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General Bulletin 2004-2006

Programs of Study

The College of Arts and Science

General Information

The College of Arts and Science has as its primary purpose provision for a liberal education, which has been defined traditionally as one that assures intellectual enlargement through general study of arts and science. A liberal education should expand students' awareness of diverse approaches to understanding and transmitting knowledge and free them from the narrow perspectives of specialization uninformed by a general knowledge of the various systems of scientific and humane thought that have shaped civilizations. This generalized inquiry provides the basis for a sense of community within the College of Arts and Science and the understanding necessary to an enlightened re-evaluation of culture.

The College offers the degrees Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in International Studies, and Bachelor of Science. An associate's degree is also offered at Middletown campus; this program is described in the Hamilton and Middletown chapter.

Accreditation

Departments accredited by professional associations are: the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry by the American Chemical Society, the Department of Psychology by the American Psychological Association, and the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology by the American Speech and Hearing Association.

General Requirements

These are the general requirements of the College of Arts and Science for graduation:

  • Fulfill the Miami Plan for Liberal Education (MP), the College Requirement (CAS), and the requirements of your major.
  • Earn a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 and a 2.0 average in all courses taken in your department(s) of major.
  • Earn at least 128 semester hours, 56 must be advanced (at 200 level and above).

If you are a transfer student, you must take a substantial portion of your major requirements at Miami. You must consult with the Chief Departmental Adviser of your major department at the time of transfer.

The College Requirement (CAS)

The divisional requirement in Arts and Science is called the College Requirement (CAS). If you are working toward the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.), you must fulfill all sections of the CAS; if you are working toward the Bachelor of Science (B.S.), you must fulfill only CAS-A (foreign language), but the B.S. requires more hours of concentration in your major. In many cases, you can fulfill sections of the Miami Plan and the College Requirement with the same course. This is shown in a chart later in this section.

The College Requirement includes:
CAS-A Foreign Language
CAS-B Humanities
CAS-C Social Science
CAS-D Natural Science
CAS-E Formal Reasoning

When you plan your program, keep these important points in mind:

  • Although some CAS and Miami Plan courses overlap, you cannot use all courses that fulfill sections of the Miami Plan to fulfill sections of the College Requirement. See the chart later in this section.
  • Some courses you take for the Miami Plan or the College Requirement can also help fulfill your major requirements. In addition, any course cross-listed in two or more departments can be used to satisfy a requirement appropriate to any of the departments in which it is listed.

CAS-A Foreign Language

Direct acquisition of a different communication system facilitates access to a foreign culture. It also promotes understanding of how language structures human consciousness, increases the understanding of your own language, and makes possible a more informed awareness of the interaction between language and other social institutions.

All foreign languages taught at Miami are applicable for this requirement. They include Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Latin, Portuguese, Russian, and Spanish. If you take a course with a 202-level course prerequisite, that course automatically satisfies CAS-A.

Greek 202 or Latin 202 may fulfill either CAS-A or CAS-B-LIT, but not both.

Requirement: The foreign language requirement may be met in any one of the following ways:

  • By passing the 202 course (or its equivalent in a program abroad), or a language course at the 300 level or above. Other 200-level courses or courses in English translation do not apply for this requirement.
  • By passing the foreign language portion of the Advanced Placement examination with an appropriate score. This test, sponsored by the College Entrance Examination Board, is usually administered during the junior or senior year in high school. Information on Advanced Placement and acceptable scores is in the Academic Planning chapter of this Bulletin.
  • For Bachelor of Science students only, this section of the College Requirement may also be met by passing a reading examination in a foreign language over suitable material from within your discipline. Information on this examination is available from any foreign language department.
  • International students whose native language is not English may use English to satisfy the foreign language requirement. (See the Director of International Programs.)
  • Students who are fluent in a language not offered at Miami University must petition the College of Arts and Science Committee of Advisers to satisfy this requirement through another college or university.
  • In some language departments admission to language skills courses may be denied to native or quasi-native speakers and heritage speakers.

The foreign language placement guide in the Academic Planning section describes the background necessary to enter a course at a certain level; this will help you choose your first course. Placement tests do not award academic credit.

CAS-B Humanities (9 semester hours)

Liberally educated students become familiar with and understand human values expressed through society. They know events and ideas that help form ideals, classical and contemporary literature that expresses beliefs, and religious and philosophical principles that stand behind actions. They are cognizant of processes whereby these values and works came into being, of methods by which they may be examined, and of needs and desires they express and fulfill.

