Student Handbooks

General Handbook

Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Mission, Program Objectives, and Program Learning Outcomes

The mission of the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Department is:

Our mission is to teach and prepare liberally educated, articulate, and skilled engineers for leadership and professional careers and for advanced study. The industries we serve include the chemical, pulp and paper, bioengineering, and environmental engineering industries. A central objective of our program is to advance the fields of chemical and bioengineering through innovations in teaching and research, thus enhancing student knowledge through interactive instruction, global engagement, and experiential learning. The program will serve as a resource to inform society about innovations related to the production and uses of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, fuels, forest products, biomedical products, and biomaterials.

The department accomplishes the mission through achievement of four program objectives. Each of these objectives has a set of student-focused learning outcomes associated with it.

Program Educational Objectives (Bioengineering)

Objective 1. The graduate will have and apply the technical knowledge, skills and expertise required of a process engineer to achieve practical solutions to problems in the chemical industry or for a company allied to the chemical industry. The graduate will serve the needs of biochemical, environmental and paper industries.

Objective 2. The graduate will have the organizational, leadership, and general communication skills needed by professionals at the entry-level and beyond.

Objective 3. The graduate will have the key personal attributes desirable in an engineer and use these attributes to learn and develop.

Objective 4. The graduate will have life-long learning skills, which will allow successful adaptation to the changing environment and evolving technologies throughout their professional career.

Objective 5. The major will have sound grounding in engineering, sciences and liberal education, which will facilitate successful pursuit of graduate studies in Engineering, or other professional degrees, such as Business, Law and Medicine.

Student Outcomes:

  • Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  • Ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • Ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • Ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • Ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context.
  • Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • Knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Program Educational Objectives (Chemical Engineering)

Objective 1. The graduate will have and apply the technical knowledge, skills and expertise required of a process engineer to achieve practical solutions to problems in the chemical industry or for a company allied to the chemical industry. The graduate will serve the needs of biochemical, environmental and paper industries.

Objective 2. The graduate will have the organizational, leadership, and general communication skills needed by professionals at the entry-level and beyond.

Objective 3. The graduate will have the key personal attributes desirable in an engineer and use these attributes to learn and develop.

Objective 4. The graduate will have life-long learning skills, which will allow successful adaptation to the changing environment and evolving technologies throughout their professional career.

Objective 5. The major will have sound grounding in engineering, sciences, and liberal education, which will facilitate successful pursuit of graduate studies in Engineering or other professional degrees, such as Business, Law and Medicine.

Student Outcomes (Chemical Engineering)

  • Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  • Ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • Ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • Ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • Ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context.
  • Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • Knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Program Educational Objectives (Engineering Management: Paper Science Program)

Objective 1. Enable a student to gain the technical knowledge, skills and talents required to achieve practical solutions to challenges in paper industry or for a company allied to the paper industry.

Objective 2. Enable a student to develop the organizational, leadership, and general communication skills needed by professionals at the entry-level and beyond.

Objective 3. Promote the development of key personal attributes desirable in an engineering graduate.

Student Outcomes (Engineering Management: Paper Science)

  • Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  • Ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • Ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • Ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • Ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context.
  • Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • Knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Program Educational Objectives (Engineering Management: Environmental Engineering Program)

Objective 1. Enable a student to gain the technical knowledge, skills, and talents required of an environmental engineer to achieve practical and economical solutions to environmental challenges pertaining to industry and society.

Objective 2. Enable a student to develop the organizational, leadership, and general communication skills needed by professionals at the entry-level and beyond.

Objective 3. Promote the development of key personal attributes desirable in an engineering graduate.

Student Outcomes (Engineering Management: Environmental Engineering)

  • Ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science and engineering.
  • Ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data.
  • Ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  • Ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  • Ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  • Understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  • Ability to communicate effectively.
  • The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context.
  • Recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning.
  • Knowledge of contemporary issues.
  • Ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.

Overview of ABET Accreditation

www.abet.org/accreditation/

Accreditation benefits the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering department and its students in the following ways:

  • Provides a smooth path to the professional engineering license for graduates of the program.
  • Provides better placement opportunities for graduates.
  • Provides an external viewpoint for program assessment and improvement
  • Motivates the faculty to focus on quality improvement and the acquisition of resources needed to achieve excellence
  • Clearly identifies the program of study as an engineering program.

