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General Bulletin 2004-2006

The Miami Plan for Liberal Education

Descriptions of Thematic Sequences (PAGE 6 OF 6)

MTH 2 Basic Mathematical Tools for Science.

Scientists today use a variety of mathematical tools, including calculus, discrete mathematics, and statistics to describe physical, biological, and social systems. These mathematical subjects are developed in separate Foundation courses, but the development is stronger because the last two courses are built on the foundation of Calculus I. Helps students with interests in the sciences better understand and apply some of the mathematical and statistical models used in these disciplines.

  1. MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF) (5), or
    MTH 153 Calculus I (MPF) (4), or
    MTH 157 Calculus I (5); and
  2. MTH 231 Elements of Discrete Mathematics (3); and
  3. STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
    STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Business majors will not receive credit for this sequence.

MTH 3 Almost Linear Structures—Models for Physical Science.

The goal is to extend the derivative and antiderivative ideas from Calculus I and II by building on the linear function concept from MTH 222. Scientists use linear functions to model the economy, atomic structure, chemical reactions, and other phenomena. MTH 252 develops the derivative of a multivariable function as an approximating linear function, just as the graph of a function of one variable looks like a line segment near a point where the derivative exists. This allows the extension of important optimization techniques to multivariable functions. MTH 347 uses all available tools to generalize and solve antiderivative problems crucial to science. This sequence combines theory and practice and is the traditional path to upper division mathematics. MTH 222 and 252 may be taken in either order or concurrently. Prerequisite: Calculus I (MPF) and Calculus II.

  1. MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3); and
  2. MTH 252 Calculus III (4); and
  3. MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

MUS 1 Performance of Music.

Study and apply music performance in solo and ensemble settings in order to examine and evaluate musical style, emotional and programmatic aspects of composition in performance, the interrelationship of instruments in larger contexts, and the involvement of personal technique, style, and emotional context. Prerequisite: Not for beginning performers. Admission only to students granted "sophomore standing" by the music department after an audition or semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 142 or 144.

  1. Three semesters minimum of private study, including at
    least one semester at 300-level with a prerequisite of
    "junior standing" granted by the music department after a
    semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 242 or 244.
    Courses available:
    MUS 242, 342 (2)
    , 344 (3-4)
  2. Four hours minimum of ensemble. No more than two hours per
    semester may be applied. MUS 106.B Marching Band cannot
    fulfill this requirement. You are encouraged to be involved in
    more than one ensemble for the duration of the sequence.
  3. Juried half-recital (20 minutes of music minimum) given in your
    junior or senior year (0). The recital must be a lecture-recital
    or must have program notes written by you.

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

MUS 2 Music Composition.

Focuses on composing from selected perspectives: (1) strict models of the receding past (early 19th century), (2) traditions in the electronic music of the recent past, (3) conventional forms from the current mass media, and (4) personal models developed by the student. Students study primarily the music of Western culture and write their own compositions. Designed for students already having both experience in performance on an instrument or voice and an understanding of a basic musical language through conventional music theory studies.

  1. MUS 301 Counterpoint (3), and
  2. MUS 303 Electronic Music (3), and
  3. MUS 371 Composition (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

MUS 3 African and African-Derived Music in the Western World.

Focuses on the development and influence of African-derived music in the western world, which includes not only North America but also the Carribean and South America. The subject is examined from several historical as well as musical perspectives: (1) African music in the traditional context and its defining factors on the lives and culture of Western African societies and people; (2) The Atlantic slave trade and the development of African-influenced genres in the West; (3) The impact of the development of and changes in Western societies (i.e., emancipation, segregation, unemployment, etc.) and the music that results . At the conclusion of this sequence, students should be able to integrate the material covered into their knowledge of American musical and social history and have a deeper understanding of how societal structures and racial identity have affected music.

  1. MUS 285 Survey of African Music in the Diaspora (3); and
  2. MUS 385 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel, and Soul (3); and
  3. MUS 386 The History and Development of Hip-Hop Culture in America (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

NSC 1 Naval Science: History of Warfare.

