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General Bulletin 2006-2008

Academic Planning

Educational Decisions

Choosing a Major and Making Career Choices

This is never a simple decision. Many students change majors at least once.

Although you do not need to choose a specific major, you will need to choose a division when you register. If you are undecided, you are assigned to the College of Arts and Science for advising purposes. In most cases, if you use your first year to take courses that fulfill the Miami Plan and divisional requirements, you can still complete a major program with no delay. However, to complete some majors in a four year time period, you must begin them as a first year student.

To make academic and career choices, you need to consider your interests and abilities. By now you probably have a strong sense of your academic strengths and weaknesses. Your interests, however, are still developing and, like more specific skills, depend on exposure to various activities and ideas.

The Career Exploration and Testing Center in the Student Counseling Service, 196 Health Services Building, has reading materials, computer-assisted career guidance programs, and standardized career instruments to help you learn about your interests, abilities, and values and to relate them to your academic and career choices. Occupational and educational information are available to allow you to explore your options. Career assistants can help you work through the decision-making process and find needed resources; they can make career counseling appointments for you with the professional staff.

A two-credit-hour course, EDL 100 Career Development for College Students, provides opportunities to learn more about selecting a career and appropriate major. It is only offered to first- and second-year students.

If you want information about specific careers or internships, visit the Office of Career Services at 241 Hoyt Hall. This office hosts 300-350 employers each year for on-campus interviews and has an extensive Career Resource Center containing numerous career books and directories. Career and job-search advising is available by appointment and during specified walk-in hours. In addition, the Career Services website at www.muohio.edu/careers/ not only provides useful career information, but also links to dozens of other career-related sites.

Finally, don't forget to talk with advisers in any academic division or department; they can advise you on curriculum, career opportunities within fields, and opportunities for advanced study.

Programs with Special Admission Requirements

Some programs have special requirements that call for careful planning. For example, you must be admitted by the School of Fine Arts or the Department of Nursing (Hamilton & Middletown campuses only) before you declare the major. Also, teacher licensure programs and science and technical major programs require specific courses that are usually taken in order.

It is important to check your major’s requirements. Programs are listed in each division’s chapter.

At present, majors with limited or restricted entry include mass communication, journalism, technical and scientific communication, nursing, social work, special education, speech communication, speech pathology and audiology, all licensure programs in the Department of Teacher Education, all programs in the Department of Physical Education, Health, and Sport Studies, strategic communication, the majors in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies (interdisciplinary studies; environmental science; environmental studies), and all programs in the Richard T. Farmer School of Business and the School of Fine Arts.

Academic Advising

Academic advisers are available to help you understand academic requirements and to address your concerns. They can provide you with information and resources that will help you make decisions about your class schedule, course of study, and future opportunities.

First year advisers serve as the primary academic adviser for students during their first semester at Miami. First year advisers are full time staff with master's degrees who live and work in the residence halls. First year commuter students are advised by the Commuter Center graduate adviser in the Commuter Center, located in room 100 of Shriver Center. First year students enrolled in the School of Interdisciplinary Studies (Western College Program) are assigned a faculty adviser from the Division.

In addition to the first-year adviser, students in the School of Fine Arts and the School of Engineering and Applied Science are assigned a faculty adviser during their first year to further assist them with academic requirements. .

In the second semester of your first year, or, when you transfer to Miami as an upperclass student, you will be assigned a faculty adviser in your major. For example, if you are a botany major, a faculty member in that department will be your adviser. If you change majors, your adviser will also change. Students who are undecided about their major will be advised by an academic adviser in the College of Arts and Science advising office.

Freshman Mid-Semester Grade Reports

Midterm grades are available to first year students online through BannerWeb in mid-October. In the spring semester, midterm grades are issued only to continuing students who earned 16 or fewer credit hours in their previous semester(s). Midterm grades provide students the opportunity to assess their academic performance while there is still time to improve before receiving official grades. Midterm grades are not recorded on student's academic records. First year advisers also have access to students' midterm grades, and they meet with students who are struggling to discuss strategies for improving academic performance.

Academic Support

Bernard B. Rinella Jr. Learning Center
14 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-8741

Students experiencing academic difficulty can seek assistance at the Rinella Learning Center. One-to-one and small group tutoring are available; tutoring is geared to develop self-confidence and independence. Peer tutors reinforce course material and help students to develop strategies to learn class material, prepare for homework, and take exams. For those who need help in reading and writing, tutors and a drop-in writing lab are available. A nominal fee is charged for some services. Learning specialists are also available for individual consultations.

Also coordinated in this office are academic support services for student athletes, students with LD/ADD, students on academic probation, and the scholastic enhancement and supplemental instruction programs.