Student responsibilities related to ABET accreditation
Students of the Department have several important responsibilities related to ABET accreditation. First, students prepare course notebooks for every course in their program during a year prior to an accreditation visit. These notebooks are reviewed by the ABET Visiting Team and constitute a very important part of the department's documentation for the visit.

Second, students participate actively in the assessment feedback endeavors of the Department by completing course evaluations, participating on the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Student Advisory Council, and informing the department Chair promptly about areas that need improvement.

Third, every student is expected to become closely familiar with the ABET design process and how it relates to the activities of a process engineer.

Fourth, students meet with ABET Reviewers during the on-site accreditation visit to discuss various aspects of the program and their experiences in the program.

Licensure for Engineers

We recommend that every student make an honest attempt to become licensed as a professional engineer (P.E.). Licensure is not only a mark of a professional; it also demonstrates that you have accomplished a recognized standard. In many instances especially pertaining to protection of public health, safety and welfare, engineers are required to obtain P.E. license. Each state has slightly varying criteria for licensure. Please refer to the National Council of Examiners for Engineering and Surveying for more information, (http://ncees.org/licensure/). One of the first exams in obtaining licensure is the Fundamentals of Engineering. All students the Department are strongly encouraged to take this exam and make a “good faith” attempt to pass the exam. Once you pass the exam, you are classified as an intern, also known as an Engineering-in- Training (E.I.T.).

Academic Advising

The primary goal of the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Department is to insure that all Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering students progress through the academic program in its intended course sequence while meeting all grade prerequisite requirements. The departmental academic advising system is the principal mechanism through which this goal is achieved. Successful academic advising is the result of cooperative efforts from both students and faculty. The following information is intended to assist students as they participate in this important activity.

The following lists the most important topics that should be covered in advising sessions. Note that first year students have different needs than students who are in their second year and beyond. Of the many topics listed in the table, advanced registration will probably be the most important activity undertaken. It occurs every semester and represents the central function, while the other topics in the table have more supporting roles. Because of this, registration information occupies a substantial portion of this manual.

You must meet with your academic advisor every semester prior to advance registration in order to discuss the courses your plan to take the next semester.

Topics that should be addressed in academic advising sessions

First year students:

  • Study habit advising
  • Curriculum structure and prerequisite flow reinforcement
  • "C or better" grade rules enforcement; retaking mathematics and chemistry courses
  • Credit/no credit rules
  • Advanced registration decisions
  • DARS* form interpretation
  • Global Miami Plan and the CPB curriculum
  • Course drop deadline dates
  • Methodology for prioritizing course selections in the BANNERWEB system
  • Need to obtain advisor's signature on a completed registration advising form at the conclusion of every academic advising session.

Second year students and beyond:

  • "C or better" grade rules enforcement advising
  • Course prerequisite enforcement advising
  • Credit/no credit rules
  • Advanced registration decisions
  • Global Miami Plan and the CPB curriculum
  • Course substitution administration**
  • Academic petition preparation
  • Need to obtain advisor's signature on a completed registration advising form at the conclusion of every academic advising session.

*DARS = Degree Audit Record System
**Students may petition course substitutions or the waiver of course requirements in special cases.

Roles and responsibilities of the Academic Advisor and the Student

Your academic advisor provides support and guidance to you in your academic decision- making as you go through your course of study. The advisor should be knowledgeable about all of the topics listed in the above table. Your advisor also will assist you in the preparation of petitions pertaining to academic matters, and must sign them before they can be submitted to the department Petition Committee.

You are responsible for scheduling advising meetings at least once each semester prior to advanced registration for the next semester in order to discuss your course schedule plans. You must prepare for these meetings by knowing which courses you need to take, when they are offered, which sections you wish to elect, and whether or not you meet the prerequisite requirements for each course. If you do not meet the prerequisite requirements, then you must be prepared to suggest alternative solutions to this problem, such as course substitutions, or waiving prerequisite requirements. If it becomes clear that a petition to the faculty will be required, then you are responsible for preparing as a good draft of the document as you can, and then bringing it to your advisor for final revision and submission. This all must take place during the semester prior to the semester in which you plan to take the course or courses in question.

What back-up information do I need to prepare for an advanced registration advising session?
When asked this question, experienced students indicated that the following key backup materials are needed when preparing for an advising session.