Examines the evolution of strategic principles and the influence of economic, psychological, moral, political, and technological factors on strategic thought. Covers the evolution of warfare from 600 B.C. to present, naval warfare from 1500 to present, and amphibious warfare from 1800 to present. Through literature, you are exposed to differing perspectives, including official records of the event, personal experiences of participants, and post-event analysis by researchers. Engage in a critical analysis of great captains, military organizations, and military theorists of history.

  1. NSC 311 The Evolution of Warfare (3); and
  2. NSC 202 Seapower and Maritime Affairs Seminar (3); and
  3. NSC 411 Amphibious Warfare (3)

Note: Open to all majors.

NSC 2 War: An Extension of Politics.

Examines world politics, historical role played by the military in the outcome of those politics, and possible political methods to avoid future military action. Explores the complexity of world politics driven by differences in economics, population, culture, and philosophy, and studies the historical outcome of incidents where military action occurred as well as those incidents resolved without military involvement.

  1. POL 271 International Politics (MPF) (4), or
    POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3), or
    HST 219 U.S. Diplomatic History to 1914 (3), or
    HST 222 U.S. Diplomatic History Since 1914 (3); and
  2. NSC 202 Seapower and Maritime Affairs Seminar (3), or
    NSC 311 The Evolution of Warfare (3), or
    NSC 411 Amphibious Warfare (3); and
  3. POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3), or
    POL 374 Comparative Foreign Policies (3), or
    POL 381 Global Governance (3), or
    POL 382 International Law (3), or
    HST 275 20th Century European Diplomacy (3), or
    HST/ENG/.C Interdisciplinary Special Topics: Alternatives to War (4), or
    HST 431 The U.S. - Vietnam War (3)

Note: Majors in the departments of History and Political Science must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

NSC 3 The Naval Sciences: An Integrated Study of Naval Engineering, Navigation, and Piloting.


Going to sea and surviving for extended periods of time require unique and diverse knowledge in the subject areas. Engages in a critical examination of naval engineering systems, celestial and electronic navigation, and the practice of safely piloting a waterborne vessel.

  1. NSC 102 Naval Ship's Systems (3); and
  2. NSC 301 Navigation I (4); and
  3. NSC 302 Navigation II (3)

Note: Open to all majors.

PHL 1 Applied Ethics.

Develops insight and expertise in dealing with ethical matters that you are likely to confront in your personal and professional life beyond the university.

  1. PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (MPF) (3); and
  2. PHL 312 Contemporary Moral Problems (4); and
  3. PHL/ Feminist Theory (4), or
    PHL/ENG/PSY/REL 360.A Confronting Death (4), or
    PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4), or
    PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHL 2 Ethics in Health Care.

Explores moral issues in health care today and helps you develop sophisticated skills for addressing these issues.

  1. PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (MPF) (3); and
  2. Two from the following:
    PHL/ENG/PSY/REL 360.A Confronting Death (4)
    PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4)
    PHL 475 Justice in Health Care (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHL 4 Metaphysics and Epistemology.

Presents a range of philosophical outlooks and methods regarding the fundamental questions: what is real and how do we know it? Explores these questions as they are manifested in the history of philosophy.

  1. PHL 101 Knowledge of World, God, and Morality (MPF) (3), or
    PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (MPF) (3), or
    PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (MPF) (3); and
  2. PHL 221 Problems of Metaphysics and Knowledge (3); and
  3. PHL 301 Ancient Philosophy (4), or
    PHL 302 Modern Philosophy (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHL 5 Reasoning.

Focuses on the fundamental aspects of logic, as manifested in thought and language. Shows that reasoning occurs in both formal and interpretive modes, and that principles exist for the analysis and evaluation of reasoning in these modes. The emphasis is on developing skill in the application of such principles and on an appreciation of the overall scope of logic.

