Fall Semester

FALL SEMESTER 2017-18

HST 111 - AA  Survey of American History I – MW 11:40-12:35
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Lindsay Schakenbach Regele

HST 112 - A Survey of American History II
Section A - MW 8:30-9:50
Section B - TR 8:30-9:50
Dr. Adrienne Chudzinski

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.

Together, HST 111 and 112 provide students with a basic introduction to the major issues and questions in the history of the geographical region covered by the present-day United States of America.  Specifically, HST 111 deals with the American past between 1492, the year in which Spain "discovered" the Western Hemisphere, and the Era of Reconstruction (1865-1877).  HST 112 covers the past century, during which time the United States industrialized and developed into a world power.  While each course will ask you to learn about specific people, places and events, the major concern will be to ask you to think about why we are what we are today.  While we will focus on the central events of our collective past--in HST 111 the founding of the colonies, the establishment of black slavery, the American Revolution, the Civil War and Reconstruction; in HST 112 immigration, industrialization, urban growth, 20th century reform, and the impact of World Wars I and II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War--we will do so from the perspectives of recent scholarship by historians concerned with questions of gender, race, environmentalism, class and region.  Although the basic structure of this course will be traditional, the content will be more unusual.  HST 111 and 112 may be taken singly, in sequence or out of sequence.

HST 121 Western Civilization I – TR 10:05-11:25
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Charlotte Goldy

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major: HST 121: pre-1500 (for students entering Miami 2011-12 through 2014-15)

In a world of growing specialization and compartmentalization, students face increasing difficulty relating various areas of knowledge to one another and to themselves.  HST 121 (antiquity to 1500) and 122 (1500 to the present) cannot provide a complete answer to this problem, but they are a good start.  These courses  present a broad, multi-faceted approach to the study of western civilization  over the course of nearly three millennia.  Their purpose is to survey the major societal issues and cultural themes that have defined the concepts of humanity and society in the western world.  In aiming at this objective, these courses afford a degree of perspective which assists the student in both relating diverse information to central themes and in understanding his or her relationship to a culture and an age.  Texts and techniques will vary with the individual instructor.  HST 121 and HST 122 may be taken singly, in sequence or out of sequence.

HST 197  World History to 1500 – MW 10:05-11:00
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Matthew Gordon

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major: Geographical Diversity; pre-1500 (for students entering Miami 2011-12 through 2014-15)

This course in ancient and medieval global history focuses on politics, political actors, political events and political institutions.  We will concentrate, using primary documents and material evidence, on the principal form of pre-modern political organization: the empire.  We will consider the rise of empires and imperial societies in four particular regions from the period 400 to 1500  CE, or what is often called the "medieval" period:  the Roman Mediterranean, the Islamic Near East, Latin Christian Europe and the Central Asian steppe.

HST 198 World History since 1500 – TR 2:50-4:10
Dr. William Brown

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major:  Geographical Diversity (for students entering Miami 2011-12 through 2014-15)

Emphasizes the growing interrelatedness of the regions of the world since the time of the European voyages of exploration, and accelerating since the industrial and ideological revolutions of the late eighteenth century.

HST 206  Historical Inquiry – MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Renée Baernstein

Introduction to essential skills in investigating and interpreting the past.  Course stresses active participation, writing, and intensive reading of primary documents and secondary literature.  Required of History Majors.

HST 212  United States History since 1945 - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Adrienne Chudzinski
History Major:  United States

In-depth examination of political, social, economic, and cultural/intellectual developments in the U.S. since the end of World War II.

AMS/HST 216  Introduction to Public History - MW 10:05-11:25
Dr. Helen Sheumaker
History Major:  United States

Do history that matters.  In this course, you will research and write a biography of a Miami University student or faculty member who served in the Civil War for a Miami University Alumni Association website.  You will also research at least one individual buried in the Doty Pioneer Cemetery in Oxford Township for the Oxford Museum Association.  We will be creating an interactive cemetery map for this organization.  This course introduces students to conducting primary research using genealogical and historical databases, reading primary documents, and writing popular history.

BWS/HST 221  African American History -- TR 10:05-11:25
Dr. Nishani Frazier
History Major:  United States
Thematic Sequence (ENG 8): African American History and Literature
Miami Plan Intercultural Requirement

HST 221 is a survey of the African-American experience in the United States, from African origins to the present.  The course is designed to explore and explain how the African American presence is intricately tied with the development of freedom in the United States, and how the African American experience becomes the prevailing barometer for determining the extent to which the United States has or has not reached the goal of its democratic principles.  This course explains how African Americans navigate, engage, or avoid interactions with white Americans, how African Americans relate to other communities, and more importantly how African Americans interact with each other.  Particular attention will be given to the aspects of racial uplift, gender relations, and cultural/ community development.  Ultimately, this course will not only give you an understanding of the development of the black community and the search for freedom in the United States, it will also help you to understand how the history of African people in the United States has become a complicated, dynamic, and ever changing process by which black people come to understand themselves and the world around them.