  • Recommended course sequences for the programs in Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering and Engineering Management (Paper and Environmental)
  • A table that indicates which semester, or semesters, a given course is offered.
  • The course flow chart that indicates prerequisite requirements in the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering programs.
  • A description of the alternate course sequences a coop student can follow without having scheduling problems
  • A copy of your latest DARS report.

You can review your DARS anytime; anywhere that Internet access is available. Login to review your DARS on BannerWeb your User ID is your University Login. As explained on the web page, the default PIN is your birth date in the format MMDDYY, unless you have previously changed it

Graduating Seniors: Please check your DARS to determine whether or not it contains any unmet degree requirements that will prevent you from graduating. This document is used to certify completion of degree requirements. Notify your academic advisor immediately if you have areas that are not completed. Print and bring a copy of your DARS with you to advising appointments.

Preparing for Summer and Advanced Registration: The DARS identifies courses and requirements that must be fulfilled for degree completion. This tool will help you plan your schedule for upcoming semesters. Print and bring a copy with you to appointments with your advisor.

The Thematic Sequence (MPT) requirement is met by completing three related courses (usually nine hours) in an approved Thematic Sequence outside the student's department of major.

The Capstone Course (MPC) requirement is met by completing three hours in an approved Capstone course during a student's senior year. There are two courses required by the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering department that are Global Miami Plan Capstone courses - CPB 471, and 472.

You must consult with your Departmental academic advisor prior to participating in the advanced registration process each semester — Students are required to meet with their faculty advisor prior to registration each semester and have their selected course plan reviewed. Prerequisites and grades will be checked to confirm you meet the requirements for the courses you plan to take. All petition and/or remedial action issues should be addressed at this time. Students failing to meet with their faculty advisor prior to advanced registration in a given semester will not be allowed to petition the faculty for exceptions to prerequisite and/or grade requirements during the ensuing semester.

Academic Regulations

Course Policies It is your responsibility to preserve all graded tests and homework until after the final course grade is awarded. Sections of tests/homework that have inadvertently, not been graded must be identified at the end of the class period in which the test/homework is handed back to the class. Any other grievance with the grading of test/homework has to be brought to the attention of the instructor by 5:00 pm of the second working day after the graded test/homework is handed back to the class.

Graduation Requirements A student must attain a minimum 2.0 GPA average for required Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering courses. A 2.0 GPA average is also required in all courses taken at Miami University. Every student enrolled in the academic programs offered by the Department is strongly encouraged to take the Fundamentals of Engineering Exam and make a “good faith” effort to pass the exam.

Credit/No-Credit Policy Courses in engineering, chemistry, physics, mathematics, statistics, systems analysis, and English listed as requirements for a degree may not be taken on a credit/ no-credit basis. All Global Miami Plan courses, maybe taken for credit/ no credit.

Transfer Credit Policy To obtain transfer credit for any CPB course, you must first receive written departmental approval before enrolling in that course at another college or university.

Dropping a Course Dropping a course is a formal administrative procedure; merely ceasing to attend class is not the same as dropping a course. Before dropping a course, a student should consult with his or her instructor and academic adviser. A student may drop a course during the first 20 percent of the course, in which case no grade or other designation will appear on the student’s official record (see the academic calendar).

Withdrawing From a Course Withdrawing from a course is a formal administrative procedure; merely ceasing to attend class is not the same as withdrawing from a course. Before withdrawing from a course, a student should consult with his or her instructor and academic adviser. A student may withdraw from a course after the first 20 percent of the course and, ordinarily, before the end of 60 percent of the course. A grade of W will appear on the student’s official record. A grade of W is not calculated in the student’s grade point average, and credit hours graded with W do not count in enrollment status. Refunds follow University policy, available via the Office of the Bursar website. Students should refer to the Academic Calendar on the Office of the Registrar website for specific academic deadline dates. Students are strongly encouraged to contact their lenders and insurance agents to determine continued eligibility for loan deferments and insurance coverage before taking an action that will change their enrollment status to less than full-time.

After the first 20 percent of a course through the end of the first 60 percent, a student may withdraw from a course with a signature of acknowledgement from the instructor.