  1. PHL 273 Formal Logic (MPF) (4); and
  2. PHL 263 Informal Logic (4); and
  3. PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHS 1 Biophysical Health Across the Life Span.

As one ages, the body changes in physical appearance, health, and ability to perform, usually in a negative way. Certain aspects of the aging body are regulated by factors beyond our control (e.g., genetics); however, lifestyle (e.g., nutrition, exercise) from birth to adulthood influences biophysical health to a large extent. Learn how biophysical health can be improved, maintained, or impaired by factors beyond and within one's control over time. Explore reasons for the systematic patterns of the unequal distribution of health and health services among persons of different age, gender, socioeconomic status, and culture.

  1. PHS 188/188.L Exercise and Health (MPF) (3,1); and
  2. PHS 297 Children's Exercise and Fitness (3), or
    PHS 407 Food and Nutrition for the Elderly (2), or
    PHS 408 Perinatal and Child Nutrition (3); and
  3. NSG 441 Health and Aging: Current Perspectives and Issues (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Physical Education, Health, and Sport Studies or Nursing.

PHY 1 The Physical World: Contemporary Physics.

Option One—experimental emphasis, stresses experimental, hands-on experience in the laboratory. Option Two—theoretical emphasis, stresses modelling and simulation approaches to problem solving. Extends the basic foundation in the broad area of physics developed in "The Physical World." Provides in-depth developments of topics in modern and contemporary physical science. The goal is to provide a level of understanding and skills in contemporary scientific methodology to enable further study in the sciences or to provide a substantial technical background for a future career.

  1. PHY 182, 184 The Physical World II and Laboratory (MPF) (4,1); and
  2. PHY 291, 293 Contemporary Physics and Laboratory (4, 2); and
  3. Experimental Option: PHY 292, 294 Electronics for Scientists and Engineers (3, 2), or
    Theoretical Option: PHY 286 Computational Physics (3)

Note: Although laboratory sections are listed as separate courses in this Bulletin, they are integral corequisites to the companion courses. Not open to majors in the Department of Physics.

PHY 2 Your Place In the Universe.

For untold generations, humans have gazed at the stars, planets, and cosmos, and asked what is it all, and how do I fit in? This sequence attempts to address this timeless, universal, and totally human question from the viewpoint of modern science. The Foundation course provides an overview of our present understanding of the universe and some insight as to how we came to such an understanding. The second course addresses the crucial question, how do we know what we claim to know? Here, the observational foundation of our theories are examined in detail. The final course addresses several topics from astronomy that currently are without explanation.

  1. PHY 111 Introduction to Astronomy and Space Physics (MPF) (3); and
  2. PHY 211 Observational Foundations of Astronomy (3); and
  3. PHY 311 Contemporary Astronomy (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Physics.

POL 1 Comparative Analysis of Foreign Policy.

Explores the study and substance of foreign policy. The sequence begins by analyzing the broader international and theoretical contexts of foreign policy, then moves into finer analysis of particular issues confronting national governments in the construction and pursuit of their foreign policy objectives. Completes the sequence with a country or region-specific course that examines in greater detail theories, contexts, and issues explored in earlier courses.

  1. POL 271 International Politics (MPF) (4); and
  2. POL 374 Comparative Foreign Policies (3), or
    POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3); and
  3. POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3), or
    POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3), or
    POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy (3), or
    POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

POL 2 Effective Citizenship: Making a Difference.

Provides knowledge and skills required for active political participation and leadership. Provides a solid foundation of understanding institutions and processes of politics and the dynamics of political beliefs and behaviors. Take POL 141 first, then take all remaining courses in any order. Sequence of four courses.

POL 141 The American Political System (MPF) (4); and
POL 354 Political Parties and the Election Process (3); and
POL 355 Public Opinion and Political Behavior (3); and
POL 357 Politics of Organized Interests (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

POL 3 National Political Institutions.

Enables you to understand the political system in which you live, how it operates or fails to do so, where and how citizen influence is applied, and how to assess proposals for reform. Take POL 141 first, then select three additional courses from the options listed. Sequence of four courses.

