Cynthia Klestinec

Cynthia KlestinecDirector of Graduate Studies
Associate Professor

356 Bachelor Hall
Oxford Campus
(513) 529-1395
klestic@MiamiOH.edu

EDUCATION

Ph.D., Comparative Literature, University of Chicago, 2001

M.A., Comparative Literature, University of Chicago, 1995

B.A., Comparative Literature, University of Georgia, 1994

TEACHING INTERESTS
  • Renaissance Literature
  • Scientific Revolution
  • Medicine and Literature
  • Representations of Health
  • The History of the Book
RESEARCH INTERESTS
  • Renaissance anatomy and dissection
  • The history of medical specialties and medical professions, including surgery
  • The Scientific Revolution
  • Histories of the body (sex and gender)
SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Books:

  • Miracles and Medicine in the Age of Tintoretto (an exhibition in the Scuola grande di San Marco, Venice, opening September 2018), exhibition catalogue, co-curated with Gabriele Matino, in progress 
  • Professors, Physicians and Practices in the History of Medicine: Essays in Honor of Nancy Siraisi, eds. C. Klestinec and G. Manning (New York: Springer, 2017).
  • Theaters of Anatomy: Students, Teachers, and Traditions of Dissection in Renaissance Venice (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2011).

Journals, Special Issue

  • Renaissance Surgery: Between Learning and Craft, eds. C. Klestinec and D. Bertoloni Meli, special issue of the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, vol. 72, no. 1 (2016). 

Articles:

  • “Vesalius among the Surgeons” in the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Culture, special issue, Valeria Finucci, ed., in press
  • “Translating Learned Surgery” in the Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 72, no. 1 (2017): 34-50.
  • “Touch, Trust, and Compliance in Early Modern Medical Practice” in The Edinburgh Companion to the Critical Medical Humanities, Anne Whitehead, Angela Woods, Sarah Atkinson, Jane Macnaughton and Jennifer Richards, eds. (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2016).
  • “Renaissance Surgeons: Anatomy, Manual Skill and the Visual Arts” in Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy, P. Distelzweig, B. Goldberg, and E. Ragland, eds. (New York: Springer, 2016), 43-58.
  • “Sex, Medicine, and Disease: Welcoming Wombs and Vernacular Anatomies” in A Cultural History of Sexuality: the Renaissance, Bette Talvacchia, ed. (Oxford, New York: Berg, 2011), 113-136.
  • “Practical Experience in Anatomy” in The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge: Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science, Ofer Gal, Charles T. Wolfe, eds. (Sydney: Springer, 2010), 33-58. 
  • “Civility, Comportment, and the Anatomy Theater: Girolamo Fabrici and His Medical Students in Renaissance Padua,” Renaissance Quarterly (July 2007): 434-463.
  • “A History of Anatomy Theaters in Sixteenth-Century Padua,” Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 59, no. 3 (2004): 375-412.
  • "Elite and Vernacular Medicine: The Practices and Epistemologies of Midwives and Medical Men, 1550-1700", co-authored with Bridgette Sheridan, in Masculinities, Childhood, Violence: Attending to Early Modern Women—and Men: Proceedings of the 2006 Symposium, eds. Amy E. Leonard and Karen L. Nelson, forthcoming.
  • "Renaissance Surgeons: Anatomy, Manual Skill, and the Visual Arts," Early Modern Medicine and Natural Philosophy, eds. P. Distelzweig, B. Goldberg, and E. Ragland (New York: Springer, 2016) 43-58.
  • "Sex, Medicine, and Disease: Welcoming Wombs and Vernacular Anatomies" A Cultural History of Sexuality: the Renaissance, ed. Bette Talvacchia (Oxford, New York: Berg, 2011), 113-136.
  • "Practical Experience in Anatomy," The Body as Object and Instrument of Knowledge: Embodied Empiricism in Early Modern Science, eds. Ofer Gal, Charles T. Wolfe (Sydney: Springer, 2010), 33-58.
  • "Civility, Comportment, and the Anatomy Theater: Girolamo Fabrici and His Medical Students in Renaissance Padua," Renaissance Quarterly (July 2007): 434-463.
  • "The Renaissance," Gender Myths and Beliefs and Scientific Research, ed. Sue Rosser (ABC-CLIO Inc., 2008), 31-43.
  • "Health," co-authored with Narin Hassan, Gender Myths and Beliefs and Scientific Research, ed. Sue Rosser (ABC-CLIO Inc., 2008), 181-186.
  • "A History of Anatomy Theaters in Sixteenth-Century Padua," Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, 59, no. 3 (2004): 375-412.
GRANTS & AWARDS

2017

  • American Philosophical Society, Franklin Research Grant: summer research
  • VeniceGladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, Research in Venice

2012-2013

  • Committee on Faculty Research (CFR) grant to promote research: May 2013

2007-2008

  • Villa i Tatti Fellowship, Harvard University, September 2007-June 2008
  • American Council of Learned Societies, Fellowship, September 2007-July 2008

2003-2006

  • Boston Countway Library of Medicine, Fellowship, December 2005, May-June 2006
  • NEH Summer Stipend, May-August, 2005
  • Francis Bacon Fellow, Huntington Library, June-August, 2005
  • Renaissance Society of America, travel grant, May 2005
  • Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, Research in Venice, May-June, 2004
WORK IN PROGRESS

Professor Klestinec's new research examines the shift in the late Renaissance to a conception of the body as solid, with structures, surfaces and boundaries that could be manipulated by practitioners. Physicians for centuries had emphasized the four humors—black bile, yellow bile, phlegm and blood—and the matter theory that related these humors to the four qualities of hot, cold, wet and dry. Yet, for many Renaissance practitioners—educated surgeons, barbers and the makers of cosmetics, wigs, and prosthetics of all kinds—the body was perceived as a solid one, prompting theoretical and practical questions about how the health of the body should be restored by manipulating the body’s structures and surfaces, not its internal humoral balance. This project explores how the solid body emerged with new significance during the early modern period as a consequence of several interrelated forces: the alliances between medical practitioners and artisans, the anatomical culture of the period, and the medical marketplace.