  • After 60 percent of the course is complete, a student may no longer withdraw from a course, unless a petition is approved by the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers. The petition must include the signatures of the course instructor and the student’s academic or divisional adviser. The petition must also describe and document the extenuating circumstances (extraordinary circumstances usually beyond the student’s control) that form the grounds of the petition. If the petition for withdrawal is approved, the student will be withdrawn from the course with a grade of W. If the petition is not approved, the student will be expected to remain in the course (see Section 1.3.E). The withdrawal deadline is 5:00 p.m. on the last Friday of the term’s classes preceding exam week, or if a sprint or accelerated class, 5:00 p.m. on the last meeting date of that class.
  • Only in rare circumstances will a petition to withdraw from a course after 60 percent of the course is complete be approved for reasons of academic performance alone.
  • When possible, a student should continue to attend class until the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers has acted on his or her petition. Non-attendance does not void financial responsibility or a grade of F.

If a student is found guilty of academic dishonesty in a class and withdraws from the class, the student will receive the grade of F for the class, and a notation of academic dishonesty will be posted directly beneath the class on the academic record.

CPB Department Statement on Academic Conduct

It is expected that all members of the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Department (faculty, staff and students) will adhere to the highest ethical standards in all matters. The Department endorses the Code of Ethics for Engineers proposed by the National Society of professional engineers and strongly defends the rights and responsibilities that accompany academic freedom which are at the heart of the intellectual integrity of Miami University

It is expected that students will conduct themselves in an ethical fashion, for example, by only possessing and using materials authorized by the instructor during examinations, submitting assignments which are the student's original work (carefully referencing sources of information), protecting the integrity of assignments by adhering to prescribed procedures, and carefully utilizing the University's materials and equipment resources.

Any activity that tends to compromise the academic integrity of the Institution or subvert the educational process is defined as academic misconduct. Cheating and other forms of academic misconduct undermine the value of a Miami education for everyone, especially for the person who cheats.

The CPB Department regards adherence to ethical standards as a very serious issue and will follow all the procedures and penalties for academic misconduct (academic dishonesty) prescribed in Part V of Miami University Student Handbook.

Laboratory safety policies and requirements

It is critical that good safety practices become part of your normal operating mode in order to avoid injury and to develop the safety habits expected by industry. (See earlier statement about engineering ethics and its reference to safety.) To aid you in this endeavor, you will be given a copy of the Engineering Safety Policies and Requirements when you enroll in the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering program. This document provides a complete treatment of the safety guidelines and general procedures adopted by the Department

You must follow safe practices in all Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering laboratories at all times. This is particularly true in laboratories that contain equipment having dangerous, large-scale moving parts, such as the pilot paper machine laboratory; in laboratories where high pressure, high temperature vessels are employed, such as the pulping laboratory; and, in laboratories where dangerous chemicals are used.

Appropriate safely equipment, such as safely glasses, must be worn at all times in laboratories whenever experimental work is being done

Additional Information

Gaining Professional Experience in the Program

It is very important that you gain practical, professional experience during your career at Miami When you complete your educational experience and begin the process of obtaining a permanent job, you will find that interviewers expect students to have gained significant professional engineering experience during their career at Miami. This is accomplished primarily through coop assignments and summer internships. You will also obtain personal career advice from other sources, such as career opportunity discussions in Student AIChE, BMES, SWE, EWB, and TAPPI organizations, and conversations with practicing engineers (Foundation members. College of Engineering and Computing Advisory Council members, guest speakers, summer internship and co-op interviewers).

You will also receive professional development advice from your academic advisor. (Most Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering faculty members have significant industry experience.)

Cooperative Education

The Co-op program is designed to give the student actual working experience in the paper industry or an allied industry. The Program is valuable to both the company supplying the Co-op position and the student who participates. Companies obtain technical assistance to complete projects that regular technical personnel may not have had adequate time to fulfill. Students gain practical knowledge that complements the more formal university course work, as well as financial assistance for the work on the job.

Co-op participation is the student's free choice; nonetheless it is very strongly recommended. The student can elect to do an internship for about three months (generally in the summer) or a full-blown co-op consisting of the summer and one semester. Typically, we recommend that students at the minimum do a three-month long internship after their sophomore year. We also strongly encourage students to gain a full co-op experience in the summer and fall after completing their junior year course requirements. The curriculum is designed in such a way that students who elect to do an internship or co-op will not be of out of sequence in their class work.