BWS/HST 224  Africa to 1884 – TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah
Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major: Africa; Pre-Modern

This course is a general survey of the history of Africa, south of the Sahara, from the earliest times to the end of the nineteenth century.  Through a rough chronological order, it concentrates on the examination of six broad themes:  ancient and medieval African civilizations; Bantu and Luo migrations; African cultures; East Africa and the Orient; South Africa to 1870; and disorder and readjustment between the fifteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Time will also be spent on sources of African history so that students can effectively evaluate the methods and approaches used in understanding Africa’s past.

HST 238  Food in History - MW 1:15-2:35
Dr. Peggy Shaffer

This course provides an environmental history of food examining the origins and impact of our global food system.  Beginning in prehistory, students will examine the emergence of fire, cooking and the impact of the agricultural revolution and then explore the environmental, economic, social, and cultural implications of selected foods and food types as they spread across the globe.  Selected foods and themes could include:  maize and the Columbian Exchange; coffee, tea and empire; sugar, slavery and capitalism; bread and revolution; potatoes and immigration; pork and industrialization; chocolate and leisure; bananas and migrant labor; Coca Cola and globalization; Chinese food and ethnicity.  The goal is to understand food as both a biological necessity and a historical force linked to empire, markets, and issues of belonging and identity.

HST 245 The Making of Modern Europe, 1450-1750
Section A:  TR 11:40-1:00
Section B:  TR 8:30-9:50
Dr. William Brown

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major: Europe; Pre-Modern

Survey of European history in global context from the Renaissance through the Enlightenment.  Emphasis on political, cultural, and religious change in the first global age.  Class also introduces students to the skills of historical thinking, and why they are essential to living in a global age.

HST 246  Survey of Medieval History - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Charlotte Goldy
Thematic Sequence (HST 1): Medieval Studies
Medieval Studies Minor
History Major: Europe; Pre-Modern, pre-1500

There is more to the Middle Ages than just being "in the middle."  HST 246 examines both the High and Later Middle Ages (ca. 1000 - ca. 1500) with the expansion of Europe and its encounters with other cultures; the development of the papal and feudal monarchies, representational and authoritarian governments, and national identity; a pan-European culture and a national culture; modern law and persecutions; the Black Death and transition to "modern" Europe.  Lectures are integrated with informal discussion and visual images of the time.  Your grade will be based on at-home essay exams and short reading responses.

HST 296  World History since 1945 - TR 10:05-11:00
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Sheldon Anderson

HST 296  World History since 1945, Section B - TR 4:25-5:45
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Miami Plan Global Course Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major: Geographical Diversity

From the end of the Second World War to the present era of global interconnectedness, this course examines such issues as the Cold War, decolonization and post-colonialism, the end of the Soviet Union and its eastern bloc, shifting demographics, environmental transformation, and the accelerating competition for land and resources.

HST/REL 316  The Age of the Reformation - MW 1:15-2:35
Dr. Wietse de Boer
History Major:  Europe; Pre-Modern

In 1517, the fragile religious unity of Christian Europe was shattered for good.  This course examines the background of the Reformation and the ensuing religious revolutions of the sixteenth century, both Protestant and Catholic, in their social, political and religious contexts.  Luther, Calvin, Swingli, the Radical Reformers, and Catholic Reformers formulated different responses to similar problems; we will compare and contrast them.  Topics may include:  medieval reform movements and heresies; popular religion; the debates over clerical celibacy, free will, and the sacraments; social discipline and the modern state; family and women; the missions to the New World; and the witch craze.

HST/LAS 319  Revolution in Latin America - TR 4:25-5:45
Dr. Lance Ingwersen
History Major:  Latin America

History of modern Latin America through the experience of revolution and social movement in the 20th century.  Focus on popular revolutionary experiences in Mexico, Cuba, and Nicaragua; changing women's roles in revolutionary struggle; and new social movements across the region that arose as a response to issues of inequality and injustice.

HST 324  Eurasian Nomads and History - WF 11:40-1:00
Dr. Daniel Prior
Thematic Sequence (HST 3 and POL 7): Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
History Major:  Asia; Pre-Modern, pre-1500

In this course we will be exploring a huge subset of humanity that, though sometimes marginalized by historians, has been central to world history.  Through trade, diplomacy, ethnic and cultural currents, raiding, and conquests, the horse-riding herders of the Eurasian steppes have played crucial roles in the destinies of the sedentary civilizations of the Eurasian periphery, including China, the Near East, and Russia.  We will discuss the nature of nomadism; the social structures, gender relations, and forms of culture and art of nomadic peoples; and how nomads have survived, formed armies and states, interacted with sedentary groups, passed on political and cultural traditions, and confronted modernization.  The course stresses close analysis of primary sources.

HST 333  Reconstruction of Europe since 1945 - TR 11:40-1:00
Dr. Erik Jensen
History Major:  Europe

Examines how Europe came to be divided into two political spheres sustained by dueling military alliances.  Focuses on political and economic reconstruction within the two blocs created by the Cold War divide, as well as new cultural impulses generated by changed realities of a shrunken and shattered Europe after 1945.  Examines the revolutions of 1989, the fall of the Soviet Union, and process of European unification.

