Spring Semester

SPRING SEMESTER 2018-19

HST 112 Survey of American History II - MW 11:40-12:35
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Andrew Offenburger

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.

Together, HST 111 and 112 provide students with a basic introduction to the major issues and questions in the history of the geographical region covered by the present-day United States of America.  Specifically, HST 111 deals with the American past between 1492, the year in which Spain "discovered" the Western Hemisphere, and the Era of Reconstruction (1865-1877).  HST 112 covers the past century, during which time the United States industrialized and developed into a world power.  While each course will ask you to learn about specific people, places and events, the major concern will be to ask you to think about why we are what we are today.  While we will focus on the central events of our collective past--in HST 111 the founding of the colonies, the establishment of black slavery, the American Revolution, the Civil War and Reconstruction; in HST 112 immigration, industrialization, urban growth, 20th century reform, and the impact of World Wars I and II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War--we will do so from the perspectives of recent scholarship by historians concerned with questions of gender, race, environmentalism, class and region.  Although the basic structure of this course will be traditional, the content will be more unusual.  HST 111 and 112 may be taken singly, in sequence or out of sequence.

HST 122  Western Civilization II - TR 8:30-9:50
Dr. Sheldon Anderson
Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement

In a world of growing specialization and compartmentalization, students face increasing difficulty relating various areas of knowledge to one another and to themselves. HST 121 (antiquity to 1500) and 122 (1500 to the present) cannot provide a complete answer to this problem, but they are a good start. These courses present a broad, multi-faceted approach to the study of western civilization over the course of nearly three millennia. Their purpose is to survey the major societal issues and cultural themes that have defined the concepts of humanity and society in the western world. In aiming at this objective, these courses afford a degree of perspective which assists the student in both relating diverse information to central themes and in understanding his or her relationship to a culture and an age. Texts and techniques will vary with the individual instructor. HST 121 and HST 122 may be taken singly, in sequence or out of sequence.

HST 197  World History to 1500
Section A - MW 1:15-2:35
Section B - MW 4:25-5:45

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major: Geographical Diversity; pre-1500 (for students entering Miami 2011-12 through 2014-15)

Introduction to the origins and early development of individual civilizations prior to the period of Western European hegemony.  Stresses interdependency and interrelations among cultures, and compares social, political, and religious experiences of people with one another.

HST 198-A  World History since 1500 - TR 10:05-11:00
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. William Brown

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major:  Geographical Diversity (for students entering Miami 2011-12 through 2014-15)

Emphasizes the growing interrelatedness of the regions of the world since the time of the European voyages of exploration and accelerating since the industrial and ideological revolutions of the late eighteenth century.

HST 206  Historical Inquiry
Section A - TR 2:50-4:10; Dr. William Brown
Section B - MW 10:05-11:25; Dr. Matthew Gordon

Introduction to essential skills in investigating and interpreting the past.  Course stresses active participation, writing, and intensive reading of primary documents and secondary literature.  Required of History Majors.

AMS/HST 216  Introduction to Public History - MW 10:05-11:25
Dr. Helen Sheumaker
History Major:  United States

Public history is the history you encounter in public spaces - museums, movies, walking tours, historic sites, video games, television and web shows, web sites, and more.  This course will familiarize you to public history on campus and in the region, train you to think critically and analytically about the ways history appears in everyday life, and introduce you to the techniques and theories of public history practice.  We will be usinig a U.S. history textbook as our baseline of knowledge along with readings in public history practice and case studies, and visits to exhibits, museums, and spaces on campus and in Oxford.  There are three examinations and short writing assignments.

BWS/HST 225  The Making of Modern Africa - TR 11:40-1:00
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah
History Major:  Africa
Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.

This course is a survey of the transformation of Africa, south of the Sahara, from the time of the scramble for, and partition of, the continent among European powers in the second half of the 19th century, to the present.  Emphasis will be on economic, social, cultural, political, and intellectual features of this period.  This will be done through the reading of monographs, articles, and literary works (novels, plays, poems, etc.) on the political economy of colonialism, African experiences with colonialism, the rise and triumph of nationalism, African womanhood, popular culture and the experiences of change, and the rise and nature of post-colonial economic and political crises in the region.

HST 236  Medicine and Disease in Modern Society - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Amanda McVety

HST/CLS/POL 254  Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Zara Torlone (Classics Department)
History Major:  Europe

This course examines the major developments that have shaped Russian and Eurasian culture, society and politics over the last millennium.  The course incorporates perspectives from the social sciences, humanities and the fine arts.

IDS 259  Introduction to the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Cameron Shriver

Offers an interdisciplinary examination of the Myaamia (Miami Tribe and its citizens) as a living people and culture with a past, present and future.  Explores economic, social and political changes over time, including the period of European colonization; treaties and federal legislation and Myaamia responses; and modern issues related to the Miami Tribe of Oklahoma.  Emphasizes historical understandings of Myaamia culture and modern cultural revitalization efforts in a global context.

