Dr. Susan V. Spellman

Contact Information

Hamilton Campus
Room 576 Mosler Hall
Hamilton, OH 45011
513 785 1876
Susan Spellman
Title: 

Associate Professor of History

Affiliate of Global and Intercultural Studies (American Studies Program)

Education: 

PhD 2009, Carnegie Mellon University

MA, Miami University

BA, Kent State University

Teaching and Research Interests: 
  • 19th and 20th C. U.S. social and cultural
  • History of Capitalism
  • Consumerism
  • History of technology
Courses Recently Taught: 
  • HST 111 Survey of U.S History
  • HST 112 Survey of U.S. History
  • HST 206 Introduction to Historical Inquiry
  • HST 279 U.S. Consumerism, 1890-Present
  • HST 290 American Business History
Selected Publications: 
  • Cornering the Market: Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business, Oxford University Press, 2016.
  • "Trust Brokers: Traveling Grocery Salesmen and Confidence in Nineteenth-Century Trade," Enterprise & Society, June 2012.
  • "All the Comforts of Home: The Domestication of the Service Station Industry, 1920-1940," Journal of Popular Culture, vol. 37, no. 3, 2004
  • Associate Editor (with Allan Winkler), Encyclopedia of American History, Postwar 1946-1968, Vol. 9, under the general editorship of Gary B. Nash, Facts on File, Inc., 2003
Selected Grants and Awards: 
  • J. Franklin Jameson Fellowship, American Historical Association and the Library of Congress, 2012
  • Smithsonian Predoctoral Fellowship, National Museum of American History, 2007
  • Alfred D. Chandler, Jr., Traveling Fellowship in Business History, Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, 2006
  • Russel B. Nye Award for Best Article published in Journal of Popular Culture, 2005
Work in Progress: 

Dr. Spellman's work intersects the history of capitalism, in addition to social, cultural, consumer, and technology history.  Her book, Cornering the Market: Independent Grocers and Innovation in American Small Business, 1860-1940 (Oxford University Press), considers the ways in which small grocers--often portrayed as holdovers from a nostalgic past--were key agents of a "modernizing" impulse in American capitalism from the Civil War era to the New Deal.  She has begun work on a second book project, Go-Getters! Ambition and the American Business Traveler, from the Steamboat to the Frequent Flyer

Website:  blogs.miamioh.edu/spellmsv/