Creative Writing Classroom

Creative Writing Graduate Courses

Current Offerings – Fall 2017

ENG 631A Writing in the Genres – Poetry, Dr. cheek, M 1:15 – 4:05 p.m. 

Study and practice in creative writing, with attention to formal and conceptual concerns. Attendance at visiting writers’ talks and readings is expected as part of the course. Emphasis on peer and mentor critiques of student work and on revision of a manuscript, with the goal of producing a portfolio of professional quality creative writing.

ENG 631B Writing in the Genres – Prose, Dr. Bates, R 4:25 – 7:15 p.m. 

Study and practice in creative writing, with attention to formal and conceptual concerns. Attendance at visiting writers’ talks and readings is expected as part of the course. Emphasis on peer and mentor critiques of student work and on revision of a manuscript, with the goal of producing a portfolio of professional quality creative writing.

Intra-disciplinary Seminar in English Studies 
ENG 710 Threshold Concepts and Knowledge Transfer Across Disciplines and Contexts, Dr. Wardle T 1:15 – 4:05 p.m. 

In this seminar, students will be introduced to two complimentary areas of research and theory. Threshold concepts are concepts critical for epistemological participation in a discipline; they are troublesome for learners, and not easily taught or assessed. However, they are essential for learners who wish to be able to "transfer"--or, more accurately--repurpose and build on what they learn, in order to make meaningful contributions within and across disciplinary communities of practice.  Graduate students from all areas of English Studies who enroll in this seminar will examine their field's threshold concepts, perhaps engaging in crowd-sourced wiki projects with scholars from across the country, and consider how to design courses and assignments in their disciplines that promote deep learning across time and contexts.   

Recent Courses

ENG 650: Graduate Fiction Workshop (Roley)

Study and practice in writing fiction, with attention to subtle aspects of character development, structure, story, point of view, figuration, tone, style, etc. Emphasis on group critiquing student work and on revising manuscripts, with the goal of producing a portfolio of professional quality contemporary fiction.

ENG 652A: Issues in Creative Writing – Hybrid Forms (cheek)

A class for all graduate students (fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, literature, composition and rhetoric, fine art) keen to explore intersections between their own disciplinary genres and other disciplinary boundaries; e.g nontraditional, cross-genre structures of fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, and intermedia. There will be opportunities both to collaborate and to produce individual work. Together, we will produce critical and creative responses to hybrid forms such as mutant journalism, the prosimetric (the prose poem, the haibun), short documentary, storytelling through word and image (photographic, graphic &c) sequences (online, on paper, on video), hybrid memoir, lyric essay, spoken word performance (both live and pre-recorded, monologue, poets theater, multi-voice sound compositions, podcast &c); by writers such as Claudia Rankine, Caroline Bergvall, Douglas Kearney, Lydia Davis, Coco Fusco and Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Atom-R, Black Took Collective, Kaia Sand, Anne Boyer, JR Carpenter and Jeff Sharlet, together with texts brought onto the class reading list by those taking the course. Assignments will only use available / lo-tec. No technical know-how required. Bring curiosity, generosity, and creative energy.

ENG 652B: Creative Nonfiction Workshop. (Hernández)

The priority in this workshop will be your works-in-progress. You will draft, revise, read each other’s work and offer written and oral critiques. In addition, we will read four works of creative nonfiction and study, in-depth, the forms these authors have chosen from the lyric memoir to cultural criticism. We will focus on the techniques of creating a persona in a nonfiction text, crafting a story line from life events, and weaving research with scenes. Creative responses to texts and other brief writing assignments, both in-class and out, will supplement the readings and critiques.