CHDLT Faculty Associates

Educational Psychology

Doris Bergen
Doris Bergen’s research interests have included international evaluation of cross-cultural programs for young children, development of play and humor in early and middle childhood, effects of technology-augmented toys, adult memories of their childhood play, gifted children’s humor development, social interactions of children with special needs, effects of early phonological awareness levels on later reading ability, and developmental effects of international adoptions. Her most recent research involves investigating the Event Related Potentials (ERP) elicited in children’s brains when they are engaged in two types of videogame play. Through the Center, she also has collaborated with colleagues on a wide range of evaluation research projects for state and local agencies. She is a Miami University Distinguished Scholar, having published 13 books and over 70 book chapters and journal articles.

William Boone
William Boone, Department of Educational Psychology. My primary research interests are test design, survey design, test analysis, survey analysis, and psychometrics (Rasch Measurement). Please contact me for more information.

Darrel Davis
Darrel Davis, Department of Educational Psychology. My current research interests are Play activities and spaces, teaching and learning in the online environment, and the use of technology in diverse and developing settings.

Erin Harper
Erin Harper, Department of Educational Psychology. My current research focus involves culturally responsive school-based mental health services. I am working on projects related to school-based mental services in Belize and culturally responsive crisis intervention in Cincinnati Public Schools. I am available for discussion or collaboration with students or faculty members interested in these topics.

Amity Noltemeyer
Amity Noltemeyer, Department of Educational Psychology. My primary research interests include resilience, multi-tiered models of behavioral and academic support, and disproportionality in schools. I am working on an ongoing project related to mental health and Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in K-12 schools. I am available for discussion or possible collaboration with students or faculty members interested in these topics.

Joseph Schroer
Joseph Schroer, Department of Educational Psychology. My primary research interests are ERP research, and Mindfulness, and I am working on an ongoing project with Doris Bergen & Robin Thomas. I would love to pursue collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in either of those areas, please contact me for more information.

James Swartz
Jim Swartz, Department of Educational Psychology. My primary research interests are Qualitative Research Methods, and Instructional Design and Technology, and I am working on an ongoing project with Dr. Michele Dickey. I would love to pursue collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in transition from traditional classroom teaching to distance education, please contact me for more information.

Sarah Watt
Sarah Watt, Department of Educational Psychology. My primary research interests are examining effective interventions in math and science for students with learning disabilities, and analyzing inclusive educational frameworks to support a range of learners, and I am working on an ongoing project with Talawanda and Hamilton Public Schools. I would love to pursue collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in these areas, please contact me for more information.

Teacher Education

Michael Evans
Michael Evans, Departments of Educational Leadership & Teacher Education. My primary research interest is grassroots approaches to family, school and community partnerships. I am currently involved in an ongoing project focused on the Opt Out Movement and its impact on educational policy. My next project is going to focus on Parent Universities (community-based parent education programs). I am open to collaborating with interested students and/or faculty members. Please contact me for more information

Tracey Hoffman
Tracey Hoffman, Department of Teacher Education and Prekindergarten Coordinator for regional campuses. My primary research interests are early intervention, young children with autism/developmental delays, families and attachment in young children. I would love to pursue collaboration with any faculty members interested in these areas. Please contact me for more information.

Thomas Misco
Thomas Misco, Department of Teacher Education. My primary research interests are in Chinese student transitions to U.S. Colleges and Universities and controversial issues education in China, and am involved with citizenship education, study abroad, and curriculum projects. I am interested in collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in these areas.

Chemistry

Stacey Lowery Bretz
Stacey Lowery Bretz, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. My research interests are in developing assessment measures to diagnose chemistry misconceptions, investigating how students construct and interpret multiple chemistry representations across the macroscopic, symbolic, & particulate domains, meaningful learning of chemistry, and experiments, taxonomies, and rubrics for inquiry learning in the chemistry laboratory. Collaborations are welcome and any prospective undergraduate and graduate students are welcome to contact Dr. Bretz at bretzsl@miamioh.edu or visit http://chemistry.miamioh.edu/bretzsl

Ellen Yezierski
Ellen Yezierski, Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry. My research group focuses on improving conceptual understanding of chemistry with a focus on the dynamics of teaching chemistry and teacher change. The goal of our work is to markedly reform instruction and improve learning across a variety of grade levels (high school and college). Projects employ quasi-experimental designs as well as phenomenological methods which explore particulate-centered curricula, teacher beliefs and change, questioning strategies, chemistry self-concept, evaluating external representation use in inquiry instruction, alignment between stated and enacted curricula, and characterizing teaching and learning in chemistry outreach. My group is enthusiastic about collaborating with faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students from complementary disciplines.