Office of Disability Resources (ODR)
19 Campus Avenue Building, 513-529-1541 (TTY accessible)

For students with physical disabilities, ODR ensures program accessibility and compliance relative to Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. ODR coordinates accommodations through various campus and state agencies to provide services including, but not limited to, taped textbooks, route training, campus transportation, sign language interpreters, Realtime captioning, modified housing, testing accommodations, priority scheduling, and access to telecommunications.

Instructors’ Office Hours

Most instructors have regularly scheduled office hours to meet with students. These are usually posted outside their office doors and on the course syllabus. To make an appointment for another time, contact the instructor or department secretary.

Options for Receiving Credit

Note: Transfer credit information is in the Admission chapter.

Advanced Placement Program (AP)

Any student entering Miami can submit scores from the AP test, given by the College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement Program. Miami accepts AP scores in the areas listed below (Individual departments determine what is an acceptable score). More information is available from the Office of the Registrar, 102 Campus Avenue Building (513-529-8711).

Art History (acceptable score 3 to 5)
Credit for ART 187, 188 (6 hours).

Biology (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 (4 hours). You may not be prepared to enter a second year biological science course, however. In this case, take BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115. Permission from appropriate department chair is required to enter second year biological science as a freshman. In addition, your choice of major may require you to duplicate some course work already earned through AP.

Chemistry (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for CHM 141, 145 (10 hours).

Computer Science
A Exam (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for CSA 174 (3 hours) for a score of 4.
Credit for CSA 174, 271 (6 hours) for a score of 5.
A-B Exam (acceptable score 3 to 5)
Credit for CSA 174, 271 (6 hours) for a score of 3.
Credit for CSA 174, 274 (9 hours) for a score of 4 or 5.

Economics
Credit for ECO 201 (3 hours) for score of 4 or 5 on
microeconomics portion.
Credit for ECO 202 (3 hours) for score of 4 or 5 on macroeconomics portion.

English (acceptable score 4 to 5 in language or literature)
Credit for ENG 111 (3 hours) for score of 4, then enroll in ENG 113.
Credit for ENG 111, 112 (6 hours) for score of 5.

Environmental Science (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for ZOO 121 (4 hours)

French (acceptable score 3 to 5 in language or literature)
Credit for language or literature for FRE 201, 202 (6 hours).

German (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for GER 201 (3 hours) for score of 4, then enroll in GER 202.
Credit for GER 201, 202 (6 hours) for score of 5.

Government and Politics (U.S.) (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for POL 101 (3 hours).

History (acceptable score 4 to 5 in American, European, or World)
American: Credit for HST 111, 112 (6 hours).
European: Credit for HST 122 (3 hours).
World: Credit for HST 198 (3 hours).

Latin (acceptable score 3 to 5)
Credit for LAT 201 (3 hours) for score of 3 on Latin literature or Vergil.
Credit for LAT 201, 202 (6 hours) for score of 4 or 5 on Latin literature or Vergil.

Math
AB Exam (acceptable score 4 or 5)
Credit for MTH 151 (5 hours), then enroll in a Calculus II course. Students with a score of 3 should see a Math adviser.
BC Exam
Credit for MTH 151 (5 hours) for score of 3 or a B subscore of 4, then enroll in a Calculus II course. Proficiency credit for
MTH 251 (4 hours) may be possible; check with chief depart mental adviser.
Credit for MTH 151, 251 (9 hours) for score of 4 or 5, then enroll in a Calculus III course and/or MTH 222, or MTH 222T and 331T.

Music
Credit and acceptable score determined by department.

Physics (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Test B: Credit for PHY 171, 184 (8 hours).
Test C (mechanics): Credit for PHY 181 and 183 (5 hours).
Test C (electricity and magnetism): Credit for PHY 182 and 184 (5 hours).

Psychology (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for PSY 111 (4 hours).

Spanish
Credit for SPN 311 (3 hours) for score of 4 or 5 on language or literature.
Credit for SPN 202 and 311 (6 hours) for score of 4 or 5 on both language and literature.

Statistics (acceptable score 4 to 5)
Credit for STA 261. Some major programs will require a higher level statistics course.

College Level Examination Program (CLEP)

Contact the Student Counseling Service (195 Health Services Center, 513-529-4634) for information about CLEP.

Credit is given for satisfactory scores on some CLEP Subject Examinations. Tests are scored by the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, New Jersey. Because there is a fee for each test (see the Fees and Expenses chapter), we encourage you to take them only if you have had the equivalent of a college course in the subject area.

Miami operates a closed CLEP testing center, which means it offers these tests to Miami University students only. CLEP examinations, however, are given throughout the country at “open” testing centers.

American Government: credit for POL 141 (4 hours) for score of 55.

Calculus with Elementary Functions: credit for MTH 151 (5 hours) for score of 50.

College French, Levels I and II: credit for FRE 201, 202 (6 hours) for score of 50.