POL 141 The American Political System (MPF) (4); and
POL 343 American Presidency (3)
POL 344 U.S. Congress (3)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

POL 4 Political Thinking.

Involves systematically related, in-depth study within a single department. Focuses on the ways people understand and analyze political events and the ways people devise a basis for making judgments about the best courses of action in order to affect circumstances in desired ways.

  1. POL 201 Political Thinking (MPF) (4); and
  2. POL 302 Classical Political Philosophy (4); and
  3. POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

POL 5 Public Law.

For students interested in the role of law in our society as it defines power distribution within government as well as the relationship between government and the individual. By means of case study, Socratic method, research, and writing, you study judicial process, administrative and constitutional law, civil liberties, and criminal justice. You are required to take POL 141 as a Foundation course and three of the 300-level courses. Sequence of four courses.

POL 141 American Political System (MPF) (4); and
POL 351 Criminal Justice (4)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 353 Constitutional Rights and Liberties (4)
POL 363 Administrative Law (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

POL 6 Public Management.

Gain an understanding of the importance and workings of governmental agencies, their influence on society and daily life, and their prospects for promoting general welfare. Confronted with both theoretical issues and practical problems, you are encouraged to be a real-world problem solver through an understanding of the "fourth branch" of government, the bureaucracy. Sequence of four courses.

  1. POL 141 American Political System (MPF) (4); and
  2. POL 261 Introduction to Public Administration (MPF) (4); and
  3. Two from the following:
    POL 362 Administrative Politics and Decision Making (3)
    POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
    POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
    POL468 Public Personnel Management (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

PSE 1 Chemical Engineering Principles.

Provides an understanding of basic chemical engineering principles, concepts, and methodologies and how they are applied to the design and performance analysis of industrial processes. Prerequisite: (PSE 204) grade of C- or better in CHM 141, 142; MTH 151, 251.; and CSA 141 or competence in spreadsheeets. (MME/PSE 313) grade of C- or better in PHY 182, and PSE 204. (PSE 403) grade of C- or better in MME/PSE 313, MTH 245, and MME/PSE 314.

  1. PSE 204 Material and Energy Balances (3); and
  2. MME/PSE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3); and
  3. PSE 403 Heat Transfer (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Paper Science and Engineering. Majors in the Department of Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering must take PSE 313 at the second level.

PSY 1 Perspectives on Psychopathology.

Uses a psychological perspective to consider the personal and interpersonal experience of psychopathology and to analyze the impact of psychopathology on society as a whole. Begins with a general examination of individual and social psychopathology and builds toward in-depth exploration of selected specific individual or social issues related to psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4).

  1. PSY 242 Abnormal Psychology (3); and
  2. PSY 343 Psychopathology (3); and
  3. PSY 345 Childhood Psychopathology and Developmental
    Disabilities (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.

PSY 2 Patterns in Human Development.

Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change. How does our biological makeup interact with our physical and social surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A scientific approach to developmental psychology requires us to think critically in examining theories and research and to understand the contexts in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and research are conducted. Engage with other learners as you reflect on ideas about why we develop the way we do. Such reflection provides an informed basis for acting on issues affecting children, youth, families, and elders. Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4), or EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (MPF) (3).

  1. PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3), or
    EDP 356 Human Development (3); and
    The second and third courses must be selected in order of their postion in the life span, as follows:
  2. PSY 332 Child Development (3), or
    FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (3); and
  3. PSY 333 Adolescent Development (3), or
    FSW/ (481.A) Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)
    or
  4. PSY 333 Adolescent Development (3), or
    FSW/ Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3); and
  5. PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in the Department of Educational Psychology and Department of Family Studies and Social Work must choose a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

PSY 3 Ergonomic Design for People.

Gives in-depth exposure to the science and practice of ergonomics, which can be defined as enhancing the fit between people and their tools and environments. Ergonomics can be best approached as a multidisciplinary problem-solving activity requiring a critical awareness of the physical environment and attributes of the human "actor" participating in that environment. Psychology, in its systematic examination of human attributes, provides one of the core disciplines in the field. Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4).

