Oxford Courses

These classes have been completed. Fall 2018 content will be updated when registration opens.

Monday Classes

Healthcare and Medicine from 1970 to the Present…and Future!

This course is meant to be a bit of history, a bit of autobiographical storytelling, and a look towards the future. Interaction with members of the class, questions, and perspectives are welcome.

April 2
Richard Daniels, retired President/CEO, McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital, will provide an introduction to the topics by looking at the history of medicine and hospitals.

April 9
Paul Cangemi, M.D., was an orthopedic surgeon practicing in Hamilton and Oxford until his recent retirement. He will take a trip, similar to that of Dr. Hunt’s (below), but through the lens of a medical student who entered surgery, specifically orthopedics.

April 16
Terry Hunt, M.D., has been a specialist in internal medicine for decades and still practices part-time in Oxford. He will talk about medicine from his perspective as a medical student, then through decades of practice and the changes he has seen.

April 23
Mark Clement is President/CEO of TriHealth, a major health system based in Cincinnati, Ohio. He will discuss the development, growth, and benefits of health systems with some emphasis on the partnership between TriHealth and the McCullough-Hyde Memorial Hospital.

April 30
Richard Daniels will take a look at some of the present and future innovations in medicine. Also, in this last session, the class will have plenty of time to ask questions and follow-up on any topics raised during the previous weeks.

Coordinator

Richard Daniels was President/CEO of McCulloughHyde Memorial Hospital in Oxford for 28+ years.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: April 2–April 30; 9:00–10:15am
Auditorium, Miami University Art Museum


Pinocchio: How to Make an Italian

When Italy became a unified nation in 1861 after a series of rebellions and wars of independence, a statesman declared: “Italy is made!” Then came the hard part: how to make Italians. Carlo Collodi’s The Adventures of Pinocchio appeared in 1882 when Italy and the first generation of Italians turned 21. We will discuss the puppet’s adventures and misadventures as an exploration of how Italians could or should be made.

We will read the entire text in translation: c. 150 pages, 36 chapters; c. 30 pages per lesson. Please read chapters 1-7 (c. 20 pages) before our first class meeting.

Class text: Any translation of Collodi’s book is acceptable (but not those based on the Disney movie). It’s available online: e.g. on Page By Page Books or a PDF version.

Instructor

Sante Matteo was born and spent his childhood in Italy. He is Professor Emeritus of Italian Studies at Miami University.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: April 2–April 30; 9:00–10:15am
Boardroom, Knolls of Oxford Commons


Understanding the U.S. Constitution

Five class sessions will take us from the intellectual and social origins of the U.S. Constitution, through its adoption and early “settling in,” from the Civil War through the first half of the 20th century, and then into the critical post-World War II era in the 21st century. Spoiler alert: last class ends with a question mark.

Class text: The instructor will provide a pocket Constitution/ Declaration of Independence for each enrollee.

Instructor

Susan Kay is Professor Emerita of Political Science.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: April 2–April 30; 10:45am–noon
Room 123, Police Services Center


What’s Happening Now at the Miami University Art Museum?

Telling a People’s Story The exhibition on African-American Children’s Illustrated Literature explores African-American cultural and historical identity through the lens of children’s picture-book art. The museum’s spring exhibition also presents a glimpse into the world of children’s book publishing and the development of this genre. More than 30 illustrators are represented with nearly 130 original works of art featured in many highly celebrated children’s books. This unique exhibit should not be missed by anyone who loves books and art, and especially by grandparents eager to share their literary fervor with their grandchildren. The Miami University Art Museum staff and docents will make the presentations and guide participants through the exhibit.

Coordinator

Elaine Rauckhorst has been a docent at the Miami University Art Museum since 1995, following a teaching career at the elementary and secondary levels.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: April 2–April 30; 10:45am–noon
Auditorium, Miami University Art Museum


Midday Lecture Series

Each Monday the Midday Lecture Series presents a speaker who will discuss a topic of interest and importance. Plan to bring a brown bag lunch and enjoy an ILR tradition.

April 2Dutch by Birth, Ohioan by Choice
Renate Crawford, Adjunct Professor of Physics and University Ambassador.

April 9Educating from the Ground Up: Learning about Sustainability through Food
Peggy Shaffer, Coordinator of the Miami Institute for Food and Professor of History and American Studies.

April 16The Hays Code and a Brief History of Motion Picture Censorship
Richard Brunner, lifelong movie fan with a focus on the Academy Awards.

April 23Legacies in the Landscape: Plants, People, and Invisible Ecology
Nanci Ross, Associate Professor of Ethnobotany, Drake University.

April 30Age-Friendly Oxford: Growing Older in the Oxford Area? What Will You Need?
Ann Garrison Whelpton, Oxford VillAGE Network, Co-Chair.

Coordinator

Betty Rogers, Professor Emerita of Spanish, is past Chair of ILR.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: April 2–April 30; 12:30–1:45pm
NOTE: New Start Time
Auditorium, Miami University Art Museum


American Higher Education: What It is Now, and What It Might Become

The state of higher education in the United States and its future are subjects of perennial interest for most of us—perhaps especially so in a university community such as ours. Five colleagues from the faculty and administration of Miami University will discuss the overall state of the university; student recruitment, enrollment, and success; undergraduate student culture; international education; and the core curriculum.

April 2The Value of the Liberal Arts Education
Gregory P. Crawford, President, Miami University.