College Level Spanish Language: credit for SPN 201, 202 (6 hours) for score of 53. Credit for SPN 311 (3 hours) for score of 70 or above.

General Chemistry: credit for CHM 141, 145 (10 hours) for score of 52.

Introductory Psychology: credit for PSY 111 (4 hours) for score of 54.

Human Growth and Development: credit for PSY 231 (3 hours) for a score of 63.

Introductory Sociology: credit for SOC 151 (4 hours) for score of 55.

International Baccalaureate Program (IB)

Miami awards credit to IB diploma graduates for higher level subjects passed at a satisfactory level (minimum scores vary 5 to 7 by subject area). Subsidiary levels are not awarded credit. Departments make the final determinations on credit.

Anthropology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit determined by department.

Chemistry (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for CHM 141, 142 (6 hours) and CHM 144, 145 (4 hours).

Economics (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for ECO 201 and 202 (6 hours) .

English (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit for ENG 111 and 112 (6 hours). 

History
Credit for HST 198 (3 hours) for score of 5 or better.
Credit awarded on an individual basis for selected upper-level courses for score of 6 or 7.

Latin (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit determined by department.

Management (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for MGT 291 (3 hours).

Mathematics (acceptable score is 7)
Credit for MTH 151 (5 hours).

Philosophy (acceptable score 6 or better)
Credit determined by department.

Physics (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit for PHY 181,182 (8 hours) and PHY 183, 184 (2 hours).

Psychology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for PSY 111 (4 hours).

Spanish (acceptable score 6 to 7)
Credit for SPN 201 (3 hours).

Zoology (acceptable score 5 or better)
Credit for ZOO 115, 116 (8 hours).

Department Proficiency Examinations

These exams may be offered each semester. Each department administers its own test, and credit applies toward graduation. You may take a proficiency examination during any semester or term in which you are enrolled. See the Fees and Expenses chapter for test charges.

To be approved for a proficiency examination, you must satisfy the department that you have a reasonable chance of passing it. Normally, these examinations are for courses below the 300 level, but they may be given for advanced courses with approvals of the department chair and the dean of the division in which the course is offered.

You may obtain credit or advanced placement, or both, by examinations in areas in which you have had adequate preparation. Credit earned is traditional credit and is not counted in the admissible 32 semester hours of nontraditional credit. No grades are awarded for proficiency examinations.

See departments listed below for specific information.

Comparative Religion: see department.

English: Submit a writing portfolio to the department in the summer before your enrollment; see department brochure for specific requirements and deadline. Students whose portfolios are rated excellent receive 6 hours of credit for ENG 111 and 112; students whose portfolios are rated good receive 3 hours of credit for ENG 111 and placement in ENG 113.

Latin: see department.

Mathematics and Statistics: offered in MTH 121, 251; STA 261. Contact the department office. A group proficiency exam in MTH 151 is usually given during the first week of the first semester.

Placement Guides

Designed to help you choose your first course in the fields below, these guides describe the background necessary to enter courses at a certain level.

If you find that you have chosen a course that is too difficult, you can drop it (before the deadline to drop, listed in the Academic Calendar in the front of this Bulletin or a Course Schedule) and begin with an easier course in a later semester.

Algebra and Trigonometry

(See Mathematics and Statistics information at the end of this chapter.)

MTH 102 Intermediate Algebra (3): not usually taken by business students. Algebra preparation for MTH 123. Students with no trigonometry background should consider following MTH 102 with MTH 104 despite losing duplicated credits.

MTH 104 Precalculus with Algebra (5): covers MTH 102 and precalculus in one semester. Preparation for MTH 151.

MTH 123 Precalculus (3): preparation for MTH 151. Intended for students with three years of college preparatory mathematics including some trigonometry.

Calculus

(See the Mathematics and Statistics information at the end of this chapter.)

MTH 151 Calculus I (5): for students who have had little or no high school calculus. This is the first semester in calculus sequence MTH 151, 252.

MTH 153 Calculus I (4): for students with at least one semester of high school calculus including transcendental functions and strong precalculus backgrounds. In this case, the calculus sequence is MTH 153, 252.

MTH 157H Honors Calculus I (5): for students with outstanding ability in mathematics. Intellectually challenging in-depth development of calculus. Enrollment only by permission of department.

MTH 249 Calculus II (5): primarily for students who have AP credit for Calculus I. Limited to freshmen. Reviews concepts of limit, derivative, and integration from Calculus I, then covers same content as MTH 251 Calculus II. This is the first semester of calculus sequence MTH 249, 252 that covers same topics as MTH 151 (or 153), 251, 252.

MTH 249H Honors Calculus II (5): Honors version of MTH 249. Admission requires honors standing or permission of instructor.

Chemistry

If you did not have chemistry in high school (or you have a very weak background), it is possible to take CHM 111 before taking the CHM 140 series, although this is not recommended.

