Courses in Russian that Qualify for the Miami Plan

CAS-A Requirement:

RUS 101 - Beginner Russian I (4)
RUS 102 - Beginner Russian II (4)
RUS 201 - Intermediate Russian I (3)
RUS 202 - Intermediate Russian II (3)

CAS-B Requirement:

RUS 137 - Russian Folklore (3)
RUS 250 - Topics in Russian Literature in English Translation (3; maximum 9)
RUS 251 - The Eastern European Vampire Tradition in Folklore, History, and Literature (3)
RUS 253 - Jewish Identity and Russian Literature (3)
RUS 255 - Russian Literature in English Translation From Pushkin to Dostoevsky (3)
RUS 256 - Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov (3)
RUS 257 - Russian Literature in English Translation: From Pasternak to the Present (3)
RUS 263 - Soviet & Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
RUS 272 - Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe: An Introduction through Literature and Film (3)

Foundation IIB (Humanities):

RUS 133 - Imagining Russia (3)
RUS 137 - Russian Folklore (3)
RUS 212 - Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism (3)
RUS 254 - Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)
RUS 255 - Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (3)

Foundation IIIB (Global Courses):

RUS 133 - Imagining Russia (3)
RUS 137 - Russian Folklore (3)

Cultural Perspective:

RUS 133 - Imagining Russia (3)
RUS 137 - Russian Folklore (3)
RUS 212 - Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism (3)
RUS 254 - Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)

Historical Perspective:

RUS 133 - Imagining Russia (3)
RUS 212 - Secular Jewish Culture From the Enlightenment to Zionism (3)
RUS 254 - Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies (3)

Thematic Sequences:

The Russian minor counts as a thematic sequence.

RUS 1: Russia and the Soviet Union
(Not open to Russian majors or majors in the Departments of History or Political Science.)

Examines Russian culture, society, and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective, including major Russian literary works, historical patterns, and political leaders and parties from the 10th century to the present. By considering this interaction, you gain meaningful insights into the development of Russia as well as acquire useful perspectives on Western society.

RUS/ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (MPF) (3), or
RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov (3); and

HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3), or
HST 375 Russia and the USSR from 1855 to the Present (3); or
HST 470 Topics in Russian History (3); or HST 475 Images of Russia At Home and Abroad: 16th Century to Present (3); and

POL/RUS 230 Topics in Russian Culture and Civilization (3); or
POL 331 Development of the Soviet Polity (3), or
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3), or
POL 430B Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe (4)

RUS 2: Russian Culture
(Not open to Russian majors.)

Examines Russian culture from the point of view of artistic media, including major literary works, films, and varieties of folkloric expression. Russian folklore, film, and literature often explore some of the same issues, central to the society they reflect, like rebellion and revolution, alienation and the creation of a community, and the intricacies of social and sexual relationships. Through the study of diverse elite and popular approaches to these topics, you gain an appreciation of some pervasive Russian attitudes and concerns.

RUS 137 Russian Folklore (MPF) (3), or
RUS/ ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (MPF) (3); and

RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation: Tolstoy to Nabakov (3), or
RUS 257 Russian Literature in English Translation: Pasternak to Present (3); and

FST/ RUS 263 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)

RUS 3: Developing Language Skills in Russian
(Not open to Russian majors.)

For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Russian language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from textbooks, fiction, the Internet and journalism as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

RUS 201 Intermediate Russian (3)
RUS 202 Intermediate Russian (3)
RUS 301 Advanced Russian (3)

Capstone Experience:

RUS 401 St. Petersburg: History, Literature, Culture (3)