Media and Culture

A Bachelor of Arts degree in Media and Culture will expose you to every area of the media field.

If you’re looking to become the next Steven Spielberg, our terrific production courses, equipment and facilities will get you started. If you’re more interested in the business side of the media field, you can study how media organizations deal with the financial, audience and staffing elements of their business. And if you want to know more about how the media impact our lives, our program will help you understand media processes and institutions, as well as media effects on global culture and society.

In your Oxford classes, you might dissect films for their message about sexuality or gender, produce your own film, or produce or anchor a television newscast.

And you’ll do all this in a strong liberal arts context. Our requirement that Media and Culture students have a second major is based in the philosophy that college graduates should be well-rounded and steeped in history, science, art and culture, language and philosophy.

Ultimately all of our students put theoretical knowledge into practice through our classes in all aspects of the media. Our graduates have gone on to successful careers in television and film production, broadcast management, social media communication, broadcast news, public relations, and political messaging and analysis, among others.

F.A.Q.

What are the features of the Media and Culture major?

Interdisciplinary approach

The program's interdepartmental framework brings together insights and applications from various disciplines while providing access to resources across several departments.

Double major

The program offers time to pursue interests in other areas by requiring a second major typically in a non-media-related field. Interactive Media Studies is allowed as a second major.

Small classes

Writing and production classes are limited to 18 students in order to facilitate an effective learning environment.

Practical experience

Students have obtained internships in television and film production, broadcast management, social media communication, broadcast news, public relations, and political messaging and analysis, among others. Miami’s Inside Hollywood and Inside Washington programs also provide first-hand experience in the entertainment industry and political media. There are also a number of Miami student organizations such as Miami Television News that provide practical experience.

What are the special admission requirements, if any?

None.

What courses would I take?

During your first year, you will take two introductory courses that will give you a broad overview of the media world. You will then take four core classes that will equip you with necessary skills spanning a variety of areas, including video production, media history, and writing for media. The following years, you will focus on completing your five electives that you will choose from 15 media courses. You will also choose two signature experiences during your final semesters, such as Inside Hollywood, Inside Washington, or a Senior Project in Communication.

What can I do with this major?

Our graduates have had successful careers in a wide range of areas including film and television production; media sales and management; media promotion; public relations; corporate communications; law; public policy and broadcast journalism.

Who can I contact for more information?

Howard Kleiman, Professor, Area Coordinator, Assistant Department Chair
150 Williams Hall
Oxford, OH 45056
513-529-3545
kleimah@MiamiOH.edu

Curriculum

Major in Media and Culture

The Media and Culture major requires a double major. Any major is acceptable as long as it's outside of the Department of Media, Journalism and Film (a business major will require a student to be accepted into the Farmer School of Business. This requires a 3.5 cumulative GPA in Miami Plan courses and the completion of calculus and microeconomics).

Students who entered Miami prior to the fall of 2015 may use two minors in place of the second major. The minors must also be taken outside of the Department of Media, Journalism and Film.

Course Descriptions

MAC 143 - Introduction to Media (3 credit hours). Designed to be the first class for Media & Culture majors, this course also fulfills the General Miami Plan social science requirement. Students learn to think about the media in new ways through an introduction to the history of various media technologies and industries, and by applying various theories to the media-saturated culture in which students live. Course readings and short writing assignments encourage students to reflect on their roles as media consumers, media producers and media-age citizens.

MAC 146 - Media Aesthetics (3). An introduction to media aesthetics in which students become aware of the artistic choices necessary for good television production. They are introduced to design elements and techniques used in TV production, and they discuss and participate in creative visual thinking. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC/JRN F104 - LGBTQ People and the Press (3). Examines the complex relationship between the news media and the gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer community. The course focuses on censorship, coverage, representation, fairness and employment. Publications by and for the LGBTQ community - and their influence and economic viability - are explored, as well as the role of news media in key events and issues, such as the McCarthy hearings, Stonewall uprising, assassination of Harvey Milk, HIV/AIDS, Don’t Ask Don’t Tell and marriage equality.

MAC 206 – Diversity and Culture in American Film (3). Study and analysis of the representation of diversity and culture as portrayed in American motion pictures. The goal is critical analysis of both the narrative and visual elements found in motion pictures, and the impact/effect these elements have on viewers in terms of diversity and culture in America. Film screenings provide the backdrop for class discussions, while serving as the source and basis for written analysis.

MAC 209 – Advertising and Consumer Culture (3). Introduces students to the historical development and socio-economic functions of mass mediated advertising while assessing its impact on culture. The course investigates the ways in which mass mediated advertising conveys messages that shape attitudes, values and behaviors. The ethical issues of contemporary advertising are addressed throughout the course.

MAC 211 - Introduction to Electronic Media Production (4). Students become acquainted with the fundamentals and techniques of sound production, and with the elements involved in the design and production of video messages. Prerequisite: major status and MAC 146.

MAC 212 – Media, Representation, and Society (3). A survey of the place of electronic media in society. The topics covered in the course will include media and culture; media economics, industries, and institutions; the politics of media content; media and social representation. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC 213 - Writing for the Electronic Media: Scriptwriting (3). Basic course in writing for radio and television, with emphasis on documentary, dramatic, and specialized formats for film and video. Prerequisite: major status and MAC 146; cross-listed with ENG 257.

MAC 215 - Electronic Media History (3). A survey course that takes students from the early experiments in electromagnetism, to examining the development and impact of electronic media in the United States and internationally today. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

COM 259 – Introduction to Strategic Communication & Public Relations (3). Introduces public relations as a profession of applied communication. Analyzes public relations in its place, purpose, processes, tools and the many publics to which it applies.

