Dr. Stephen Norris

Stephen Norris

Walter E. Havighurst Professor of Russian History

240 Upham Hall
Oxford, OH 45056
513-529-2615
Office hours by appointment - Google Calendar

Director, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies

Education

  • PhD 2002, University of Virginia
  • MA, University of Virginia
  • BA, Millikin University

Teaching and Research Interests

  • Russian history
  • Nationalism
  • Visual history
  • Film and History

Courses Recently Taught 

  • HST 206 Historical Inquiry
  • HST 231 Genocides in the 20th Century
  • HST/FST 252 History at the Movies
  • HST 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies 
  • HST 270 A History of the World Wars
  • HST 296 World History since 1945
  • HST 374 History of the Russian Empire 
  • HST 375 The Soviet Union and Beyond
  • HST 428/528 History through LIterature

Selected Publications 

Books

  • The History Painters: Art, History, and the Making of Russian National Identity (under contract with Bloomsbury, London and New York, forthcoming 2022).
  • Blockbuster History in the New Russia: Movies, Memory, Patriotism (Indiana University Press, 2012)
  • A War of Images: Russian Popular Prints, Wartime Culture, and National Identity, 1812-1945 (Northern Illinois University Press, 2006)

Edited Volumes

  • The Akunin Project: The Mysteries and Histories of Russia's Bestselling Author (co-edited volume with Elena Baraban).  University of Toronto Press, 2021.
  • Museums of Communism: New Memory Sites in Central and Eastern Europe  (Indiana University Press, 2020)
  • The City in Russian Culture (co-edited volume with Pavel Lyssakov). London:  Routledge, 2018.
  • Russia's People of Empire: Life Stories from Eurasia, 1500-Present (with Willard Sunderland, Indiana University Press, 2012)
  • Insiders and Outsiders in Russian Cinema (with Zara Torlone, Indiana University Press, 2008)
  • Preserving Petersburg: History, Memory, Nostalgia (with Helena Goscilo, Indiana University Press, 2008)

Recent Articles

  • “Caricatured Empire” in Joan Neuberger, Valerie Kivelson, and Sergei Kozlov, eds., Picturing Russian Empire (NY: Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2022).

  •  “The War Film and Memory Politics in Putin’s Russia” in David Hoffmann, ed., The Memory of the Second World War in the Soviet Union and Contemporary Russia (London: Routledge, forthcoming 2022).

  •  “The Great Patriotic Serial:  Shtrafbat [Penal Battalion], Historical Taboos, and the Beginnings of the New National Idea” in Sasha Prokhorov, Elena Prokhorova, and Rimgaila Salys, eds., Contemporary Russian Television (Boston:  Academic Studies Press, 2021).

  • “War, Cinema, and the Politics of Memory in Putin 2.0 Culture” in Anton Weiss-Wendt and Nanci Adler, eds., The Future of the Soviet Past (Bloomington:  Indiana University Press, forthcoming, 2021) 

  • “Young Soldiers at Play:  The Red Army Soldier as Icon” in Marina Balina and Serguei Oushakine, eds., The Pedagogy of Images:  Early Soviet Children’s Books (University of Toronto Press, forthcoming 2021):  445-466. 

  • “The Second World War, Soviet Sports and Furious Space Walks: Soft Power and Nation Branding in the Putin 2.0 Era” in Stephanie Dennison and Rachel Dwyer, eds., Cinema and Soft Power: Configuring the National and Transnational in Geo-Politics (Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2021): 119-39.

  • “Two Worlds:  Boris Efimov, Soviet Political Caricature, and the Construction of the Long Cold War” in Aga Skrodzka, Xiaoning Lu, and Kasia Marciniak, eds., The Oxford Handbook of Communist Visual Cultures (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 2020): 519-541.  

  • “On Russian Cinema Going West (and East):  Fedor Bondarchuk’s Stalingrad (2013) and Blockbuster History” in Andy Byford, Connor Doak, and Stephen Hutchings, eds., Transnational Russian Studies (Liverpool:  Liverpool University Press, 2020):  197-212.

  • “Defenders of the Russian Land:  Viktor Vasnetsov’s Warriors and Russia’s Bulwark Myth” in Heidi Hein-Kircher and Lilya Berezhnaya, eds., Rampart Nations:  Bulwark Myths in East European Multiconfessional Societies in the Age of Nationalism (Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2019):  319-343. 

  • “My Good Hans” in Rimgaila Salys, ed., The Russian Cinema Reader, Volume III.  (Boston:  Academic Studies Press, 2019):  344-361.

     

Online Articles

Selected Grants and Awards 

  • Miami University Distinguished Scholar Award, 2019
  • Miami University College of Arts and Science Distinguished Educator, 2017
  • Miami University Associate Student Government Outstanding Professor Award, 2006

Work in Progress 

My work studies images, nationhood, and propaganda in Russia during the 19th and 20th centuries.  My current research project is entitled Communism's Cartoonist: Boris Efimov and the Soviet Century.  Boris Efimov (1900-2008) was the most significant political caricaturist in Soviet history.  His career began in Civil War Ukraine when he was just a teenager before he moved to Moscow in 1922 and worked as a cartoonist for major Soviet publications such as Izvestiia and Krokodil.  He continued to draw caricatures for them until the collapse of the USSR in 1991.  My project on Efimov involves an exhibition of his works, an album containing examples of his cartoons, and a biography of his life and work.

I would be happy to work with graduate and undergraduate students on research topics related to modern Russian history, modern European history, and visual history.  Please contact me with any questions.