Requirement: You must complete at least six of the required nine semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and Science in two of the following four categories: history, literature, philosophy, and religion. These hours may also be used to fulfill Group II (Fine Arts, Humanities) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF II A or B or Group III (U.S. or World Cultures) if designated MPF III. The additional three hours may be from other courses not in the categories listed above as long as they have been approved by the College of Arts and Science and are designated as CAS-B in the course descriptions.

“History” includes all courses offered by the Department of History.

“Literature” includes all literature courses offered by the departments of Classics; English; French and Italian; German, Russian, and East Asian Languages; Spanish and Portuguese; and Theatre. These literature courses are designated CAS-B-LIT in the Courses of Instruction chapter. Greek 202 or Latin 202 may fulfill either CAS-A or CAS-B-LIT, but not both.

“Philosophy” includes all courses offered by the Department of Philosophy, except PHL 273 or 373, which can only be used to fulfill CAS-E.

“Religion” includes all courses offered by the Department of Comparative Religion.

CAS-C Social Science (9 semester hours)

Through study of social science (the systematic study of human behavior, human institutions, and theoretical models through which human beings attempt to organize their lives), liberally educated students become familiar with regularities and variations in human behavior, with explanations of these regularities and variations, with methods useful in systematically and objectively validating propositions concerning these phenomena, and with potential for analyzing human behavior objectively.

Requirement: You must complete at least six of the nine required semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and Science in two of the following six categories: anthropology; economics; geography except GEO 121, 424, 431, 432; political science; psychology; and sociology and gerontology. These hours may also be used to fulfill Group II (Social Science) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF IIC or Group III (U.S. or World Cultures) if designated MPF III. The additional three hours may be from other courses not in the categories above as long as they have been approved by the College of Arts and Science and are designated as CAS-C in the course descriptions.

“Anthropology” includes all courses offered under the anthropology area.

“Economics” includes all courses offered by the Department of Economics.

“Geography” includes all courses offered by the Department of Geography except GEO 121, 424, 431, and 432.

“Political Science” includes all courses offered by the Department of Political Science.

“Psychology” includes all courses offered by the Department of Psychology.

“Sociology and Gerontology” includes all courses offered in the sociology and gerontology areas.

CAS-D Natural Science (10 semester hours)

The liberally educated student learns to understand natural phenomena through observations and experimentation. Physical sciences are involved largely with behavior of energy, particles, atoms, and molecules. Biological sciences are concerned with nature, variation, richness, and interactions of phenomena of life. The natural science requirement introduces you to various aspects of scientific inquiry as practiced in botany, chemistry, geology, microbiology, physical geography, physics, and zoology. Laboratory experience is included to demonstrate the relationship between theories or models used within a given science and experimental results.

Requirement: You must complete at least 10 semester hours from courses within the College of Arts and Science natural science areas, including at least three semester hours in physical science and three in biological science. One course must be either a laboratory course or a course that includes laboratory work; these courses are designated CAS-D/LAB in course descriptions. Nine of these hours may also fulfill Group IV (Natural Science) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF IV.

Physical science includes all courses offered by the departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Geology, and Physics; AER 118; GEO 121, and GEO 424. (Other geography courses may be used to fulfill CAS-C, social science.)

Biological science includes all courses offered by the departments of Botany, Microbiology, and Zoology and GEO 431, 432.

CAS-E Formal Reasoning (3 semester hours)

Liberally educated students enhance their capacity to reason through the study in inductive and deductive thinking. Disciplines that employ formalized languages as the means to develop such thinking include mathematics, statistics, logic, and linguistics.

College courses in formal reasoning explicitly develop the student's ability:

  • To generate conjectures and hypotheses inductively by examining patterns, trends, and examples and counter-examples;
  • To confirm or reject these conjectures by formal deductive logic;
  • To recognize that certain types of knowledge are dependent upon the application of systematic argument based on specific sets of assumptions; and
  • To begin to apply skills of formal reasoning and critical thinking to different sets of assumptions to generate different systems of knowledge.

Requirement: You must complete at least three semester hours chosen from the courses listed below. Courses listed below do not apply for any other sections of the College Requirement (CAS). These hours may also be used to fulfill Group V (Mathematics, Formal Reasoning and Technology) of the Miami Plan if they are designated MPF V.

