Spring Semester

SPRING SEMESTER 2017-18

HST 111-A  Survey of American History I – MW 10:05-11:25
Dr. Adrienne Chudzinski

HST 111-B Survey of American History I - MW 8:30-9:50
Dr. Adrienne Chudzinski

HST 112 Survey of American History II - MW 11:40-12:35
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Steven Conn

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.

Together, HST 111 and 112 provide students with a basic introduction to the major issues and questions in the history of the geographical region covered by the present-day United States of America.  Specifically, HST 111 deals with the American past between 1492, the year in which Spain "discovered" the Western Hemisphere, and the Era of Reconstruction (1865-1877).  HST 112 covers the past century, during which time the United States industrialized and developed into a world power.  While each course will ask you to learn about specific people, places and events, the major concern will be to ask you to think about why we are what we are today.  While we will focus on the central events of our collective past--in HST 111 the founding of the colonies, the establishment of black slavery, the American Revolution, the Civil War and Reconstruction; in HST 112 immigration, industrialization, urban growth, 20th century reform, and the impact of World Wars I and II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War--we will do so from the perspectives of recent scholarship by historians concerned with questions of gender, race, environmentalism, class and region.  Although the basic structure of this course will be traditional, the content will be more unusual.  HST 111 and 112 may be taken singly, in sequence or out of sequence.

HST 197  World History to 1500 – WF 8:30-9:50
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Daniel Prior

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major: Geographical Diversity; pre-1500 (for students entering Miami 2011-12 through 2014-15)

HST 198-A  World History since 1500 - TR 10:05-11:00
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. William Brown

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major:  Geographical Diversity (for students entering Miami 2011-12 through 2014-15)

Emphasizes the growing interrelatedness of the regions of the world since the time of the European voyages of exploration and accelerating since the industrial and ideological revolutions of the late eighteenth century.

HST 206  Historical Inquiry - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Charlotte Goldy

Introduction to essential skills in investigating and interpreting the past.  Course stresses active participation, writing, and intensive reading of primary documents and secondary literature.  Required of History Majors.

HST/LAS 217  Modern Latin American History - MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Lance Ingwersen
History Major:  Latin America

Introduction to the major themes shaping Latin American history since independence, including US foreign policy; economic development; the discourses of race, ethnicity, class, and gender; cultural elements that either unite or distinguish Latin American countries.

HST 222  U.S. Foreign Relations since 1898 - TR 10:05-11:25
Dr. Amanda McVety
History Major:  United States
Thematic Sequence (NSC 2): War--An Extension of Politics

A history of U.S. foreign relations since 1898.  Emphasis is placed upon identifying, analyzing, and correcting historical myths about selected major events, issues, and themes that have influenced our memory of the past and our lives in the present and future.

BWS/HST 225  The Making of Modern Africa - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah
History Major:  Africa
Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.

This course is a survey of the transformation of Africa, south of the Sahara, from the time of the scramble for, and partition of, the continent among European powers in the second half of the 19th century, to the present.  Emphasis will be on economic, social, cultural, political, and intellectual features of this period.  This will be done through the reading of monographs, articles, and literary works (novels, plays, poems, etc.) on the political economy of colonialism, African experiences with colonialism, the rise and triumph of nationalism, African womanhood, popular culture and the experiences of change, and the rise and nature of post-colonial economic and political crises in the region.

HST/ATH/RUS 254  Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Zara Torlone (Classics Department)
History Major:  Europe

This course examines the major developments that have shaped Russian and Eurasian culture, society and politics over the last millennium.  The course incorporates perspectives from the social sciences, humanities and the fine arts.

HST/LAS 260  Latin America in the United States
Section B - MW 10:05-11:25
Section C - MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Joanna Camacho Escobar (Latin American Studies)
Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Global Perspectives Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major:  United States

Interdisciplinary examination of historical, social, economic, and cultural forces that have shaped the experience of peoples of Latin, Hispanic, Latino/a background in the United States.

HST 270D  The Mongols and Their World - WF 11:40-1:00
Dr. Daniel Prior
History Major:  Asia; Pre-Modern, pre-1500

This course introduces the history of the Mongol Conquests and the Mongol Empire, from the rapid rise of Mongol power under Chinggis Khan in the 12th and 13th centuries to the long-lasting, widespread effects of Mongol rule that persisted for centuries after the dissolution of their huge empire.  We will analyze both primary and secondary sources, including perspectives of contemporary observers from Western Europe, the Near East, Central Asia, China, and Russia.  An important question we will explore is the extent to which the development of the modern world has been conditioned by processes of Eurasian integration dating from the Mongol era.

HST 270M  Genocides in the 20th Century - MW 1:15-2:35
Dr. Erik Jensen
History Major:  Geographical Diversity.  See Department Advisor for DARS notation.

This course focuses on four of the largest instances of organized mass murder in modern times - the Armenian genocide, the Holocaust, the Killing Fields of Pol Pot's Cambodia, and the Rwandan genocide in 1994.  It explores both the motivations behind these atrocities and the ways in which societies have sought to commemorate them, to make "sense" of them, and to prevent them from occurring again.

HST 296  World History since 1945 - MW 11:40-12:35
Weekly discussion sections scheduled at various times.
Dr. Erik Jensen

HST 296-B  World History since 1945 - MW 4:25-5:45
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah

Miami Plan Humanities Foundation IIB; Miami Plan Global Course Foundation IIIB; Cultures Requirement; Historical Perspectives Requirement.
History Major:  Geographical Diversity

From the outcome and effects of World War II to the new globalization.  The Cold War, decolonization and its lingering effects, America's numerous foreign wars, the end of the Soviet Union and its bloc, issues of food production, and climate change are examples of topics to be covered.