Zoology

Chris Myers
Chris Myers, Project Dragonfly, Department of Biology. My current research involves inquiry-driven education, community engagement, and species coexistence at local and global scales. Our team is currently building on national and global partnerships for participatory education and conservation. I would be interested in collaboration with other faculty members with any future projects related to these topics.

Family Science and Social Work

Anthony James
Anthony James, Department of Family Studies and Social Work. My primary research interests are positive youth development, family processes, and program evaluation. I am working on an ongoing project with Kevin Bush and Amity Noltemeyer (i.e., program evaluation). I would love to pursue collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in positive youth development and/or religion and spirituality across the lifespans of childhood, adolescence, emerging adulthood, please contact me for more information.

Elise Radina
M. Elise Radina is a Professor in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work at Miami University (Oxford, OH). Dr. Radina is a qualitative methodologist whose research focuses broadly on families and health with a particular emphasis on mid and later life women in family contexts. Dr. Radina is guest co-editor for a special issue of the Journal of Family Theory & Review (Volume 4, Issue 2) on “Qualitative Methodology, Theory, and Research in Family Studies” (along with Elizabeth Sharp and Aniza Zvonkovic). Dr. Radina has focused her program of research on health and aging among mid and later life women in the context of families. She has published over 30 peer-reviewed articles that have appeared in such scholarly journals as Cancer Nursing, Family Relations, the Journal of Family Nursing, Nursing Research, the Journal of Family Theory & Review, the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, and Sociological Perspectives. Dr. Radina has also published 9 book chapters.

Speech Pathology and Audiology

Amber Franklin
I conduct clinical research aimed at developing an effective, evidence-based, and theoretically-motivated pronunciation improvement program for English Language Learners. My research and teaching interests include clinical approaches to accent modification, adult cross-linguistic phonetics and phonology, child phonology, social-cultural communication and scholarship of teaching and learning. I am also the director of the English Language Learning Pronunciation Lab.

Kelly Knollman-Porter
Research Focus 1: Provide evidence and establish guidelines for implementing intervention programs that either support use of currently available assistive technology tools or promote the development of new tools to help people with aphasia comprehend written information independently and without the need for material modification.
Research Focus 2: Establish evidence based gestural compensatory techniques and strategies that incorporate family education and training to support auditory comprehension for individuals with severe and chronic aphasia.
Research Focus 3: Examine the long-term effects of concussive and subconcussive head impacts on neurobehavioral and neurocognitive performance among collegiate varsity and recreational athletics. I would be interested in pursuing more multidisciplinary research projects which address the cognitive, behavioral, emotional or communication challenges associated with acquired or progressive neurologic disease processes. I would be interested in collaborating with other faculty members on current or future projects, and it would be appropriate for undergraduate or graduate students to contact me if interested in assisting with my current projects. I only ask that they provide a resume when contacting me about future project involvement.

Geralyn Timler
Geralyn R. Timler, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, My primary research interests are in the assessment, intervention, and generalization of intervention targets for school-age children with social communication disorders including children with language impairment, ADHD, and autism spectrum disorder. Current projects include development of social communication assessment protocols to accurately identify children’s strengths and weakness in linguistic and social interaction skills. I am interested in collaboration with students and faculty members interested in assessment and intervention issues related to social communication.
Kinesiology and Health

Thelma Horn
Thelma Horn, Department of Kinesiology and Health. My primary research and scholarly activities centre around the study of children, adolescents, and young adults in sport and physical activity contexts. In particular, I conduct research to examine if and how the behaviours of important adults (e.g., parents, coaches, teachers) influence the performance, attitudes, and behaviours of sport and physical activity participants. At this time, I am in the process of finishing up a number of faculty/student research projects and converting the results into manuscripts to be submitted for publication. Anyone interested in this work can contact me for further information.