  1. PSY 273 Introduction to Perception (3); and
  2. PSY 453 Human Factors (3); and
  3. Fitting the Environment to the Human Body (3), or
    PSY 462 Work-Space and Work Organization (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.

PSY 4 Developmental Patterns in Adulthood.

Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change. Adulthood and aging are a culmination of lifespan development. How does our biological makeup interact with our physical and social surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A scientific approach to the study of aging requires us to think critically in examining theories and research and to understand the contexts in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and research are conducted. Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4), or EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (MPF) (3).

  1. PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3), or
    EDP 356 Human Development (3), and
  2. PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (3); and
  3. PHS 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (4), or
    GTY 466 The Family in Later Life (3), or
    GTY 472 Minority Aging (3), or
    SOC/GTY/ Sociology of the Older Woman (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in the departments of Educational Psychology, Physical Education, Health, and Sport Studies, and Sociology and Gerontology must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

PSY 5 Cognition: Understanding and Improving Thought.

Offers opportunity to reflect upon reasoning, those processes used to create, maintain, modify, and evaluate beliefs about the world. Begins by introducing the study of cognition within the discipline of psychology; the second course emphasizes specific cognitive processes (e.g., language) and methods and theories associated with their study; the third course offers an in-depth analysis of current theories and methods of studying cognition within a circumscribed topic area.

  1. PSY 271 Cognition (3); and
  2. PSY 372 Learning and Cognition (4), or
    PSY 374 Psychology of Language and Thought (3); and
  3. PSY 470 Seminar in Cognition (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.

REL 1 Religion and American Life.

Acquaints you with fundamental themes in the relationship between religion and society, as exemplified in the development of American religious pluralism in theory and practice, as well as in the impact of religious themes in the development of an American cultural identity.

  1. REL 101 Varieties of Religious Expression (MPF) (3), or
    REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (MPF) (3), or
    REL 103 Religion, History and Society (MPF) (3); and
  2. AMS/REL 241 Religions of the American Peoples (4), or
    AMS/REL 242 Religious Pluralism in Modern America (4); and
  3. AMS/REL 341 Protestantism and the Development of
    American Culture (4), or
    AMS/REL 442 Religion, Society, and Culture in New England (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

REL 2 The Historical and Comparative Study of Religion.

Uses the approach of the history of religions to provide perspective continuity and depends heavily on the study and interpretation of classical foreign-language texts in English translation, while using case studies, surveys, and field reports. Unlike some sequences in the humanities that concentrate on religious ideas and doctrines, this sequence utilizes categories developed from the field of comparative religion to acquaint students with the diversity of religious phenomena. Emphasizes the importance of studying religion in a comparative and global context; allows a choice of emphasis of either major Eastern or Western religious traditions, at the second level.

  1. REL 101 Varieties of Religious Expression (MPF) (3); and
  2. REL 202 Religions of Asia (3), or
    REL 211 Introduction to the Religion of Ancient Israel (3); and
  3. REL 302 Methods for the Study of Religion (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

REL 3 Religion and Philosophy of Buddhist Asia.

Seeks to give students a firm grounding in the patterns of thought, symbolism, and behavior originating in and associated with Buddhism. Students follow the path of Buddhism from its birth in Upanishadic India to its function as a bridge culture knitting together much of Asia.

  1. PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India and South Asia (MPF) (3); and
  2. REL 323 Buddhism in India and South Asia (3); and
  3. REL 324 Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Philosophy or Comparative Religion.

REL 5 Jewish Civilization Through History.

Acquaints students with the history of the Jewish people through their religious culture, social ideas, and political institutions; helps students understand the distinctive forms of Jewish ethnic self-identity as they have developed through history; and helps students appreciate both the positive and negative aspects of the interaction of Jews with Christians and Muslims in a variety of geographical and cultural settings.