HST 270A  World War II and the Holocaust in the USSR - MW 1:15-2:35
Dr. Francesca Silano
History Major:  Europe

The history of the Holocaust and the Second World War on the Eastern front remains largely unknown to students in the west; yet it was in this area that many of the dynamics of violence, genocide, and ideological warfare were first implemented.  It is also in this area that the legacy of the war and the Holocaust are arguably most fiercely contested.  In this course, we will examine the history of the war and the Holocaust in the Soviet Union.  We will explore, among other things, the relationship between ideology and practice; how dynamics of violence and retribution are created; and the experiences of different actors, including generals, soldiers, POWs, Jewish men and women, and civilians.  Finally, we will consider how the war and the Holocaust are commemorated in the former Soviet Union today, and what these commenorations can tell us about our contemporary world.

HST 270D  The Mongols and Their World - MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Daniel Prior
History Major:  Asia; Pre-Modern, pre-1500

This course introduces the history of the Mongol Conquests and the Mongol Empire, from the rapid rise of Mongol power under Chinggis Khan in the 12th and 13th centuries to the long-lasting, widespread effects of Mongol rule that persisted for centuries after the dissolution of their huge empire.  We will analyze both primary and secondary sources, including perspectives of contemporary observers from Western Europe, the Near East, Central Asia, China, and Russia.  An important question we will explore is the extent to which the development of the modern world has been conditioned by processes of Eurasian integration dating from the Mongol era.

HST 275  Twentieth Century European Diplomatic History - TR 10:05-11:25
Dr. Sheldon Anderson
History Major:  Europe
Thematic Sequence (NSC 2): War - An Extension of Politics

Examines the origins of World War I and World War II, the Cold War, European unity, decolonization, the fall of communism and the Yugoslav conflict.

HST 290B  America and Global Capitalism - TR 2:50-5:10 (8-week sprint course meeting February 4-April 3)
Dr. Lindsay Schakenbach Regele

This course explores the development of capitalism from the vantage point of America (before and after it became the United States) to understand how and why it became the dominant economic system.  It will cover imperialism, the transatlantic slave trade, the Industrial Revolution, major wars and economic downturns, global consumerism, and the financialization of the economy.

HST 296  World History since 1945 - MW 10:05-11:00
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Erik Jensen

HST 296-B  World History since 1945 - TR 4:25-5:45
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Miami Plan Global Course Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major:  Geographical Diversity

From the outcome and effects of World War II to the new globalization.  The Cold War, decolonization and its lingering effects, America's numerous foreign wars, the end of the Soviet Union and its bloc, issues of food production, and climate change are examples of topics to be covered.

AMS/HST 304  History, Memory, Tradition - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Helen Sheumaker
History Major:  United States

It is not uncommon for history, memory, and tradition to be defined in simplistic terms.  People are often comforted by the sense of certainty they convey.  The past becomes a place of refuge.  This course takes a different view.  Drawing upon a broad range of disciplinary perspectives, it examines the constructed and contested nature of all three concepts.  We will critique many sites of memory--from popular film to museums, historical sites, and television.  Readings range from theoretical arguments about memory and history to case studies.  We will examine the American and the global practices of History and Memory, from Miami University's campus to global narratives of slavery to American mythologies of leaders; assignments range from analyzing episodes of Drunk History and films to student-driven topics for final papers.

HST 313  History of England to 1688 - TR 10:05-11:25
Dr. Charlotte Goldy
History Major:  Europe; Pre-Modern, pre-1500

Life of the English people from the beginning of the Middle Ages to 1688.  This semester in Oxford only, we will focus on the Middle Ages into the Tudor period (1603) looking at the development of the modern national government, the beginnings of Common Law, the merging of peoples and cultures that became "England."  Your grade will be based on out-of-class essays and reading responses.

HST 328  Italy: Machiavelli to Mussolini - MW 8:30-9:50
Dr. Wietse de Boer
History Major:  Europe

Explores Italian history from the end of the Renaissance, through the Baroque, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, and on to modernity.  Addresses questions about culture and society, identity and nationality, art and politics, and about Italy's influence world-wide.

HST 346  Medieval Jewish History - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Charlotte Goldy
History Major:  Europe; Pre-Modern, pre-1500
Jewish Studies and Medieval Studies Minors

An introduction to the history of the Jews of medieval Europe (the Ashkenaz).  Topics will include Jewish life and culture, life as a sole minority, the beginnings of Christian persecution, interaction with the Sephardic Jewish communities and comparison to life under Islam.  Understanding the European Middle Ages is crucial to understanding later society, both its cultureal and institutional achievements, and its biases and handicaps.  An understanding of Jewish history and culture gives insights into a people with a unique history and contribution to the world as well as into minority-majority relations.  Your grade will be based on out-of-class essays and reading responses.

HST 350B/ITL 350B/BWS 370B  Black Europe and Italy - TR 2:50-4:10
Dr. Sara Marzioli (French and Italian)
History Major:  Europe.  See Department Advisor for DARS notation.

Explore the cultural exchanges between Europe and the African Diaspora through music (hip hop and folk), film, photography, sculpture, painting, plays and short stories by Italian, Afro-Italian and Afro-European artists.  From Renaissance Italy through 1920s Paris and 1930s Germany, to contemporary migration in the Mediterranean and the campaigns for social integration and legal equality.  Taught in English; no prerequisite.