Most positions will be of a technical nature, in either research laboratories or production facilities. Positions can be located in almost any state. Students assigned to positions far from Ohio may be assisted with living costs and the transportation expenses while traveling to and from Oxford.

Admission criteria are based on a successful academic performance at Miami University. Once admitted to the program, the co-op student is periodically evaluated and informed of specific areas where his or her performance can improve. This evaluation is done by both the faculty and industrial supervisor. Program students also carry out periodic evaluation of their co-op positions and the company's use of co-op students.

Students who have accepted a co-op assignment have the responsibility of registering for CPB 320, Professional Practice for each term they are away. This is to avoid course registration problems when they return to full-time student status. They also must keep the department informed of their assignments and change of address, phone, etc.

General procedures for obtaining a summer internship - Summer internships assignments are administered through the MU Career Services Office (CSO). The Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Department posts all communications from the CSO to students on departmental bulletin boards.

Student Professional Organizations

Student BMES, AIChE, EWB, SWE, and TAPPI A very important part of your professional and leadership development will occur through your participation in student professional organizations. There are three such groups in Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering: Student BMES (Biomedical Engineering Society), Student AIChE (American Institute of Chemical Engineers), EWB (Engineers Without Borders), SWE (Society of Women Engineers) and TAPPI (Technical Association of the Pulp and Paper Industry). As their names imply, these organizations are affiliated with national parent organizations comprised of practicing professionals and receive significant support from these organizations.

At Miami, these student organizations undertake joint programming during the year. Programs are held monthly where industrial speakers are invited to talk about a technical, management, or professional development topic that is relevant to students. The two groups also sponsor a number of social events during the year.

Paper Science and Engineering Foundation

Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering students receive very strong industrial support. One of the primary examples of this support is the scholarship program sponsored by the Paper Science and Engineering Foundation. The Paper Science and Engineering Foundation is a non-profit organization established specifically to provide industry support to students in the Chemical and Paper Engineering program. Its 22 members represent a broad range of interests in the paper industry, including manufacturers, suppliers, distributors, and converters. The purpose is to help provide a continuing supply of technically and managerially trained men and women, who are well- versed in Chemical and Paper Engineering, to meet the requirements of the industry's continually advancing technology.

Paper Science and Engineering Foundation Scholarships - Each year, the Foundation awards scholarships to Chemical and Paper Engineering students who meet specific grade point average and other criteria. Additional awards, including special assistance for out-of-state students, are also available to qualified students. The Paper Science and Engineering Foundation scholarship program has been an important part of the program for the past 50 years, and over $1.5 million has been awarded to students. Approximately one-half of all Chemical and Paper Engineering graduates have received scholarship support. Please contact Mrs. Crist, Business Coordinator, cristcl@Miamioh.edu, for further information about scholarships.

Other interactions between students and the Foundation - The Foundation holds it’s Annual Meeting in the spring of each year. During this event students have multiple opportunities to interact with company representatives. For example, all students are invited to the annual Scholarship Awards Banquet held during the meeting. Students also make project presentations to the Foundation as part of their senior capstone engineering design experience.


Lab Safety Handbook

Emergency Numbers:
Emergency (Medical, Fire, Police)
Building Maintenance
Campus Security
Chemcial, Paper, and Biomedical Engineering Dept. Office
Oxford Fire Department
Oxford Police Department
Hospital
Environmental Health & Safety Office
Poison Control


9-911
529-6111
529-2222
529-0760
523-6324
523-4321
523-2111
529-2829
1-800-222-1222












Student Safety Instruction

Instructional Laboratory

  • Each student will receive two copies of the "Laboratory Safety" and "Eye Safety and Medical Information" sheet (attached,. They must read the colored copy, sign it (indicating their planned compliance), and return it to the instructor. The instructor gives them to the Departmental Secretary who keeps them on file in the laboratory for the semester. The student keeps a copy as a reference in their notebook.