Valerie Ubbes
Valerie Ubbes, Department of Kinesiology and Health. My primary research interests are Fruit & Vegetable Habits of Children and Health Literacy, and I am working on a school gardening evaluation project with two undergraduate students, Katie Blodgett and Aubrey Kluth. I welcome additional collaboration with students and faculty members interested in this project so please contact me for more information. You are also welcome to contact me about my Digital Literacy Partnership with the Center for Digital Scholarship at Miami University Libraries. Check out my three databases that “promote the contribution of literacy, health, and technology on learning” @ http://dlp.lib.miamioh.edu

Rose Marie Ward
Rose Marie Ward, Department of Kinesiology and Health, Affiliate of Statistics, Affiliate of Psychology. My primary research interests are college student alcohol consumption. Currently, we are examining blackouts, drunkorexia, academic consequences of alcohol consumption, and sexual assault in my lab. I would love to pursue collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in college student alcohol consumption, please contact me for more information.
Psychology

Amanda Diekman
My research program focuses on understanding group differences, stereotypes about groups, and social change. I approach these questions from a social role theory framework (e.g., Diekman, Eagly, & Johnston, 2010), which is a broad-ranging perspective that locates the root cause of group differences and beliefs about groups in the group’s position in the social structure. Much of my work recently has converged around the idea that individuals are motivated to adopt role-congruent characteristics and to avoid role-incongruent characteristics. The major focus of my research program currently is using role congruity theory to understand why women opt out of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) fields.

Paul Flaspohler
Paul Flaspohler, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests are in program evaluation and action research. I am working on several projects addressing community issues including school mental health, dating violence, and infant mortality. I would love to collaborate with students and faculty members interested in evaluation and program planning. Please contact me for more information.

Jennifer Green
While my position as a clinical faculty member does not involve research, I work with graduate and undergraduate students to gain applied experiences in psychology. One of my primary roles has been to coordinate clinical training for the Center for School Based Mental Health Programs and to provide supervision for graduate students working in the local elementary schools. Undergraduate and graduate students working in my lab have the opportunity to learn about and help to implement the Incredible Years program which is an evidenced based program designed to support children’s social, emotional and behavioral development. Related to my interest in school mental health, I have collaborated with graduate students and faculty from different disciplines to explore challenges inherent in moving clinical psychology from traditional settings (e.g., community mental health, private practice) to schools. I have also collaborated in research exploring the interdisciplinary nature of school mental health and the importance of collaboration across disciplines.
Joshua Magee

Yvette Harris
For several years, my research has been grounded in the theoretical perspective of Vygotsky, and explored the environmental contributions to cognitive development by examining the strategies that mothers use as they engage their children in a learning activity, exploring how those strategies correlate with young children’s problem solving and cognitive competence, investigating how their strategies vary according to maternal beliefs, task, and task demands, and examining at what point in time do young children benefit from parental teaching/learning interactions. The research has been supported by National Science Foundation, Miami University, the Murray Center and Proctor and Gamble. Currently, I have a new line of research focusing on the challenges of family reunification as parents return from prison.

Jonathan Kunstman
Jonathan Kunstman, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests involve understanding the psychological experience of power and motivational approaches to improving intergroup (primarily interracial) interactions from both minority and majority perspectives. Currently my work explores how emphasizing the social rewards and punishments associated with power shapes the high-power experience. My work also tests power’s effect on social cognition (e.g., perspective-taking, dehumanization). I am also exploring how minority group members’ beliefs about Whites’ egalitarian motives (i.e., perceiving Whites as primarily motivated by concerns with appearing prejudiced as opposed to truly egalitarian motives) shapes early aspects of perception (e.g., emotion perception, interpersonal sensitivity). I would love to pursue collaboration with students and faculty interested in power and intergroup relations, please contact me for more information.

Elizabeth Kiel Luebbe
Elizabeth Kiel, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests are in the development of anxiety-spectrum outcomes in young children, and what it is like to parent children at risk for anxiety. I am working on an ongoing longitudinal study that examines temperamental risk for anxiety and parenting from age 1 to 3. I would be interested in developing collaborations with other faculty who do work in school readiness, as I am developing interests in how socioemotional development impacts adjustment to kindergarten.

Aaron Luebbe
Aaron Luebbe, Department of Psychology. My research focuses on how family relationships, emotion processes, and biological responses to stress interact to put children and teenagers at risk for depression and anxiety. Current projects focus on the socialization and regulation of positive emotions, in particular, and my lab uses varied methodologies such as surveys, behavioral observation, salivary hormone collection, and functional near infrared spectrometry. I am always open to collaboration with students or other faculty and can be contacted by email at LuebbeA2@miamioh.edu.