ENG/SPN 303, GER/ATH 309 Introduction to Linguistics (4)
MTH 121 Finite Mathematical Models (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
MTH 251 Calculus II (4)
PHL 273 Formal Logic (4)
PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)
STA 261 Statistics (4)

You should consult the mathematics and statistics placement guide in the Academic Planning chapter or an adviser in the department if you are thinking about taking a mathematics course for this requirement.

Basic Requirements: Bachelor of Arts (A.B.)

Miami Plan Foundation
MPF
Fulfills Both
MPF & CAS
College of Arts & Science
CAS
I. Composition (6 hrs) ENG 109; 111-112; 113    
    CAS-A Foreign Language:
• Pass a course at the 202 level, or higher; NO courses in translation
•  Earn required score on CLEP or AP test; see Bulletin for details

II. Fine Arts, Humanities,
Social Science (12 hrs)
A. Fine Arts
(at least 3 hrs)
B. Humanities
(at least 3 hrs)

 

 

 

C. Social Science
(at least 3 hrs)

MPF Fine Arts courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
ART 185, 186, 187, 188, 280;
MUS
185, 189;
THE 101, 191

MPF Humanities courses that also fulfill CAS-B:

  1. HST 111, 112, 121, 122, 197, 198, 224, 225, 296
  2. CHI 255; CLS 121; ENG 121, 122, 123, 124,125,131, 132, 133, 134, 141, 142, 143, 144,161,162,163, 164, 165, 168, 248, 251, 252, 254, 255, 271; FRE 131; GER 161, 231, 251, 252, 311; JPN 231, 255; LAS 254; RUS 137, 255; SPN 313, 314
  3. PHL 101, 103, 104, 105, 131
  4. REL 101, 102, 103, 213

Additional Hours: AMS 101; COM 135; ENG 171, 202; FST 201; GER 151; ITL 221

MPF Social Science courses that also fulfill CAS-C:

  1. ATH 155, 175, 185
  2. ECO 131, 201, 202
  3. GEO 101, 111, 201
  4. POL 141, 142, 159, 201, 221, 261, 271
  5. PSY 111
  6. SOC 141, 151, 152; GTY 154

Additional Hours:
BWS
151; COM 136, 143; EDP 101, 201; FSW 160;
ITS 201; PHS 276; SPA 211, 223; WMS 201

CAS-B Humanities (9 hrs)
•  Take 6 hours from two of the following four areas in the College:

  1. History – any HST course; CLS 101, 102
  2. Literature – any CAS-B Lit course in ENG, CLS, THE, or foreign
    language course
  3. Philosophy – any PHL course except 273, 373
  4. Religion – any REL course

• Take additional 3 hours from any of the areas above or the following MPF courses; AMS 101; ART 185, 186, 187, 188, 280; COM 135, 206; ENG 171, 202; FST 201; GER 151; ITL 221; MUS 185, 189

CAS-C Social Science (9 hrs)
• Take 6 hours from two of the following six areas in the College:

  1. Anthropology – any ATH course
  2. Economics – any ECO course
  3. Geography – any GEO course, except GEO 121, 424, 431, 432
  4. Political Science – any POL course
  5. Psychology – any PSY course
  6. Sociology & Gerontology – any SOC or GTY course

• Take additional 3 hours from any of the areas above or the following MPF courses; BWS 151; COM 136, 143; EDP 101, 201; FSW 160; ITS 201; LAS 207, 208; PHS 276; SPA 211, 223; WMS 201

III. Cultures (6 hrs)
A. United States (3 hrs)

B. World (3 hrs)

NOTE: Choose MPF III (U.S. Cultures/World Cultures) courses to fulfill CAS-B and CAS-C

MPF U.S. Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
AMS 101; COM 206; ENG 162, 202, 248, 254, 271; GER 151; HST 111, 112; LAS 254

MPF World Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-B:
ARC 161; ART 279; CHI 251, 252, 255; CLS 101,102; ENG 168; GER 161, 231, 251, 252, 311, 321, 322; HST 121, 122, 197, 198, 207, 208, 209, 224, 225, 296; ITL 221; JPN 231, 255, 279; MUS 185; PHL 101, 161; REL 207, 209, 279; RUS 137

MPF U.S. Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-C:
ATH 185; BWS 151; ECO 131; GEO 201; POL 142, 159; PSY 210; SOC 141, 152; SPA 211; WMS 201

