or
CLS 310P From the Lair of the Cyclops to the Surface of the Moon: Travel and Self-Definition in Antiquity (3), or
CLS 310S Egypt in Greco-Roman History and Fiction (3), or
CLS 310T Arts and Empire in the Classical World and Russia (3), or
CLS 317 Greek and Roman Philosophical Writers (3), or
CLS 331 From Epic to Romance (3)

CLS 3 The Classical World: Words and Images.
(Not open to majors in the Department of Classics. Majors in the Departments of Art and English must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.)

Classical antiquity was uniquely creative in producing literary and visual forms (epic, lyric, tragedy, comedy, history, rhetoric, philosophic dialogue and the philosophic treatise) by which it communicated socially rooted visions and ideals. This sequence fosters students’ grasp of the role form plays in shaping what any culture expresses at the same time it focuses on the historically determined values and visions that were thus expressed. Students will examine ways in which basic forms interact and evolve into new forms (e.g. epic to novel, public speaking in epic and history to full-fledged rhetoric) and the subsequent reception of these forms in other ancient and modern cultures. They will also concentrate on particular conflicts over the ways in which different forms compete for ideological supremacy.

First Course Options
CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3) (MPF), or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) (MPF), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) (MPF); and

Second Course Options
CLS 211 Greek and Roman Epic (3), or
CLS 212 Greek and Roman Tragedy (3), or
CLS 213 Greek and Roman Comedy (3), or
CLS 215 Greek and Roman Historians (3), or
CLS 216 Greek and Roman Erotic Poetry
ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3), or
ART 382 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3), or
ART 383 Greek and Roman Painting (3); and

Third Course Options
CLS 333 The Greeks in the Near East and Central Asia (3), or
CLS 331 From Epic to Romance (3), or
CLS 323 Discoveries of Archaeology (3), or
CLS 334 Egypt in Greco-Roman History and Fiction (3), or
ENG 314 Playwriting (4)

CLS 4 The Classical World: Identity and Experience.
(Not open to majors in the Department of Classics.)

Specific to Classical antiquity was a set of deeply influential institutions, practices, and ideological elaborations that both drew from and interacted with a wide range of other Mediterranean cultures in shaping the day-to-day identities and life experiences of Greeks and Romans as well as the cultures on which they impacted. In this sequence, students explore some of the most basic issues (e.g. gender, religion, public entertainments, race and ethnicity, imperial conquest and domination) associated with these influences and their more specialized consequences in specific geographical, cultural and institutional areas (e.g. Egypt, Jews in Antiquity, The Construction of Age Identities).

First Course Options
CLS 101
Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (3) (MPF), or
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) (MPF), or
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) (MPF); and

Second Course Options
CLS 210R Race& Ethnicity in Antiquity (3), or
CLS 235 Women In Antiquity (3), or
CLS 210U Ancient Sexuality, or
CLS 235 Women in Antiquity (3); and

Third Course Options
CLS 310E Conflict in Greco-Roman Egypt (3),or
CLS 310J Jews Among Greeks & Romans (3), or
CLS 332 Mythology and the Arts (3), or
CLS 333 The Greeks in the Near East and Central Asia (3)