AMS/HST 304  History, Memory, Tradition - MW 1:15-2:35
Dr. Helen Sheumaker
History Major:  United States

It is not uncommon for history, memory, and tradition to be defined in simplistic terms.  People are often comforted by the sense of certainty they convey.  The past becomes a place of refuge.  This course takes a different view.  Drawing upon a broad range of disciplinary perspectives, it examines the constructed and contested nature of all three concepts.  We will critique many sites of memory--from popular film to museums, historical sites, and television.  Readings range from theoretical arguments about memory and history to case studies.  We will examine the American and the global practices of History and Memory, from Miami University's campus to global narratives of slavery to American mythologies of leaders; assignments range from analyzing episodes of Drunk History and films to student-driven topics for final papers.

HST 313  History of England to 1688 - TR 10:05-11:25
Dr. Charlotte Goldy
History Major:  Europe; Pre-Modern, pre-1500

Life of the English people from the beginning of the Middle Ages to 1688.  This semester in Oxford only, we will focus on the Middle Ages into the Tudor period (1603) looking at the development of the modern national government, the beginnings of Common Law, the merging of peoples and cultures that became "England."  Your grade will be based on out-of-class essays and reading responses.

HST 350C  United States in the 1970s - MW 10:05-11:25
Dr. Nishani Frazier
History Major:  United States

This course will concentrate on American social, cultural, and political history of the 1970s.  The course will take a thematic approach and will address such issues as popular politics, the Vietnam War, city decline, race relations, the people's power movements, feminism, environmental and gay revolutions, pornography revolt, and conservative rise.

HST 350G  American Religions: Church and State in the U.S. - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Steven Conn
History Major:  United States.  See Department Advisor for DARS notation.

HST 359  Junior Honors Colloquium - TR 2:50-4:10
Dr. William Brown

Introduction to some of the issues involved in the conceptualization and writing of a major history project.  Designed for students planning to write an Honors thesis in History in the senior year.  Enrollment is by invitation only; contact the instructor for more information.

HST 360.2  Violence in Africa - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Osaak Olumwullah
History Major:  Africa

HST 360E  Middle East in Late Antiquity - TR 11:40-1:00
Dr. Matthew Gordon

HST/BWS 386  Race in U.S. Society - MW 11:40-1:00
Dr. Tammy Brown
History Major:  United States

Examines the historical contexts within which major transformations in racial practices and policies have taken place and analyzes racialized customs and behaviors in the United States across time and place.

AMS/HST 397  American Environmental History - TR 2:50-4:10
Dr. Peggy Shaffer
History Major:  United States

Introduction to human-natural environment relationships in English North America and the United States, ca. 1600 to present.  Chronological and regional approach with emphasis upon political economy and the American conservationist/ environmentalist movement.

HST 400.5  Senior Capstone:  Russian Revolution - TR 11:40-1:00
Dr. Stephen Norris
History Major:  Senior Capstone

In this capstone, students will be able to choose a research topic related to the Russian revolutions of 1917, conduct research on that topic, and write a substantial work of history about it.  We will make use of the extensive Andre de Saint-Rat Collection in the Walter Havighurst Special Collections as well as other available primary sources.

HST 400S  Senior Capstone:  Violence in American History - MW 4:25-5:45
Dr. Adrienne Chudzinski
History Major:  Senior Capstone

The history of the United States is replete with moments in which Americans engaged in or were subject to violence.  In this course, students will think about how factors related to race, gender, class, religion, and nationalism contribute to Americans' perceptions and memories of violent episodes in the nation's history.  Cultural representations of the past like film, fiction, music, memorials, and museums will serve as key sources in this course and demonstrate to students how Americans remember, forget, celebrate, or deny specific events.  Finally, this class will encourage students to pay close attention to sources that threaten or contradict dominant narratives and offer alternate or more complete versions of the roles that violence and conflict played in the nation's past.

HST 410D  International Organizations after WWII - TR 1:15-2:35
Dr. Amanda McVety
History Major:  United States.  See Department Advisor for DARS notation.

This class will focus on the creation of the United Nations System during and immediately after World War II and its subsequent role in international relations.

AMS/HST 433  Oral Tradition: History and Practice - MW 4:25-5:45
Dr. Nishani Frazier
History Major:  United States

Traces the use of oral tradition in historical writing and introduces theory and practice of oral history as a methodology basic to historical research.  This course will be an interactive research seminar that will explore how people remember and interpret the historical events of their lives, their community, and the world around them within the context of political, cultural, racial, and gender identity.  Students will explore various topics, including:  What is memory, how do we remember, the validity of memories, transmission of memories between generations, the impact of gender and race in the transition of memory, the oral tradition transformed into personal narrative, and how more atypical oral traditions can serve to illuminate our understanding of history.  These topics serve as a guide for understanding why oral history continues to be seen as a questionable source, even while providing unique and useful insight into the events of history.  This course will also investigate the notion of oral history, the contributions of oral historians, and the nuts and bolts guidelines of how to conduct an oral history interview for a paper and/or project.

HST 470A  Theater in the Americas - MW 2:50-4:10
Dr. Lance Ingwersen