MPF World Cultures courses that also fulfill CAS-C:
ATH 175, 207, 208, 209; BWS 209; GEO 101,111, 207, 208, 209; ITS 201, 208; LAS 207, 208; POL 208, 221, 271; SOC 208

IV. Natural Science
(9 hrs, including a lab)
A. Biological Science
(at least 3 hrs)

B. Physical Science
(at least 3 hrs)

MPF Natural Science courses that also fulfill
CAS-D; courses in parentheses ( ) are lab courses:

Biological Science:
BOT (115), (116),131, (155), 171, (191); MBI 111, (115), (116), 121, (123), 131, (143), (161); ZOO (113), (114), (115), (116), 121, (161), (171)
Physical Science:
AER 101, 118, (204); CHM (111), (131), 137, 141, 141.M, (144), (145), (153); GEO (121); GLG 111, (115.L), 121, 141; PHY 101, (103), 111, 118, 121, 131, 141, 181, 182, (183), (184)

CAS-D Natural Science (10 hrs, including a lab)

• Take 3 hours from courses in the College in the biological sciences (Any course in BOT, MBI, ZOO; or GEO 431, 432)

• Take 3 hours from courses in the College in the physical sciences (Any course in CHM, GLG, PHY; or AER 101, 118, 204; GEO 121, 424)

• Take additional hours from either category above; one course must be, or include, a lab designated as CAS-D/LAB in the Bulletin.

V. Mathematics, Formal
Reasoning, and
Technology (3 hrs)
MPF Mathematics, Formal Reasoning,& Technology courses that also fulfill CAS-E:
ATH 309; ENG 303; GER 309; MTH 121, 151,
153, 249; PHL 273; SPN 303; STA 261
CAS-E Formal Reasoning (3 hours)
• Take 3 hours within the College of Arts & Science from the list
to the left, or PHL 373
Historical Perspective Course
Focus: 12 hours (Thematic Sequence – 9 hours; Senior Year Capstone Experience – 3 hours)
Advanced hours (200 level and above): 56 hours minimum
Hours in the major: 24 hours minimum; some departments require more
TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 128 hours minimum
GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 2.0 cumulative; 2.0 in all courses taken in your department of major

Basic Requirements: Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

Miami Plan (MP) College of Arts and Science (CAS)
English Composition: 6
Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science: 12
United States and World Cultures: 6
Natural Science: 9
Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology: 3
Perspectives (Historical)
Focus: 12
CAS-A, Foreign Language: 0-14
In addition, B.S. students only: passing a reading examination in a foreign language over suitable material from within student's discipline.
Advanced hours (those at 200-level and above): 56 minimum
Hours in the major: 24 minimum; some departments require more
TOTAL SEMESTER HOURS REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 128 (minimum)
GRADE POINT AVERAGE REQUIRED FOR GRADUATION: 2.0 cumulative and 2.0 in all courses taken in your department of major

Area of Major

Within the College of Arts and Science, there are three divisions (areas) of major: humanities, social science, and natural science. Interdisciplinary majors (American studies, black world studies, international studies, journalism, and women's studies) are not placed in one division of major, but may have courses that apply to various sections of the Miami Plan or college requirement.

In order for you to understand these areas and how they pertain to the College Requirement, we list below all majors in Arts and Science and which area the major is in.

Humanities Social Science Natural Science
Classical humanities Anthropology Biochemistry
English (all major programs) Diplomacy and foreign affairs Botany
French Economics Chemistry
German Geography Engineering physics
Greek Gerontology Geology
History Mass communication Mathematics and statistics
Latin Political science Microbiology
Linguistics Psychology Physics
Philosophy Public administration Zoology
Religion Sociology  
Russian Speech communication  
Spanish Speech pathology and audiology  
  Strategic communication  
  Urban and regional planning  

Departmental Honors

The College offers a program in departmental honors for students who qualify for and desire independent work in a major field of study under the guidance of a faculty mentor(s). Students who successfully complete such an effort graduate with a departmental honors notation on their transcripts and under their names in the commencement program.

To qualify for entrance into the departmental honors program, you must be a senior, a major in the College of Arts and Science, and have a grade point average of at least 3.5 in the major in which departmental honors work is desired. You must meet specific requirements of the department or academic program in which honors work is to be done; you must consult with the appropriate department or program director about specific requirements.

