LuMing Mao

Lu Ming MaoDepartment Chair
Professor of English and Asian/Asian American Studies

>On Leave Fall 2017 and Spring 2018<

356 Bachelor Hall
Oxford Campus
(513) 529 5221
maolr@miamioh.edu

EDUCATION

Ph.D., University of Minnesota

M.A., University of Minnesota

B.A., East China Normal University

TEACHING INTERESTS
  • History of Rhetoric and Comparative Rhetoric
  • Ethnic Rhetoric, Asian American Rhetoric, and Chinese Rhetoric
  • Writings in Translingual and Transcultural Spaces
  • Global English and Minority Languages
  • Pragmatics, Politeness Studies, and Critical Discourse Analysis
RESEARCH INTERESTS
  • Comparative Rhetoric and Ethnic Rhetoric
  • Asian American Rhetoric and Chinese American Rhetoric
  • Writings in Translingual and Transcultural Spaces and Global English
  • Pragmatics and Critical Discourse Analysis
SELECTED PUBLICATIONS (SINCE 2000)

Books and Edited Collections:

  • Comparative Rhetoric: Traversing Rhetorical Times, Places, and Spaces. London: Routledge, 2014.
  • 中美混合修辞的崛起—兼读中式签语饼(Reading Chinese Fortune Cookie: The Making of Chinese American Rhetoric). Trans. Jianfeng Wang. With a new introduction to the Chinese edition. Shanghai: Fudan University Press, 2013.
  • Comparative Rhetoric. Special Issue. Rhetoric Society Quarterly 43.3 (2013): 209-309. Guest Editor.
  • Studying Chinese Rhetoric in the Twenty-First Century. College English 72: 4 (March 2010): 329-429. Guest Editor.
  • Symposium: Comparative Rhetorical Studies in the New Contact Zone: Chinese Rhetoric Reimagined. College Composition and Communication 60: 4 (June 2009):W32-W121(co-edited with C. Jan Swearingen).
  • Representations: Doing Asian American Rhetoric. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2008 (co-edited with Morris Young). Recipient of Honorable Mention for the MLA 2009 Mina P. Shaughnessy Prize. (Reviewed in: Journal of Language, Identity, and Education 9 (2010): 282-85.)
  • Reading Chinese Fortune Cookie: The Making of Chinese American Rhetoric. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2006. (Reviewed in: Composition Studies 35:1 (2007): 129-32;College Composition and Communication 59:1 (2007): 128-38; Rhetoric Review26:4(2007): 459-62; Rhetoric Society Quarterly 38: 1 (2008): 118-21; Quarterly Journal of Speech 95: 1 (2009): 356-59.)

Journal Articles and Book Chapters (Since 2000)