  1. HST 346 Medieval Jewish History (3); or
    REL 211 Introduction to the Religion of Ancient Israel (3), or
    REL 213 Judaism in the Modern World (3); and
  2. Two from the following:
    REL 385 The Religious Roots of Anti-Semitism (3), or
    REL 388 Jerusalem: The Meeting of Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Holy City (3), or
    REL 465 The Holocaust (4), or
    REL 475 Judaism in Modern Israel (4)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

RUS 1 Russia and the Soviet Union.

Examines Russian culture, society, and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective, including major Russian literary works, historical patterns, and political leaders and parties from the 10th century to the present. By considering this interaction, you gain meaningful insights into the development of Russia as well as acquire useful perspectives on Western society.

  1. RUS/ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (MPF) (3), or
    RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation:
    From Tolstoy to Present (3); and
  2. HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3), or
    HST 375 Russia and the USSR from 1855 to the Present (3); or
    HST 475 Images of Russia At Home and Abroad: 16th Century to Present (3); and
  3. POL 331 Development of the Soviet Polity (3), or
    POL 332 Politics of the Soviet Union (3)

Note: Not open to Russian majors or majors in the departments of History or Political Science.

RUS 2 Russian Culture.

Examines Russian culture from the point of view of artistic media, including major literary works, films, and varieties of folkloric expression. Russian folklore, film, and literature often explore some of the same issues, central to the society they reflect, like rebellion and revolution, alienation and the creation of a community, and the intricacies of social and sexual relationships. Through the study of diverse elite and popular approaches to these topics, you gain an appreciation of some pervasive Russian attitudes and concerns.

  1. POL/ Topics in Russian Culture and Civilization (3); or
    RUS 137 Russian Folklore (MPF) (3), or
    RUS/ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in
    English Translation (MPF) (3); and
  2. RUS/ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation:
    Tolstoy to Present (3), or
    RUS 257 Russian Literature in English Translation: Pasternak to Present (3); and
  3. RUS 263 Soviet Cinema (3)

Note: Not open to Russian majors.

SOC 2 Applied Social Science Methods.

Emphasizes the applied dimensions of social research, and reviews the basic methodologies social scientists employ in their research. Although you receive exposure to the techniques involved, emphasis is on the thinking processes involved in doing social research and in applying research findings. Learn how to frame questions, link them to basic concepts in sociology and anthropology, how to decide on appropriate methodologies, how to examine data, and how to link the results of research to theoretical and applied issues. Prerequisite: SOC 151 (MPF) (3) or ATH 155 (MPF) (3).

  1. SOC 262 Research Methods (4); and
  2. ATH 265 Language and Culture (3); and
  3. ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Sociology and Gerontology or the Department of Anthropology.

SOC 3 Sociological Perspectives on Inequality.

Uses a sociological perspective to approach the issues of social, political, and economic inequality in contemporary society, paying particular attention to inequality as it is determined by class, race, and gender. Begins with an examination of theories of social stratification; then follows a sequence of courses that allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the major dimensions of social inequality. Prerequisite: SOC 151 Social Relations (MPF) (3) or BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (MPF) (4).

  1. SOC/ Sociology of Gender (3); and
  2. BWS/SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3), or
    BWS/SOC 448 The African American Experience (3); and
  3. SOC 372 Social Stratification (3), or
    SOC 411 Social Conflict (3), or
    SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)

Note: Not open to sociology or gerontology majors.

SOC 4 Sociological Perspectives on Criminality and Deviance.

Uses a sociological perspective to understand and critique the issues of conformity, crime, justice, deviance, and the legal system in contemporary and past society, paying particular attention to the social construction of legality, normality, and crime as it is determined by various cultural contexts. Begins with an examination of the basic theories and components of deviance/conformity, then follows a sequence of courses to examine and develop an understanding of the criminal system. Concludes with an in-depth review of juvenile legal structures. Students must apply for this Thematic Sequence; enrollment is limited.