Students who qualify, register for course 480 (include department abbreviation; for example, BOT 480): departmental honors (1-6, maximum 6) for a minimum total of 4 semester hours and a maximum total of 6 semester hours. These credits may be taken in one or more semesters of your senior year. Approvals of the department chair or program director and the faculty mentor of your honors work are required for registration.

Expectations are rigorous and demanding, but the nature of projects vary. Projects might involve independent readings, creative efforts, internships, or research, based in the laboratory, field, or library. The project must result in a tangible product, such as an examination, written report, paper or monograph, oral presentation, work of art, or documentary.

Departmental honors in the College may be coordinated and integrated with work for Senior Directed Study in the University Honors Program. A common project may serve both departmental honors and university honors but separate and distinct presentations must be made to the department or program and to the University Honors Program for evaluation to earn both honors notations.

Notes on Credit Restrictions

Before registering for your courses, you should keep in mind these restrictions on credit:

  • You may not earn credit for a lower-numbered course in a department if you have already taken a closely related, higher-numbered course for credit. For example, if you have passed French 201, 202, you cannot take French 101, 102 and receive credit for them.
  • Credit is not given for closely related courses in two or more divisions.
  • You cannot register for more than 20 hours in a semester except with the approval of the Dean.

Combined Programs

Combined programs require students to transfer to other institutions to complete professional training programs. These are also called 3+1 or 4+1 programs (three or four years here, one year at another institution) or 3-2 programs (three years here, two at another institution).

Please understand that in most cases we cannot guarantee your acceptance into a program at another institution.

Clinical Laboratory Science

Clinical laboratory scientists apply scientific background and skills to supervision and performance of diagnostic procedures to determine presence or absence of disease and to monitor response to treatment.

Miami offers two baccalaureate degree programs that include a 12-month laboratory "clinical year." In the 3+1 program, you take three years at Miami followed by an internship to receive a B.S. in clinical laboratory science. In the 4+1 program, you take four years at Miami to earn an A.B. or B.S. in zoology, chemistry, or microbiology, and then you enter the clinical year.

After completing either program, you are eligible to take national registry examinations. Please understand that Miami cannot guarantee your acceptance into a clinical year site.

3+1 Program

This program requires 96 pre-clinical year semester hours at Miami, 32 in advanced courses. You take an interdepartmental sequence of courses in chemistry, microbiology, and zoology. Specific requirements include: general microbiology, pathogenic microbiology,and immunology, a year of general chemistry and a year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and biochemistry), one year of general biology; a course in mathematics; competency in computer usage; and completion of a foreign language at second-year level.

You must have at least a 2.5 cumulative grade point average to be eligible for this program.

During your junior year, you must file a petition in the dean's office of the College of Arts and Science to be graduated in this program. When you apply for a clinical year at a hospital, you must have a letter of intent from the Registrar of Miami University.

During your clinical year, you will be registered for MBI 487-488-489 at Miami. These courses fulfill the Miami Plan Capstone Experience requirement. Clinical laboratory rotations and lecture series may include hematology, chemistry, bacteriology, immunology, virology, parasitology, mycology, forensics, and toxicology. After you complete your clinical year and certify this to the Office of the Registrar, you will be awarded the B.S. in clinical laboratory science.

Affiliated training hospitals for this program include University of Cincinnati Hospital in Cincinnati; Wright State University in Dayton; Southwest General Health Center near Cleveland; Children's Hospital Medical Center of Akron; St. Elizabeth Medical Center in Covington, Kentucky; Parkview Memorial Hospital in Fort Wayne, Indiana; and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

4+1 Program

For this program, you choose a major in chemistry, microbiology, or zoology and fulfill all departmental, Arts and Science, and Miami Plan requirements for the baccalaureate degree. Pre-clinical year course requirements are: a year of general chemistry, a year of organic chemistry (or organic chemistry and biochemistry), a year of introductory biology, and one course in mathematics and general microbiology.

During fall semester of your senior year, you apply to enter a clinical year program at any hospital approved by the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences in the U.S.

For more information about either program in clinical laboratory science, see the program adviser in the Department of Microbiology.

Engineering

Students desiring an engineering degree from another school in addition to a Miami degree may arrange either A.B. or B.S. 3-2 programs with any engineering school.