Student Employees

  • Each student employee must read and sign the "Laboratory Safety" sheet and the "Eye Safety and Medical Information" sheet before starting to work in the laboratory.
  • Student Employees are to know the location and operation of the laboratory safety equipment. (Fire Extinguishers, Safety Showers, Eyewash Fountains and Manufactures Safety Data Sheets)
  • Student employees are to know the location and use of chemical clean up materials. (Acid spill kit, Mercury spill kit, kitty litter)

Laboratory Safety Procedures

The following rules must be followed to reduce risk of accident and injury in the laboratory.

  • Know the location and operation of safety equipment. This includes safety showers, eyewash stations, fire extinguishers, sinks, hoods, phones, and exits.
  • Know what to do in case of an accident. Report all accidents and hazardous situations, no matter how minor, to your instructor
  • Eye protection must be worn at all times when entering laboratories, or laboratory areas, with a potential for physical or chemical hazards (these areas are posted accordingly). Such protection is required; by virtue of your presence in the laboratory, independent of the activities conducted therein.
  • Wear appropriate clothing. No bare feet, sandals, or open toed shoes are permitted in the department laboratories. Loose baggy clothing should be avoided. Long hair must be tied back. Wear aprons, lab coats, and gloves when appropriate.
  • NEVER bring food (or chewing gum) or beverages into the laboratory. Don't apply cosmetics. Do NOT smoke in the laboratory. Do not smell (unless instructed) or taste laboratory chemicals.
  • Handle Chemicals with Caution. Read labels carefully. Only take as much as you need. Leave bottles in their proper place. Clear up spills around balances immediately. Report major spills to the instructor (particularly broken thermometers).
  • Handle Equipment Properly. Do not use equipment until you have been instructed how to use it. This includes spectrometers, digesters, and other equipment
  • Assemble apparatus according to instructions. Do not attempt to insert glass tubing or thermometers into rubber stoppers until your instructor has shown you the proper procedure. Do not use chipped or broken glassware. Place broken glassware into the proper container. If in doubt, ask your instructor. When heating test tubes take care not to point the open end of the test tube toward anyone.
  • Never perform any unauthorized experiments or procedures. Do not take chemicals, supplies, or equipment out of the lab area.
  • Dispose of chemicals properly, as instructed in the laboratory manual. Ask your instructor for the location of waste disposal bottles. Ask your instructor if you are unsure about proper disposal.
  • Clean your lab bench, put away all equipment and reagents, and wash your hands at the end of each work session.

Eye Safety and Medical Information

EYE PROTECTION

Eye protection is required in all laboratories and where chemicals are stored and handled

CONTACT LENSES

The use of contact lenses in the laboratory or where chemicals are stored and/or handled is STRONGLY DISCOURAGED.

It has been argued that contact lenses offer protection from damage by particles and chemicals. Nothing could be more erroneous. An eye that has received a chemical splash should be irrigated with water until the material has been completely washed out. This usually takes about 15 minutes. If a contact lens is in the affected eye, the chemicals may be drawn under the lens by capillary action where it cannot be reached by water washing. The lens must be removed to permit effective washing. Under the traumatic conditions with pain and fear as impediments it may be impossible for the victim or anyone else to remove the lens.

MEDICAL INFORMATION

The Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Department faculty/staff should be aware of the following information concerning my medical/health status. Please let your lab instructor know of any medical/heath problems.

Faculty Responsiblities

Faculty

  • Know the laboratory facilities, with special emphasis on safety equipment. (This includes checking the experimental setups prior to lab.)
  • Instruct students in safety.
  • Model and enforce proper laboratory safety and equipment use.
  • Maintain an awareness of current safety requirements.
  • Design experiments that are safe, and employ minimum amounts of chemicals as well as generate minimum amounts of waste.
  • Prepare and update laboratory manuals.
  • Assist the Laboratory Coordinator in maintaining the chemical stockroom and laboratory equipment.

Graduate Student

  • With the assistance of the faculty responsible for the laboratory, maintain the chemical storage area in a clean and organized manner consistent with established procedures.
  • Keep a file of current Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS).
  • Keep an inventory of current chemicals. Order supplies and chemicals as needed.
  • Oversee and coordinate the preparation of chemicals and equipment for the teaching laboratories.
  • With the assistance of the faculty maintain the laboratory equipment.
  • Oversee student workers and their safety training. Enforce the use of personal protective equipment and laboratory safety
  • Maintain clean up kits for spills. (Mercury, Acid)
  • See that safety equipment is checked regularly and kept in good working order (hoods, showers, eyewash, fire extinguishers).
  • Coordinate chemical waste disposal.