  1. SOC 202 Social Deviance (4); and
  2. SOC 352 Criminology (3); and
  3. SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3), or
    SOC 414 Penology (3)

Note: Not open to sociology or gerontology majors.

SPA 1 Second Language Acquisition.

Offers students the opportunity to develop insight into and develop genuine appreciation for information on how education in second language acquisition (SLA) can be integrated with recent knowledge from cognitive theory and research on learning strategies. Includes information on the structure and function of language, linguistic and psychological processes, multicultural influences and interactions, and theories and methods for development of effective learning strategies in SLA.

  1. ENG/ Language Awareness (3); or
    SPA 233 Language Development (3); and
  2. Theories and Methods of Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (3); and
  3. SPA 428 Phonemic and Prosodic Changes Associated with Second Language Learning (3).

Note: Not open to speech pathology and audiology majors.

SPA 2 Exploring Social Emotional and Communication Consequences in Special Populations.

Offers students the opportunity to develop insight into: (1) the problems facing physically, mentally, communicatively, culturally, or socially challenged individuals in our society; (2) the development of structures and environments needed for such individuals to communicate effectively, and (3) how these environmental modifications can be implemented. Provides specific information on recognizing and treating physical and communicative disorders, with emphasis placed on those problems that impact the normal development of speech, hearing, and language.

  1. SPA 127 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3); and
  2. EDP 256 Psychology of Learners with Exceptionalities (3); and
  3. SPA 427 Alternative Communication Systems for the Severely Handicapped (2) and
    SPA 427.L Laboratory Experience in Alternative Communication Systems for the Severly Handicapped (1); or
    EDP 493 Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities: Social Edu- cational, and Legal Issues (3).

Note: Not open to speech pathology and audiology majors.

SPN 1 Literature and Culture in Spain.

Focuses on the literature of Spain, exploring the interrelationships among texts, history, and culture. SPN 313, a Foundation course, emphasizes skills in the analysis and interpretation of Spanish texts; SPN 413 explores social and historical circumstances (Christian reconquest, rise of monarchy, colonialism, tradition, and modernity) as represented in Spanish literature; SPN 420 engages in an in-depth exploration of an important cultural theme in Spanish literature, such as explorations of national identity, medieval and Golden Age views of love, urban versus rural culture, and the literature of the Spanish civil war. Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.

  1. SPN 313 Introduction to Literary Texts: Spain (MPF) (3); and
  2. SPN 413 Texts and Contexts: Spain (3); and
  3. SPN 420 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spain (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

SPN 2 Literature and Culture in Spanish America.

Focuses on the literature of Spanish America, exploring the interrelationships among texts, history, and culture. SPN 314, a Foundation course, emphasizes skills in the analysis and interpretation of Spanish American texts; SPN 414 explores social and historical circumstances (colonialism, national independence, and issues of national development) as represented in Spanish American literature; SPN 430 provides an in-depth exploration of a central cultural theme in Spanish American literature, such as women in colonial Spanish America, ethnicity in literature, and the literature of revolution. Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.

  1. SPN 314 Introduction to Literary Texts: Spanish America (MPF) (3); and
  2. SPN 414 Texts and Contexts: Spanish America (3); and
  3. SPN 430 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture:
    Spanish America (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

SPN 3 Spanish Linguistics and Culture.

Focuses on the study of language as a sign of cultural identity and as a social marker. Although the focus is on Spanish, the general goal is to develop the ability to think critically about the connection between language and the social and cultural contexts in which it develops and exists. Learn to collect and interpret linguistic data, discuss historical events and conditions that have determined the evolution of Spanish dialects and the establishment of a standard, and evaluate current linguistic conflicts in the Spanish-speaking world.

  1. SPN 312 Introduction to Spanish Language and
    Linguistics (3); and
  2. SPN 412 Hispanic Language and Culture (3); and
  3. SPN 440 Selected Topics in Hispanic Language and Culture:
    Minority Languages in the Spanish-speaking World (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

STA 1 Quality Issues in Contemporary Business and Industry.