  • “Thinking Beyond Aristotle: The Turn to How in Comparative Rhetoric.” PMLA 129.3 (May 2014): 448-55.
  • “From the Spread of English to the Formation of an Indigenous Rhetoric.” Reworking English in Rhetoric and Composition: Global Interrogations, Local Interventions. Ed. Bruce Horner and Karen Kopelson. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP. 77-89. 
  • “The Making of Chinese American Rhetoric.” Trans. Jianfeng Wang. Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric 181.1 (2014): 26-40. 
  • “Redefining Indigenous Rhetoric: From Places of Origin to Translingual Spaces of Interdependence-in-Difference.” Rhetoric and Writing across Language Boundaries. Ed. Suresh Canagarajah. Routledge, 2013. 47-56.
  • “Writing the Other into Histories of Rhetoric: Theorizing the Art of Recontextualization.” Re/Theorizing Writing Histories of Rhetorics. Ed. Michelle Ballif. Southern Illinois UP,  2013. 41-57.
  • “Economies of Writing Writ Large: The Rhetoric of Cultural Nationalism.” JAC 32.3-4 (2012): 513-39.
  • “Illustrating Comparative Rhetoric through a Socratic Parable.” Contemporary Rhetoric 164.2 (2011): 1-7.
  • “The Rhetoric of Responsibility: Practicing the Art of Recontextualization.” Rhetoric Review 30.2 (2011): 119-20; 131-32.
  • “Doing Comparative Rhetoric Responsibly.” Rhetoric Society Quarterly 41.1 (2011): 64-69.
  • “‘Why Don’t We Speak with an Accent?’: Practicing Interdependence-in-Difference.”Cross-Language Relations in Composition. Ed. Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, and Paul Matsuda. Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2010. 189-95.
  • “Searching for the Way: Between the Whats and the Wheres of Chinese Rhetoric.”College English 72: 4 (March 2010): 329-49.
  • “Conversation with Haivan V. Hoang and LuMing Mao.” Conversations in Cultural Rhetoric and Composition Studies. Ed. Keith Gilyard and Victor E. Taylor. Aurora, CO: Davies Group Publishers, 2009. 105-124.
  • “Introduction: Double Trouble: Seeing Chinese Rhetoric through Its Own Lens” (with C. Jan Swearingen). Symposium: Comparative Rhetorical Studies in the New Contact Zone: Chinese Rhetoric Reimagined. Ed. C. Jan Swearingen and LuMing Mao. College Composition and Communication 60: 4 (June 2009): W32-W44.
  • “Returning to Yin and Yang: From Terms of Opposites to Interdependence-in-Difference.” Symposium: Comparative Rhetorical Studies in the New Contact Zone: Chinese Rhetoric Reimagined. Ed. C. Jan Swearingen and LuMing Mao. College Composition and Communication 60: 4 (June 2009): W45-W56.
  • “Afterword: A Dialogue on Dialectic and Other Double Matters” (C. Jan Swearingen).Symposium: Comparative Rhetorical Studies in the New Contact Zone: Chinese Rhetoric Reimagined. Ed. C. Jan Swearingen and LuMing Mao. College Composition and Communication 60: 4 (June 2009): W114-W21.
  • “Introduction: Performing Asian American Rhetoric into the American Imaginary” (with Morris Young). Representations: Doing Asian American Rhetoric. Ed. LuMing Mao and Morris Young. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2008. 1-22.
  • “Afterword: Toward a Theory of Asian American Rhetoric: What Is to Be Done?” (with Morris Young). Representations: Doing Asian American Rhetoric. Ed. LuMing Mao and Morris Young. Logan, UT: Utah State UP, 2008. 323-32.
  • “Studying the Chinese Rhetorical Tradition in the Present: Re-presenting the Native’s Point of View.” College English 69.3 (January 2007): 216-37. Recipient of the 2007 Richard Ohmann Award.
  • “Principles and Rules.” Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. 2nd ed. Ed. Keith Brown. Oxford: Elsevier, 2005. Vol. 10. 103-104
  • “Rhetorical Borderlands: Chinese American Rhetoric in the Making.” College Composition and Communication 56 (2005): 422-65.
  • “Uniqueness or Borderlands?: The Making of Asian American Rhetorics.” Rhetoric and Ethnicity. Ed. Keith Gilyard and Vorris Nunley. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton, 2004. 46-55.
  • “Reflective Encounters: Illustrating Comparative Rhetoric.” Style 37 (Winter 2003): 401-425.
  • “Re-clustering Traditional Academic Discourse: Alternating with Confucian Discourse.” ALT DIS: Alternative Discourses and the Academy. Ed. Helen Fox, Christopher Schroeder, and Patricia Bizzell. Portsmouth, NH: Boynton, 2002. 112-25.
  • “What’s in a Name? That Which Is Called ‘Rhetoric’ Would in the Analects Mean ‘Participatory Discourse.’” Festschrift. Ed. Anna A. Grotans, et al. Goeppinger: Verlag, 2001. 506-22.
  • “What to Say to Someone Who Pays for Your Service: The Use of Address Terms in the Service Industry in Shanghai.” Chicago Linguistics Society Proceedings (35) 2000: 81-88.
WORK IN PROGRESS

LuMing Mao is currently involved in two major projects: he is writing a book, Searching for a Tertium Quid: Studying Chinese Rhetoric in the Present, and he is co-editing, with Jody Enders, Robert Hariman, Susan Jarratt, Andrea Lunsford, and Jacqueline Jones Royster, The Norton Anthology of Rhetoric and Writing.