Emergency Procedures

Any incident resulting in injury, property damage, or a fire must be reported promptly to the professor in charge, to Dept. of Public Safety (529-2222 or "00") and to the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Office (529-0760).

In Case of Injury

  • In case of injury, promptly render first aid, doing only the minimum necessary to prevent more serious injury to the patient.
  • If the injury appears serious, telephone (9911) and give the following details:
    • Identify yourself.
    • What has happened and where the patient is located.
      • building
      • room number
    • If a hazardous chemical is involved, give the name of the substance in writing to the paramedic for delivery to the emergency room supervisor. (1f you cannot stay on the line, call the switchboard and have them call 9911.)
  • For minor injuries, encourage the injured to see their doctor.
  • Report the incident promptly to Dept. of Public Safety (529-2222) and to the Chemical, Paper and Biomedical Engineering Dept. Office (529-0760), and also give a completed Incident Report Form to the Professor in charge of the Laboratory who will submit it to the chair where it will be kept on file.

In Case of Fire

  • If the fire is small and easily extinguished, use an appropriate response. Beaker size fires can often be smothered or allowed to burn out. When necessary use an extinguisher. Notify the Laboratory Coordinator so that the extinguisher can be recharged.
  • Upon learning of a fire (big or difficult to extinguish) immediately pull the fire alarm - if it is not already sounding. Fire alarms are located at every stair well and exit. Call the switchboard ("00") to have it pulled if you are unable to do it yourself.
    • Proceed with an orderly evacuation. If possible meet the Fire Department or safety officer outside to explain the nature and location of the fire.
    • When the fire alarm sounds, the building should be evacuated immediately. Faculty and laboratory assistants should close the doors to their labs and/or offices as they leave the building. As everyone leaves he/she should advise any persons seen lagging to also leave the building.
    • If the alarm does not work when it is pulled, the person knowing about the fire should notify the switchboard ("00") and it is recommended that they proceed at once to notify other people in the building by knocking on all office, classroom, and lab doors as they exit the building.
    • After the fire prepare a report on the Incident Report Form and give it to the professor in charge of the laboratory.

In Case of Other Incidents (gas leaks, floods, etc.)

  • For emergencies and after hours notify the Dept. of Public Safety (529-2222).
  • In case of gas or water leaks. Faculty should be familiar with the location of the water and gas mains.
  • In case of electrical failure notify physical facilities work desk, (529-529-6111) The fume hoods in room must be reset.
  • Prepare a written report on the Incident Report Form (Appendix C) and give it to the Professor in charge of the laboratory and to the Chair of the Department.

Chemical Storage

  • Volatile organic solvents will be stored in either a vented (Fire Marshall approved) cabinet for flammables or an explosion proof refrigerator. In the event that solvents must be stored outside they must be in solvent storage cans.
  • There will be separate, labeled areas for acids, bases (in solution), oxidizers, solvents, and water sensitive reagents.
  • Gas cylinders must be secured at all times. A cart is available for moving cylinders.
  • Only minimum amounts of chemicals are to be ordered and stored.
    • The general rule is one and one-fourth year (summer to summer).
    • Ethers, other highly flammable or peroxide forming reagents, and reagents with short shelf lives should be ordered on an "as needed" basis.
    • All chemicals should be dated.

Routine and Hazardous Waste Disposal

  • All waste material from laboratory experiments shall be placed in the appropriate waste container which has been well labeled. These containers are to be removed from the lab to the waste storage area as soon as all sections of the laboratories are finished.
  • Documentation of types and quantities of wastes is mandated by OSHA regulations. Each container should have a sheet recording the volume and type of each waste put in it. When the container is full, Environmental Health and Safety is to be notified and a pick up scheduled.
  • Separate containers are to be provided for heavy metal wastes. Excess water is to be removed by evaporation prior to disposal. A careful record of which metals are in the container must be maintained.
  • Mercury and mercury containing wastes are to be disposed of in a separate, closed, and labeled container for recycling.
  • Oxidizing and Reducing Agents are to be placed in separate containers.
  • Separate containers are to be provided for halogenated and non-halogenated organic wastes.
  • Maintain an ongoing dialogue with Environmental Health and Safety.