HST 350E  The American West - MW 8:30-9:50
Dr. Andrew Offenburger
History Major:  United States.  See Department Advisor for DARS notation.

This course will investigate the history of westward expansion and of the resulting cultural encounters in the North America West, from the colonial era to the present.  Students will explore this history through the lived experiences of its actors--via autobiographies, memoirs, and oral histories--and by analyzing Western films and images.

HST 353  History of Chinese Civilization - TR 2:50-4:10
Dr. Yihong Pan
History Major:  Asia; Pre-Modern

Survey of Chinese civilization, its origins and evolution in political institutions, economic activity, social structure, and cultural aspects from prehistory to 1840.

HST 354  Modern Chinese History - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Yihong Pan
History Major: Asia

Modern Chinese History recounts the drastic changes and dramatic events that China had to undergo in its search for modernity.  We will examine the major forces that shaped modern China from 1600 onwards, and how people lived through this period.  The course aims at understanding the various scholarly interpretations of this history, and at enhancing critical thinking through examination of primary and secondary sources, class discussions, and various types of writing.

HST 360F  The History of the Modern Middle East - MW 1:15-2:35
Dr. Matthew Gordon
History Major:  Middle East.  See Department Advisor for DARS notation.

The course introduces students to significant patterns of modern Middle East history.  It focuses on the political history of the region:  social, economic and cultural topics will figure only secondarily.  We will also concentrate on the longer historical picture that frames the modern day, rather than contemporary issues.  The approach is chronological (beginning with the late Ottoman period).  Much of the course will turn on the respective histories of Iran, Turkey, Egypt and Lebanon.  We will also devote much attention to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.

AMS/HST 362  The Era of the American Revolution - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Lindsay Schakenbach Regele
History Major: United States; Pre-Modern

Origins, events, and legacies of the American Revolution, with particular emphasis on political and social developments.

HST 374  History of the Russian Empire - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Stephen Norris
History Major:  Europe; Pre-Modern
Thematic Sequence (HST 3 and POL 7): Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
Thematic Sequence (RUS 1): Russia and the Soviet Union

From the earliest recorded moment of its history, Russia was either the object of imperial expansion or the maker of an empire itself.  The course, which covers Russia to the Revolution of 1917, explores how the country amassed territory through peaceful means and through war.  How did the central government manage to preside for centuries over a realm of different nationalities, languages, and religions--until stagnation and unrest began to grow in the late nineteenth century?  Among major topics are the creation of Russian national identity, the significance of the expanding frontier, and the image and role of other nationalities within the empire.  Throughout the course, the question of how central power operated--despotism or otherwise--will be a constant theme.

HST 400.7  Senior Capstone:  History Honors – MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Andrew Offenburger
History Major:  Senior Capstone

Capstone for students in the History Departmental Honors program, who have completed HST 359, Junior Honors Colloquium.

HST 400S  Senior Capstone:  Midwest Shtetls - MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Steven Conn
History Major: Senior Capstone

HST 400W  Senior Capstone:  World War I -- T 2:50-5:30
Dr. Sheldon Anderson
History Major:  Senior Capstone

AMS/HST 435 Public History Practicum – MW 4:25-5:45
Dr. Helen Sheumaker
History Major:  United States

Public history is practical, applied history.  Move beyond the classroom and into the world where history and life intersect.  Research the lives of Miami University students of the 19th and 20th centuries who also served in the military.  You will be conducting intensive primary research and write several short essays for the Miami University Alumni Association website.  Women, minorities, men, generals to privates, career military to one-time service:  you'll uncover the fascinating lives of MU alumni and gain skills in writing life histories.  For the second half of the course, we will be conducting an investigation into race on campus before 1968 and creating an online exhibit.

HST/POL/RUS 436 Havighurst Colloquium:  The Russian Revolution, Religion and Society – MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Scott Kenworthy
History Major:  Europe

On the 100th anniversary of the Russian Revolution, join us for an exploration of the social turmoil and political upheavals that led to the establishment of the world's first communist regime.  This interdisciplinary seminar focuses particularly on the clash between the militant atheist Bolsheviks and the various religious traditions of the Russian Empire (Christianity, Islam and Judaism).  The colloquium will feature lectures by historians from across the country who are currently researching the Russian Revolution.  The speakers will include Donald Raleigh (Professor of History, University of North Carolina), Matthew Payne (Associate Professor of History, Emory University), Nadieszda Kizenko (Professor of History, SUNY Albany), Catherine Evtuhov (Professor of History, Columbia University), and MIchael Hickey (Professor of History, Bloomsburg University).

HST 472  Germany 1918-1945 -- TR 2:50-4:10
Dr. Erik Jensen
History Major:  Europe

Examines the most tumultuous period of modern German history, from the end of the First World War through the political and social experimentation of the 1920s to the rise of Adolf Hitler and the crimes of the Nazi regime.  This course utilizes an array of sources to address one of the central questions of the twentieth century:  Why did Germany move from being a remarkably progressive democracy in the 1920s to being an aggressively expansionist and murderous dictatorship just over one decade later?