HST 359  Junior Honors Colloquium - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Andrew Offenburger

Introduction to some of the issues involved in the conceptualization and writing of a major history project.  Designed for students planning to write an Honors thesis in History in the senior year.  Enrollment is by invitation only; contact the instructor for more information.

HST 360.2  Violence in Africa - MW 4:25-5:45
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah
History Major:  Africa

HST 362  The Era of the American Revolution - TR 11:40-2:00 (8-week sprint course meeting February 4-April 3)
Dr. Lindsay Schakenbach Regele
History Majora;  United States; Pre-Modern

Origins, events, and legacies of the American Revolution, with particular emphasis on political and social developments.

AMS/HST 367  United States in the 1960s - TR 11:40-1:00
Dr. Nishani Frazier
History Major:  United States
Thematic Sequence (ENG 3): American Life and Culture since World War II

This course will explore the turbulent decade of the 1960s from numerous perspectives, providing students with new methods for separating myth from reality in the investigation of this much-romanticized era.  We will examine a wide array of historical topics, including Northern segregation, Civil Rights, Power Movements, Women's and Gay Liberation, Counterculture, the New Left, and the New Right.  Throughout the semester will explore the diverse perspectives of the Americans who lived through the sixties, and we will consider the decade's enduring social, cultural, and political legacies.  This class will enhance student understanding of the people and movements that defined one of the most vibrant years of American history and will move beyond the notion of the period as the epitome of "sex, drugs, and rock-n-roll."

HST 372  Native American History since 1840 - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Cameron Shriver
History Major:  United States

American Indian history from 1840 through the twentieth century and into the present.

HST 375  The Soviet Union and Beyond - MW 10:05-11:25
Dr. Francesca Silano
History Major:  Europe
Thematic Sequence (HST3 and POL7): Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies
Thematic Sequence (RUS1): Russia and the Soviet Union

The 1917 Russian Revolution created the world's first communist state, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics.  When this state collapsed in 1991, Russians attempted to build a new, democratic state.  This course explores the history of communism in Russia and the experiences of Soviet citizens living in the communist experiement.  How did 1917 happen?  What type of state did the Communist Party create?  How did Soviet citizens experience the 75 years of communism?  What happened in Russia after 1991?  These are some of the questions this course will seek answers for.

AMS/HST 397  American Environmental History - TR 11:40-1:00
Dr. Peggy Shaffer
History Major:  United States

Introduction to human-natural environment relationships in English North America and the United States, ca. 1600 to present.  Chronological and regional approach with emphasis upon political economy and the American conservationist/ environmentalist movement.

HST 400I  Senior Capstone: History of Empire in the Ancient and Pre-Modern World - MW 1:15-2:35
Dr. Matthew Gordon
History Major:  Senior Capstone

HST 400K  Senior Capstone: History of Miami University - MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Steven Conn
History Major:  Senior Capstone

In this course students will work on a joint research/writing project titled "The History of Miami University in 50 Objects."  Students will learn about the history of the university, explore the wide variety of different collections we have on campus - from art, to natural history, to archival materials - and then do a deep dive into the history of these objects as a way of telling the story of Miami's history.

HST 428  History through Literature - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Stephen Norris

Explores the relationship between historical narratives and fictional ones.  Students will read works of historical fiction along with historical theories in order to think more deeply about narrative and how fiction can offer profound historical interpretations.  The reading for Spring 2019 will focus on Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace.

AMS/HST 433  Oral Tradition: History and Practice - TR 2:50-4:10
Dr. Nishani Frazier
History Major:  United States

Traces the use of oral tradition in historical writing and introduces theory and practice of oral history as a methodology basic to historical research.  This course will be an interactive research seminar that will explore how people remember and interpret the historical events of their lives, their community, and the world around them within the context of political, cultural, racial, and gender identity.  Students will explore various topics, including:  What is memory, how do we remember, the validity of memories, transmission of memories between generations, the impact of gender and race in the transition of memory, the oral tradition transformed into personal narrative, and how more atypical oral traditions can serve to illuminate our understanding of history.  These topics serve as a guide for understanding why oral history continues to be seen as a questionable source, even while providing unique and useful insight into the events of history.  This course will also investigate the notion of oral history, the contributions of oral historians, and the nuts and bolts guidelines of how to conduct an oral history interview for a paper and/or project.

HST 450J  The Horse in Human History - MW 4:25-5:45
Dr. Daniel Prior

Horses appear throughout history as special helpers and counterparts of human beings in labor, war, and sport.  The image of the horse pervades many cultures, including our own - so that examining history from the perspective of human-horse relations is an endeavor that presents a host of appealing topics, but also challenging and even frustrating puzzles for the methodical historian.  Early in the semester we will read and discuss an introductory set of books and articles dealing with the early domestication and use of the horse and other animals, the historiography of animal relations, questions of world history examined with special reference to the horse, and selected topical cases from different eras and regions, to suggest the breadth of possibilities for research.  The second part of the course will focus on completing an original piece of independent research on a topic of your own choosing, using the class as a forum and workshop.