A.B. requirements for the 3-2 program are in the next section under Arts-Professional Arrangement. B.S. requirements for the 3-2 program are equivalent to these, except for deletion of the A.B. College of Arts and Science Requirement sections A through E, inclusion of the B.S. College of Arts and Science Requirement section A, and substitution of an appropriate B.S. curriculum instead of an A.B. curriculum. Completion of the 3-2 engineering program satisfies the Miami Plan Capstone Experience requirement.

At Miami your major requirements must be completed unless they are continued in engineering school by recommendation of the major professor and approval of the Committee of Advisers. In particular, you may wish to major in engineering physics, a program described in this chapter with the College's major programs.

Miami has cooperative arrangements with Case Western Reserve University, Columbia University, and Washington University (St. Louis), so that any student satisfying the appropriate 3-2 program requirements will be accepted by Case, Columbia, or Washington University and will receive the Miami degree (A.B. or B.S.) upon receiving the engineering bachelor's degree or sooner.

Environmental Management and Forestry

Miami has a cooperative agreement with Duke University School of the Environment, which allows students to attend Miami for three years and Duke for two years. You receive a B.S. from Miami and either a Master's in Forestry (M.F.) or a Master's in Environmental Management (M.E.M.) from Duke.

Miami students accepted by Duke can enter the professional master's degree programs at the end of the junior year. Your Miami degree (B.S.) is granted after your first year at Duke when Miami's requirements are met.

Basic requirements for recommendation to Duke's programs are 96 semester hours at Miami, including 32 at or above the 200 level, a cumulative grade point average of 2.5, and completion of both the Miami Plan and College of Arts and Science Requirement A (foreign language).

In the first semester of your junior year, you must file a petition with the College of Arts and Science to request a recommendation for the program, and you must apply to Duke for admission. Deadline is February 15 for fall admission and October 15 for winter admission. Duke also requires the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) for admission. You should arrange to take this test the first semester of your junior year.

Courses required for the three years of study at Miami follow.

Departmental Requirements (24 hours, 14 must be advanced hours)
Either BOT 115 and 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4) or
BOT 191 General Botany (4) plus either BOT 115 (4), MBI 201 (4), or ZOO 113 (4)
BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4)
BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity (4)

Related Hours
Thematic Sequence in chemistry (18 hours)
ECO 201
MTH 151, 251, or 249
STA 261

Recommended Electives
ENG 215, 313
, 437, 447, 448
GLG 111, 115.L
IES 431, 450
PHY 171, 172, 181, 182
POL 261, 362
CSA 163, 253, 283

Environmental Science Co-Major

The Environmental Science Co-Major provides a broad-based environmental science background preparing students to pursue a wide variety of career paths or post-graduate degrees. The term "co-major" is unique and indicates that students must be concurrently enrolled in and must complete another major at Miami University. The co-major complements the primary major, which provides significant depth and breadth in an academic discipline. There is no specific degree designation (e.g., A.B., B.S.) for the co-major; students receive the degree designation for their primary major. See requirements for the co-major listed later in this Bulletin.

Arts-Professional Arrangement

In addition to the combined programs above, we offer the Arts-Professional Arrangement as another way to earn a professional degree in less than normal time. This arrangement is open only to students working for the Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) degree.

This program allows you to substitute your senior year at Miami with the first year of an accredited professional school. Schools include those in business administration, dentistry, engineering, forestry, law, medicine, nursing, public health, or theology.

The Miami A.B. is usually awarded at commencement following the first year in professional school. If you have not earned at least a 2.0 grade point average for your first year of professional school, your Miami degree will not be awarded until you have finished the professional degree.

To be graduated under the Arts-Professional Arrangement, these requirements must be met: you must earn at least 96 Miami semester hours, including 32 hours at 200 level or above, with a 3.0 grade point average; you must complete the Miami Plan requirements, the College Requirement, and all requirements of your major (except those that can be continued in professional school); and you must file a petition with the College of Arts and Science by the end of your junior year.

Students transferring to Miami at the end of their freshman year may petition for a reduction of the 96 Miami hours required for this program, as long as this reduction does not exceed 32 hours.

For more information, consult an adviser in the College of Arts and Science.

Planning for Law School

Law school is a popular option for Arts and Science majors. More than 300 students applied to law school in 2002; about 75% gained admission to at least one institution.

You are encouraged to take a very broad liberal arts program. Common majors include economics, English, history, and political science. Majors in other fields however, such as philosophy, classics, foreign language, mathematics, statistics, and psychology have also been successful preparations for students entering law school.