Provides sufficient understanding of the factors influencing quality and organizational productivity. Upon completion, you should be able to critically examine work systems and play a leading role in the improvement of any work process in which you are involved. Key themes include: data based decision-making, use of statistical tools for process analysis and quality improvement, measurement of quality, Total Quality Management, quality leadership, employee involvement, and the relationship between work processes and quality improvement systems.

  1. 1. DSC 205 Business Statistics (4), or
    STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
    STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4); and
  2. MGT 302 Operations Management (3); and
  3. DSC/STA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
    MME 334 Quality Planning and Control (3); and
  4. MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Management. Majors in the departments of Decision Sciences and Management Information Systems; Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering; and Mathematics and Statistics must select a minimum of nine hours from outside their department of major.

STA 2 Applied Statistics.

Provides a basic understanding of the statistical data analysis procedures of estimation and hypothesis testing and their use in data-based decision making. Based primarily on the "classical" assumptions of random sampling and normal distributions, data analysis applications range from one and two population problems to more complex problems of rMMEession and design of experiments. The first course, chosen from three options, introduces additional statistical procedures that go beyond the "classical" assumptions. Considers examples from a variety of disciplines and life experiences and employs statistical software extensively.

  1. STA 261 Statistics (MPF) (4), or
    STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
    STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4); and
  2. STA 363 Regression and Design of Experiments (3); and
  3. STA/DSC 333 Nonparametric Statistics (3), or
    STA/DSC 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
    STA/DSC 432 Survey Sampling in Business (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Majors in decision science and management information systems must select a statistics course at the third level.

THE 1 Modern Theatre and Drama.

Study of the influences, backgrounds, playwrights, and theatre artists that have brought about contemporary theatre production practice, style, and dramaturgy. The eclecticism of 20th century theatre reflects the shifting realities of science, culture, politics, and aesthetics in a way that mirrors our attempts to understand ourselves and our world. The objective is to reach an integrative knowledge of the connectedness of art and society to understand how in creating an image of our lives, in forging new realities, in exploring new forms and styles, theatre artists have helped define our response to the world and our experience.

  1. THE 101 Theatre Production I: Theory and Analysis (MPF) (3); and
    THE 103 Theatre Production I Laboratory (MPF) (1); or
    THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (MPF) (3); and
  2. Two from the following:
    THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
    THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
    THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Theatre.

WMS 1 Women and the World.

This sequence focuses on understanding women's historical and contemporary socio-cultural and political realities from an international perspective. Students will learn to use gender as a category of analysis, to understand complex issues and processes related to an increasingly interconnected world system and the ways women and gender are implicated in these processes, and to apply this knowledge to the topical issues of either the environment and natural resources or the politics of varied forms of cultural representation and interpretation.

  1. WMS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies; and
  2. WMS/POL 346 Global Gender Politics; or
    WMS/HST 450 Contemporary Womens World History; and
  3. WMS/REL 333 Religion, Dress, and Status; or
    WMS/GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment

Note: Not open to women's studies majors.

ZOO 1 Concepts in Physiology.

Provides an understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in physiological systems. Begins with a Foundation course then provides more depth to cellular and molecular mechanisms of action in physiological processes.

  1. BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (MPF) (4), or
    ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF) (4); and
  2. ZOO 202 Patterns in Development (4), or
    ZOO 203 Cell Biology (3); and
  3. ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (5)

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Zoology.

ZOO 2 Animal Diversity.

Illustrates the diversity of organisms within the Kingdom Animalia. This diversity includes variation in body structure and function, life history traits, and ecological roles. Upon completion, students will be able to describe major patterns in variation among animal taxa, understand mechanisms that lead to creation of such variation, and provide detailed examples of animal diversity.

  1. ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4); or
    BOT/MBI/ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (4); and
  2. ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3); or
    ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3); and
  3. ZOO 311 Vertebrate Zoology (4); or
    ZOO 312 Invertebrate Zoology (4).

Note: Not open to zoology majors.

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