Dr. Stephen Norris

Contact Information

History Department
Room 240 Upham Hall
Oxford, OH 45056
513 529 2615
Office hours:  Room 332 Harrison, W 1-3; Room 240 Upham TR 2:45-3:00; or by appointment
Stephen Norris
Title: 

Professor of History

Interim Director, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies

Education: 

PhD 2002, University of Virginia

MA, University of Virginia

BA, Millikin University

Teaching and Research Interests: 
  • Russian history
  • Nationalism
  • Visual history
  • Film and History
Courses Recently Taught: 
  • HST/FST 252 Film and History
  • HST 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies 
  • HST 296 World History since 1945
  • HST 374 History of the Russian Empire 
  • HST 375 The Soviet Union and Beyond
  • HST 378 20th Century Eastern Europe
  • HST 428/528 Russia’s War and Peace
  • HST 670 Graduate Colloquium: History and Imagery in Russia and Europe
Selected Publications: 

Books:

  • Blockbuster History in the New Russia: Movies, Memory, Patriotism (Indiana University Press, 2012)
  • A War of Images: Russian Popular Prints, Wartime Culture, and National Identity, 1812-1945 (Northern Illinois University Press, 2006)

Edited Volumes:

  • Russia's People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500-Present (with Willard Sunderland, Indiana University Press, 2012)
  • Insiders and Outsiders in Russian Cinema (with Zara Torlone, Indiana University Press, 2008)
  • Preserving Petersburg: History, Memory, Nostalgia (with Helena Goscilo, Indiana University Press, 2008)

Recent Articles:

  • "Tolstoy's Comrades: Sergei Bondarchuk's War and Peace (1965-67) and the Origins of Brezhnev Culture" in Lorna Fitzsimmons, ed., Tolstoy on Screen (Evanston: Northwestern University Press, 2014): 155-177.
  • "Palace of Soviets: Andrei Andrianov's The Spy (2012)" and "Tverskaya Street: Valery Todorovsky's Hipsters (2008)" in Birgit Beumers, ed., World Film Locations: Moscow (London: Intellect Books, 2014):  122-125.
  • "The Sharp Weapon of Soviet Laughter: Boris Efimov and Visual Humor," Russian Literature 74/1-2 (2013):  31-62.
  • "Pliuvium's Unholy Trinity: Russian Nationhood, Anti-Semitism, and the Public Sphere after 1905," Experiment 19 (2013):  87-116
  • "Landscapes of Loss: The Great Patriotic War in Central Asian Cinema" in Michael Rouland and Gulnara Abikeyeva, eds., Central Asian Cinema: Rewriting Cultural Histories (London: I.B. Tauris, 2013):  73-87
  • "A Kiss for the KGB: Putin as Cinematic Hero" in Birgit Beumers, ed., Russia's New fin de siècle: Contemporary Culture Between Past and Present (London: Intellect Books, 2013):  156-174
  • "Blessed Films: The Russian Orthodox Church and Patriotic Culture in the 2000s" in Christian Schmitt and Liliya Berezhnaya, eds., Iconic Turns: Religion and Nation in East European Films Since 1989 (Leiden: Brill, 2013):  65-79
  • "Patriot Games: The Ninth Company and Russian Convergent Cultures after Communism," Digital Icons: Studies in Russian, Eurasian, and Central European New Media 8 (2012):  67-96
  • "Boney, the Transnational Agent of Nationhood: Visual Culture and Total War in 1812," Comparativ: Zeitschrift für Globalgeschichte und vergleichende Gesellschaftsforschung 22/4 (2012):  46-70
  • "Nomadic Nationhood: Cinema and Remembrance in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan," Ab Imperio 13/2 (2012):  378-402
  • "Laughter's Weapon and Pandora's Box: Boris Efimov in the Khrushchev Era" in David Goldfrank and Pavel Lyssakov, eds., Cultural Cabaret: Russian and American Essays in Memory of Richard Stites (Washington, DC: New Academic Press, 2012):  105-138
  • "Memory for Sale: Victory Day 2010 and Russian Remembrance," Soviet and Post-Soviet Review 38 (2011);  201-29
  • "Family, Fatherland, and Faith: The Power of Nikita Mikhalkov's Celebrity" in Helena Goscilo and Vlad Strukov, eds., Celebrity and Glamour in Contemporary Russia: Shocking Chic (London: Routledge, 2010):  107-126

Newspaper Articles:

Selected Grants and Awards: 

Miami University Associate Student Government Outstanding Professor Award, 2006

Work in Progress: 

My work studies images, nationhood, and propaganda in Russia during the 19th and 20th centuries.  My current research project is entitled Communism's Cartoonist: Boris Efimov and the Soviet Century.  Boris Efimov (1900-2008) was the most significant political caricaturist in Soviet history.  His career began in Civil War Ukraine when he was just a teenager before he moved to Moscow in 1922 and worked as a cartoonist for major Soviet publications such as Izvestiia and Krokodil.  He continued to draw caricatures for them until the collapse of the USSR in 1991.  My project on Efimov involves an exhibition of his works, an album containing examples of his cartoons, and a biography of his life and work.

I would be happy to work with graduate and undergraduate students on research topics related to modern Russian history, modern European history, and visual history.  Please contact me with any questions.