MAC 267 – Practicum in Electronic Media Production II (3). Exposes majors to the video and television production process. Students participate in production work and are involved in pre- and post- production sessions. Offered credit/no-credit only. Prerequisite: Major status, MAC 146, and MAC 211.

MAC 282—Sexualities and Film (3). An exploration of film representations of diverse sexualities (e.g. gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered) from the silent era to the present. Cross-listed with FST 282.

MAC 301— Journalism Law and Ethics (3). Focuses on statutory and common law limitations on freedom of the press in America, and the legislative and judicial rationales for them. Considers ethical theories and their applications to situations that journalists commonly encounter. Prerequisite: major status. Cross-listed with JRN 301.

MAC 311 – Digital Film Production (3). Experience in the production and direction of television formats with emphasis on applied media aesthetics. Field production theories and exercises. Prerequisite: Major status, MAC 146, and MAC 211.

MAC 312 - TV Studio Production (3). Experience in the production and direction of television formats with emphasis on applied media aesthetics. Studio production theories and exercises. Prerequisite: Major status, MAC 146, and MAC 211.

MAC 314 - Digital Video Reporting (3). Advanced-level coursework emphasizing digital video writing, reporting and editing. Students will learn to produce video news stories across broadcast television and mobile platforms. Prerequisite: MAC 211 and JRN 202, major status, or permission of instructor.

MAC 325 – Social Media Cultures (3). Research and study of the relationship between social human interaction and media. Students consider both analog and digital forms of social media, comparing the two. They then apply theories from cultural studies, mass communication, and communication studies to both online and offline social media, yielding an understanding of the interaction between social practices and contemporary media cultures.

MAC 340 – Internship (1-16). Applied experience in communication for qualified students meeting departmental and area requirements. Find out about the application process and opportunities by clicking here.

MAC 343 – Advanced Audio Production (3). Introduces students to theory, practice and criticism in advanced electronic media production, focusing on music recording, narrative and journalism. Includes practical work in studio methods, microphone techniques and control room operations. Students learn sound aesthetics and values while getting an overview of traditional sound production equipment and software.

MAC 353 - Audience Studies (3). Introduction to audience analysis, including review of services provided by media research organizations and procedures of applied survey research for the media. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC 355 - Media Technology & Culture (3). Focuses on the relationships among technology, society, and communications (the mass media and information systems), exploring the key historical, cultural, and political/economic issues raised by new communication technologies. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC 414 - Senior Project in Communication (4). In-depth personal investigation of a specific aspect of communication. This may be performing original research, comprehensive review of extant literature, internship, and/or operating as a teaching or research assistant in communication. Students work closely with a faculty adviser/mentor and meet with other students to discuss progress, problems and issues, and to integrate ideas. Students write about their investigation results and give an oral presentation in a public forum. Prerequisite: senior standing, appropriate course work in communication (at least nine hours, to include a Thematic Sequence in the area) and/or other relevant areas of study, and permission of the faculty adviser/mentor.

MAC 415 - Practicum in Television News (3). Students report, write and produce a regularly scheduled television newscast aired on Oxford's cable television system. Students participate in and evaluate all aspects of television news gathering and reporting process. Prerequisite: major status, MAC 146, MAC 211 or JRN 202, and either MAC 314 or applied journalism experience. Crosslisted with JRN 415.

MAC 421 - Advanced Workshop in Feature Film Screenwriting (3). Analysis of examples of contemporary screenplays, with emphasis on the craft of writing screenplays. Class discussion and sharing of student-written screenplays. Prerequisites: Two of the following: MAC 213, ENG 320, ENG 420. Course is crosslisted with ENG 422.

MAC 426 – Inside Washington Summer Program (8 credit hours). Intensive study of the contemporary Washington, D.C., community–government institutions, public officials, journalists, consultants, staff, and interest groups through reading, lecture, on-site observations, expert presentations, discussion, research, writing and internships. Program conducted in Washington. Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor, crosslisted with JRN426/526 and POL426/526.

MAC 427 – Inside Washington Semester Experience (4 credit hours). Intensive study of the contemporary Washington, D.C., community–government institutions, public officials, journalists, consultants, staff, and interest groups through reading, lecture, on-site observations, expert presentations, discussion, research, writing and internships. Program conducted in Washington. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Concurrent course(s): MAC/JRN/POL 453, MAC/JRN/POL 377 or 477, CON/JRN/POL 340.

MAC 443 – Media Economics (3). Intensive study of the management process as applied to mass media industries Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC 445 - Seminar in Electronic Media Policy and Regulation (3). Advanced study of selected bodies of federal, state and local law, and their effects upon mass media. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC 446 – Media Globalization (3). Survey of international communication systems, with emphasis on comparative analysis based on current typologies, and economic, social, political, and regulatory variables. Prerequisites: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC 447 – Seminar in Media Criticism (3). Examination of the performance of mass media, especially television, in current social settings. Topics include news and entertainment programming and the relationship between the media industry and its products. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor.

MAC 450 - Topics in Media & Film Studies (3). Study or research of issues and problems associated with media and culture under the guidance of a faculty member of the Media & Culture Program. Prerequisite: senior standing or written approval of the instructor.

MAC 454 – The Washington Community (3). Focuses on the Washington, D.C., as a complex political-social system that is both the seat of American democracy and a metropolis plagued with typical urban problems. Students complement their study of the formal political and media systems in the main Inside Washington course, MAC 426 or 427, by focusing on the development and behavior of constituent communities within the city of Washington.

MAC 461 - Gender, Sexuality & Media (3). Examines how media help to shape notions of gender in society, how gender ideologies influence mass media perspectives and practices, and how mediated representations may reinforce or challenge social hierarchies based indifference of gender, race, ethnicity, class and sexual orientation. Prerequisite: major status or permission of instructor. Cross-listed with WMS 461.

Faculty