According to The Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools, “While no single curricular path is the ideal preparation for law school, you should choose courses that sharpen analytical reasoning and writing skills. Law schools prefer students who can think, read, and write well, and who have some understanding of what shapes human experience.”

Most law schools have high standards for grade point average (g.p.a.) and all require the Law School Admission Test (LSAT). In recent years, the average Miami applicant has had a 3.2 g.p.a. and a 154 score (on the scale of 120-180) on the LSAT. You should consult a pre-law adviser before taking any course on a credit/no credit (pass/fail) basis.

For more information about law school and the application process, talk to one of our pre-law advisers in the departments of Political Science, English, Classics, and History.

Planning for Medical, Dental, and Veterinary Schools

Most medical, dental, and veterinary schools limit admission requirements to allow for students from a variety of undergraduate programs. All schools recognize the desirability of a broad education that includes a strong foundation in natural sciences, the basis for study and practice of health professions; communication skills, essential for developing successful relationships with the public and professionals; and social sciences and humanities, in order to better understand yourself and others.

Therefore, you should follow an undergraduate program that is as broad and comprehensive as possible in order to prepare for a career in a people-oriented profession in a changing society. Pursuing a double major in sciences is not advised if it is done at the expense of obtaining a broad education.

Common admission requirements include two years of chemistry, two years of biology, one year of physics, and one year of English. Requirements of schools may vary; schools may recommend additional courses. You should therefore consider individual requirements of schools and plan your curriculum accordingly.

Students who plan to go to professional schools should see an academic adviser before taking any course on a credit/no-credit basis.

Many students planning to attend medical, dental, or veterinary school major in zoology, microbiology, chemistry or biochemistry.

A recommended program for your first year is:
CHM 141, 142 College Chemistry (3,3) or CHM137, 142 (4,3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2) or CHM 153, 161 (2, 2)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4,4) or ZOO 113, 114 (4,4), or
MTH 151, 251 (5,4)
ENG 111, 112 College Composition, Composition and Literature (3,3)
Electives (applying toward the College Requirement and Miami Plan)

Science courses are demanding and, for many freshmen, the first semester is a difficult period. Your electives, then, should not be a difficult course for you.

During your sophomore and/or junior year, take organic chemistry and lab (CHM 241, 242 and 244, 245 or 251, 252 and 254, 255) and physics and lab (PHY 171, 172 and 183, 184 or 181, 182 and 183, 184). A year of biology (BOT/MBI/ZOO 115, 116 or ZOO 113, 114) should be taken sometime during your first two years.

Medical schools require the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT), dental schools require the Dental Aptitude Test (DAT), and most veterinary schools want the Graduate Record Exam. You are strongly urged to talk with a pre-professional adviser as early as possible in preparing for one of these careers.

For information, talk with one of our pre-medicine advisers in zoology or in chemistry and biochemistry, microbiology, physics, or psychology. Pre-dentistry and pre-veterinary advisers are also in zoology.

Planning for Optometry School

Typical admission requirements for optometry school include one year of English, one year of biology, two years of chemistry, one year of physics, one year of mathematics (calculus and statistics), one year of psychology, one year of sociology, one semester of microbiology, and one or two semesters of physiology. Since specific requirements vary, you should contact schools where you may apply, and plan your curriculum accordingly. Most pre-optometry students major in zoology, chemistry, or microbiology.

Optometry schools require the Optometry Admission Test, which is given in February and October each year.

A recommended program for your first year is:
BOT/MBI/ZOO 115, 116 Biological Concepts (4, 4)
CHM 137, 142 College Chemistry (4, 3) or CHM 141,142 (3, 3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
ENG 111, 112 College Composition, Composition and Literature (3, 3)
MTH 151 Calculus (5)
Electives (choose from CAS requirements and Miami Plan Foundation courses)

For more information, consult with the pre-optometry adviser in the Department of Zoology.

Planning for Pharmacy School

Because the Doctor of Pharmacy is now the only accredited degree for pharmacy, you should complete a bachelor's degree (usually in zoology or chemistry), or at least two years of prerequisite course work, and apply to a Doctor of Pharmacy program.

Typical prerequisites for pharmacy school include course work in calculus; inorganic, organic, and analytical chemistry; English, microbiology, physics, statistics, and zoology. Since specific requirements vary, contact schools of interest, and plan your curriculum accordingly. For more information, consult with the pre-pharmacy adviser in the Department of Zoology.