Joshua Magee
While most people experience unwanted thinking, the emotional consequences vary widely among individuals, and can sometimes contribute to clinically impairing problems like anxiety disorders or nicotine dependence. My SCOUT lab focuses primarily on unwanted thoughts, images, and urges that are implicated in chronic mental and behavioral health conditions. Our research evaluates the mechanisms that differentiate “normal” intrusive thinking from “abnormal” intrusive thinking, and attempts to translate working models of unwanted thinking from anxiety to areas such as nicotine dependence and older adulthood. Currently most of my research effort is dedicated to a K23 award from the National Institute on Drug Abuse titled "Text Message Support to Prevent Smoking Relapse in Community Treatment Settings." In this project, we are conceptualizing nicotine craving as a type of unwanted thinking and designing a technology-informed intervention to coach individuals through cravings during quit attempts.

Dawna Meehan
Cricket Meehan, Center for School-Based Mental Health Programs, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests are K-12 school mental/behavioral health and K-12 student/youth success & wellness. I am currently working on the following projects: Making Ohio AWARE: Building Statewide Mental Health First Aid Capacity, Positive Transformations for Ohio Schools: Building Statewide Positive Supports, Community Needs Assessment Regarding Teen Pregnancy Prevention, A LifeSpan Inc. School Based Social Work Services Evaluation, and A Multi-Tiered Evaluation of the Efficacy and Effectiveness of the FLIP IT Parent Training Model. I would love to pursue collaboration with any students or faculty members interested issues related to K-12 non-academic barriers to learning and school mental/behavioral health.

Barbara Oswald
My research interests focus on understanding the neurobiology of learning and memory: brain structures and neurotransmitters that regulate encoding, storage, and retrieval of memories. Most recently, my research has focused on evaluating the role of the prefrontal cortex on learning and memory. I use a model of rabbit eyeblink conditioning to determine the effects of permanent and ‘temporary’ brain damage on acquisition and retention of a learned response. Our research has shown that select regions of the prefrontal cortex may differentially regulate initial learning and later retrieval. This research has important implications for victims of brain damage affecting the prefrontal cortex and associated structures.

Vaishali Raval
My research examines parenting, emotion and emotion communication in the family context, and child health outcomes in international populations and ethnic minority groups in the United States, particularly Asians and Asian Americans.

Cecilia Shore
Cecilia Shore, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests are cognitive development, and scholarship of teaching and learning, and I am working on an ongoing project with Scripps. At this time, additional faculty collaboration and student involvement is not practical on my current project, but if you would like more information about my work I am available for discussion.

April Smith
April Smith, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests are disordered eating and suicidality. My lab has several ongoing projects examining implicit cognition and its relation to eating disorder symptoms, cognitive bias modification for maladaptive perfectionism, body functionality and interoceptive awareness, and the development of acquired capability for suicide. When feasible, I welcome collaboration with interested faculty and students. Please feel free to contact me for more information and/or check out our lab webpage for more information on our current projects: http://miamioh.edu/cas/academics/departments/psychology/about/current-faculty-staff/smith-april/reds-lab/index.html

Brooke Spangler
Brooke R. Spangler, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests include pedagogical interventions and the scholarship of teaching and learning and socioemotional development in at-risk youth. I am currently working on a project determining how small-group discussions in a large lecture class impact student outcomes. I would love to pursue collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in projects concerning student outcomes and best practices in SoTL.

Virginia Wickline
Virginia (Ginger) Wickline, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests are the impact of Service-Learning on student development, international students/study abroad, and student development of intercultural competence. At this time, I have my hands full with ongoing projects and am therefore not interested in any particular additional faculty or student collaborations, but I could be convinced if the right project came along. If you would like more information about my work I am available for discussion.

Christopher Wolfe
Christopher Wolfe, Department of Psychology. My primary research interests are higher-order cognition particularly medical decision making, judgment and decision making, reasoning and argumentation cognitive technologies, and assessing learning outcomes. I am working on an ongoing project developing an intelligent tutoring system to help women understand and make decisions about genetic testing and breast cancer risk. I would be interested in collaboration with any students or faculty members interested in these topics. Please contact me for more information.

Anthropology

Cameron Hay-Rollins
Cameron Hay-Rollins, Department of Anthropology and Coordinator of the Global Health Studies minor. My research strengths are in mixed methods, qualitative and ethnographic research and analysis. As a medical and psychological anthropologist my abiding interests are in how people cope with illness and disease. I participate in multiple, collaborative ongoing research projects including studies on pediatric clinical communications, well-being with sickle cell disease, pediatric stroke, and infant mortality, some of which might be open to student involvement in research, however I am on leave in Fall 2015, so interested students would need to wait until Spring 2016 to pursue collaborations. I am also interested in pursuing other collaborative research projects with faculty members that address issues in global health, health disparities, and clinical communications.