Miami Takes Music Hall

Music Hall in Cincinnati

"Stunning. Lyrical and hauntingly beautiful."—Fanfare magazine

What do you get when you combine a ground-breaking musical work, a world-class piano player, and the Miami Symphony Orchestra? Pure magic.

Miami University music professor Glen Roger Davis’ cutting-edge Concerto in F makes its U.S. premier at Miami. Accompanied by University of Cincinnati CCM's Piano Department chair Michael Chertock on piano and Ricardo Averbach as conductor, the performance will bring Davis' beautiful and touching work to life. It's a delightfully riveting, yet intense work that might well become a prototype of symphonic music for the new millennium.

Concerto in F sold out the first edition of its recording for the label Vienna Modern Masters. The piece is a unique blend of international patterns—Latino, Caribbean, Indian Continent, African, Celtic Folk Music and American Popular music—fused with traditional elements of symphonic music, especially those at the crest of symphonic idiomatic evolution.

Miami Takes Music Hall

Miami Symphony Orchestra
Ricardo Averbach, conductor

Featuring Glen Roger Davis' Piano Concerto in F

Michael Chertock, piano

7:30 p.m., Monday, March 4

Cincinnati Music Hall
1241 Elm St, Cincinnati, OH 45202

Sponsors

Department of Music

Spotlight on Glen Roger Davis

Roger DavisGlen Roger Davis’ Piano Concerto in F is a coherent collage of styles that reflects the multidimensional facets of our culture, taking influences from Beethoven, Ligetti, Ives, Crumb, Messiaen, Gershwin, Jimmy Hendrix and the Beatles, among many others. In this sense, it can be considered the first Rock Piano Concerto in History. It defines a new aesthetic in Western Art Music, allowing for the inclusion, hybridization and juxtaposition multiple styles into a coherent whole. Concerto in F is a unique blend of international patterns—Latino, Caribbean, Indian Continent, African, Celtic Folk Music and American Popular music—fused with traditional elements of symphonic music, especially those at the crest of symphonic idiomatic evolution.

Written in the same key as another masterpiece of American music—Gershwin’s Concerto in F—Glen Roger Davis' composition has strong roots in the past. It brings to the audience all of the aggressive energy that is associated with Twentieth Century music moving forward, yet it abounds with optimism, joy and traditional harmonies. This delightfully riveting, yet intense work might well become a prototype of symphonic music for the new millennium.

After the sold out first edition of its recording for the label Vienna Modern Masters, Davis' Piano Concerto in F will receive its American premiere on March 4, 2018 in Music Hall in Cincinnati.

A descendent of Native American Indians combined with a Welsh heritage, Glen Roger Davis started as a self-taught musician, playing in rock bands. During his youth, he traveled and performed extensively with the group The Doors and Jim Morrison, who influenced his aesthetics.

Dr. Davis was a victim of an almost unbearable and abusive childhood that lead to a mental illness—depersonalization disorder—which has followed him throughout his life. Trying to hide this condition from others, his unique illness has been a known case study in scientific journals, which determined that his mind works in a synesthetic way. This explains, for example, the large-scale predictability of the musical form in this concerto as being a musical expression of the Chaos Theory from Quantum Mechanics, which the composer purposely sought to integrate in his compositional method.