Planning for Physical Therapy School

If you are interested in a career in physical or occupational therapy, you should take courses that meet the prerequisites for graduate degree programs in those areas. The Pre-Physical and Pre-Occupational Therapy Program at Miami is designed to provide students with the basic science and related courses needed for background preparation and admission into an accredited physical or occupational therapy program.

The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has mandated that all physical therapy programs offer master's degrees to retain or earn certification; many also offer doctoral degrees. Occupational therapy programs may offer baccalaureate, master's, or doctoral degrees. However, according to the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), all baccalaureate occupational therapy programs nationwide are expected to transition to master's degree granting programs by 2007. Therefore, students interested in physical or occupational therapy usually complete their bachelor's degree at Miami and then apply to a master's or doctoral degree program in physical or occupational therapy at another school.

Because there is no uniformity in prerequisite courses required by physical or occupational therapy programs, you must contact schools for their requirements. Select courses at Miami that will meet requirements for your program.

The following courses are required prior to admission by most programs. Note: This is only a general guideline.

BOT/MBI/ZOO115 Biological Concepts (4) or ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4)
BOT/MBI/ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (4) or ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4)
CHM 137, 142 College Chemistry (4, 3) or CHM 141, 142 (3,3)
CHM 144, 145 College Chemistry Laboratory (2, 2)
ENG 111 or 112 English Composition (3, 3)
PHS 381 Biodynamics of Human Activity (4)
PHS 468 Physiology and Biophysics of Human Activity (3)
PHY 171, 172 College Physics (3, 3)
PHY 183, 184 Physics Laboratory (1,1)
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
ZOO 201 Comparative Anatomy (4) (meets human anatomy prerequisite)
ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4) (meets human physiology prerequisite)

Other suggested courses include:
CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4)
CHM 332 Outlines of Biochemistry (4)
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
PHL 131 (3) or PHL 375 (4) or SOC 357 (3) (one semester of
philosophy/medical ethics)

For more information, contact a physical therapy program adviser in the Department of Zoology or the Department of Physical Education, Health, and Sport Studies.

Special Interest Areas

If you are interested in one of these areas, we suggest you look into the Arts and Science degree program(s) listed beside it.

Area Arts and Science Major
Advertising English, mass communication, speech communication
Archaeology Anthropology, classics, religion
Bacteriology Microbiology
Biology Botany, microbiology, zoology
City planning Urban and regional planning
Creative writing English/creative writing
Criminology Sociology (criminology emphasis)
Environmental science Botany (environmental science emphasis*), geography, geology (environmental science emphasis*), zoology; Environmental Science Co-major
Foreign affairs Diplomacy and foreign affairs, international studies
Forestry Botany; see also “Combined Programs”
Gerontology Gerontology, sociology
Government work Political science, diplomacy and foreign affairs, international studies, public administration, speech communication, urban and regional planning
Journalism Journalism, mass communication
Language Linguistics, speech pathology and audiology, foreign languages
Neuroscience Zoology, psychology
Personnel work Psychology (industrial organization concentration), public administration, speech communication (organizationcommunication concentration)
Pharmacy Chemistry, zoology
Physical therapy Psychology, zoology
Public relations Speech communication (public relations emphasis), English/journalism
Social work Sociology, psychology
Statistics Mathematics and statistics, statistics
Television and radio Mass communication

Teacher Licensure

Combining a teacher licensure program with a major in the College of Arts and Science makes a student eligible for two degrees: an A.B. or B.S. degree in the College of Arts and Science and a B.S. in Education degree in the School of Education and Allied Professions. Students who wish to combine licensure with an arts and science major must observe rules, procedures, and restrictions pertaining to admission to a licensure cohort.

If you choose to earn two degrees, you must meet all requirements for the Miami Plan, the College of Arts and Science, and teacher licensure. Early in your program you should plan your schedule with academic advisers from both the College of Arts and Science and the School of Education and Allied Professions.

The following departments offer the possibility of combining the teacher licensure program with an Arts and Science major: botany, chemistry, English, French, geology, German, history, Latin, mathematics, physics, political science, Russian, Spanish, and zoology.

For information, contact the Department of Teacher Education in the School of Education and Allied Professions, McGuffey Hall (513-529-6443).

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