CHM 111: for nonscience majors; no previous chemistry necessary.

CHM 137, 145: for students preparing for careers in health professions and sciences, engineering, or science teaching. No previous chemistry necessary. This is the recommended track for students with little or no chemistry background and/or a weak mathematics background.

CHM 141, 145: for students preparing for careers in health professions and sciences, engineering, or science teaching. Previous high school chemistry necessary.

CHM 141M, 153, 142M, 161: for students planning careers in chemistry who are considering graduate school. A high school chemistry course is necessary. You cannot receive credit for both CHM 144, 145 and CHM 153. These four courses are the required sequence for B.S. chemistry and biochemistry majors.

Foreign Language

Placement is based on: (1) high school preparation (typically, one year of high school equates to one college semester), and (2) results of placement testing administered by Miami University. You cannot take a foreign language course for credit at a lower level than you are prepared for. After being placed, you cannot skip a course in the sequence leading to 202.

If you intend to continue studying the same foreign language as in high school, you are required to take a placement exam for that language before you enroll. Placement exams for French, German, and Spanish are taken by freshmen during Summer Orientation; transfer students take them during transfer student advising in the summer. Results are immediately available at orientation for placement and advising. Continuing students wishing to enter a language sequence should take the placement exam and then seek advising before enrolling in a course.

For other languages, placement exams are taken at home by entering freshmen prior to Summer Orientation; transfer students in Latin and Russian take them prior to transfer student advising. Examinations are returned to Miami by mail; results are available at orientation for placement and advising.

There is no award of academic credit with placement tests.

101 LEVEL: for those beginning a new language.

102 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 101 or GER 111. Also for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter the second-year level.

111 in German: review course for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter second-year level. After completing 111, students enter 102.

111 in Spanish: intensive review course for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter second-year level. After completing 111, students enter 201.

121 LEVEL: intensive review course offered in Latin for those whose placement exam scores indicate they are not prepared to enter second-year level. After completing 121, students enter 202.

201 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 102, SPN 111, or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score.

202 LEVEL: for those who have successfully completed 121, 201, or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score; this course fulfills the language requirement for the College of Arts and Science (CAS-A).

301 LEVEL AND ABOVE: for those who have successfully completed 202 or equivalent, or achieved an appropriate placement exam score. Any foreign language course at 300 level or above fulfills the language requirement for the College of Arts and Science (CAS-A), not including courses in translation.

Physics

PHY 101, 141: general physics course. PHY 103 has a prerequisite; see course descriptions.

PHY 181, 184: calculus corequisite course recommended for science, computer science, systems analysis, and engineering majors. Freshmen should enroll in PHY 181F, 182F. There is no physics prerequisite for 181, although concurrent registration in, or completion of, laboratory course PHY 183 is required. See course descriptions.

Mathematics and Statistics

Two placement tests are offered to Oxford campus students. (The regional campuses offer other standardized placement tests.) Test One must be taken before Test Two. Test One (precalculus) helps assess your readiness for calculus if you expect to take a mathematics or statistics course. Algebra, trigonometry, functions, and basic geometry are included on the test. Also take Test Two (calculus) if you have taken a semester or more of calculus, even AP calculus, during high school and expect to take a calculus course. Test Two is based on topics covered in Calculus I. More information about these tests is online (www.muohio.edu/mathstat/place.html) or available from a departmental adviser..

In the advising table below, I and II refer to Placement Tests One and Two, and I + II denotes the sum of your scores on I and II.

If you plan to and you have passed these high school classes and have these scores on I and/or II then take
Take a calculus course

a) a year of calculus, including log, exponential, and trig functions

(b) at least one semester of calculus, with strong background in precalculus

(c) three and one-half or four years of math with trig but little or no calculus

(d) three or four years of math including some trig

(e) less than three years of math

I + II from 35 to 45

I + II from 26 to 34

I from 16 to 25

I from 12 to 15

I from 8 to 11

I from 0 to 7

MTH 249 or 249H

MTH 153

MTH 151

MTH 123

MTH 104

MTH 102

Take a noncalculus course, e.g. MTH 121 or STA 261

(a) three years of math, including two years of algebra

(b) less than three years of math

I from 12 to 25

I from 0 to 11

MTH 121 or STA 261

MTH 102 or 104

Seek middle childhood licensure with a math concentration more than three years of math, including geometry, with grades of B or better from 16 to 25 MTH 151 followed by MTH 217
Seek licensure in early or middle childhood, not concentrating in math

(a) three years of math, including geometry

(b) less than three years of math

I from 12 to 25

I from 0 to 11

MTH 115

MTH 102

Since recommendations given above or online may not consider all information relevant to your situation, you should contact a departmental adviser if you have questions. The goal is to place you in a course with students of similar preparations.

To contact a departmental adviser via e-mail: placement@notch.mathstat.muohio.edu


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