April 9Meeting Enrollment and Student Success Goals in an Increasingly Competitive Environment
Michael S. Kabbaz, Senior Vice President for Enrollment Management and Student Success.

April 16John Barleycorn Must Die? The Complex Challenges Created by High-Risk Alcohol Consumption on Miami’s Campus
Michael A. Curme, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students.

April 23In the Middle of Everywhere: Comprehensive Internationalization of Higher Education
Cheryl D. Young, Assistant Provost for Global Initiatives and Continuing Education.

April 30Liberal Learning in a Global Age
Shelly Jarrett Bromberg, Associate Professor of Spanish and Director of Liberal Education.

Coordinator

William J. Gracie, Jr., Professor Emeritus of English and former Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies/ Western College Program, is Chair of the ILR Curriculum Committee.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: April 2–April 30; 2:30–3:45pm
NOTE: New Start Time
Auditorium, The Knolls of Oxford Commons

Tuesday Classes

Spring Neotropical Migrants: A Closer Look (literally!)

In the spring, most neotropical migrants are beautifully garbed as they wing northward to their nesting grounds. We will use the AREI bird banding stations to get an up-close look at these challenging species. The class will emphasize both bird identification and neotropical bird conservation.

Instructor

Dave Russell, Senior Lecturer in Biology, is the Research and Education Director for Avian Research and Education Institute, Inc. (AREI), a nonprofit organization that uses its bird banding stations in Oxford, Ohio, and Tamaulipas, Mexico, for research and as outdoor classrooms.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 10–May 8; 7:30–9:30am
NOTE: Rain on Tuesday postpones class until Thursday
AREI Bird Banding Station, Hueston Woods


Model Making for Beginners to Experts

Are you a model maker, or would you like to be one? This course is designed to bring together people with all levels of experience—beginners to long-time addicts—to share tips and ideas and to make headway on or complete a project, whether it’s a complicated model ship, a miniature room, a set of dollhouse furniture, a metal replica of a classic car, a flying model plane, etc. Registrants should plan on bringing a project or project idea to class and, over the five-week period, we’ll share problems, frustrations, solutions, and elations.

Instructor

Michael Griffith, Professor Emeritus of Theatrical Design, served as director of Miami University Theatre’s design program for 33 years. His scenic design credits encompass over 350 productions, many of which were executed as models prior to realization in full scale for production.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 1; 9:00–10:15am
Pottery Studio, Oxford Seniors


Topics of Current Interest

Current topics of discussion will be selected from various segments of our lives. The class facilitators will present factual point/counterpoint data to kick off lively, interactive discussions. They will select a topic for the first session; then the class will identify topics they want to discuss in subsequent sessions. The goal is an increase in understanding of current topics of controversy and debate.

Instructors

Rich Daniels is a retired CEO of McCullough-Hyde Hospital in Oxford.

Bill McKnight retired from General Electric, Aircraft Engines, as a Senior Technologist.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 1; 9:00–10:15am
Room 31, Peabody Hall


The Arts and Crafts Movement in America

The course will explore the Arts and Crafts movement in the U.S. in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In addition to roots in Britain and parallels on the European Continent, the Arts and Crafts movement in the US was expressed primarily in architecture and the decorative arts. Our emphasis will be on the cultural history rather than connoisseurship.
NOTE: The instructor does not do appraisals!

Instructor

Peter Williams is a University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Comparative Religion and American Studies.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 1; 10:45am–noon
Room 31, Peabody Hall


Yoga Fundamentals

The practice of yoga helps increase flexibility, mobility, circulation, and mind-body coordination. Some positions are done standing, seated, or on the floor. Adaptations are given as needed so participants can be relaxed and can focus on their breathing. Each class will end with either guided or silent relaxation. Please bring a yoga “sticky” mat to class.

Instructor

Kathy Hunter has taught yoga professionally since 1971 at various locations, including the University of Cincinnati, Miami University, in Colorado, and abroad. She is accredited through Yoga Alliance.

Dates and Location

4 Tuesdays: April 3–April 24; 10:45–noon
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons


Age-Friendly Oxford

In October 2017, Oxford City Council passed unanimously a resolution to join the World Health Organization’s Network of Age-Friendly Cities and AARP’s Livable Communities and thus commenced the Age-Friendly Oxford initiative. What does this mean for our city and the greater Oxford area? In this course, we will learn about global, national, and local age-friendly work sustained by the idea that making communities age-friendly can benefit people of all ages.

Instructor

Jessie Leek serves as Co-Chair of Oxford VillAGE Network, an all-volunteer grassroots advocacy group affiliated with Oxford Seniors, Inc., and Miami University Scripps Gerontology Center.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 1; 1:00–2:15pm
Room 31, Peabody Hall


Food Production: Humans vs. Planet Earth

The class will explore the sobering realities of industrial agriculture, issues of sustainability, and the future of food. Human population growth has put a strain on the planet. Agriculture in all its forms is the most important driver of environmental degradation and natural resource depletion. We will focus on the details that led us into the current situation and discuss what we can do to improve the likelihood of being able to produce food far into the future.

Instructor

Alfredo Huerta, Professor Emeritus of Biology, taught botany and general biology for 28.5 years. He recently co-founded the Institute for Food (IF) at Miami University and has published many papers on topics related to the adaptation of native and agricultural plants to the environment.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 1; 1:00–2:15pm
Havighurst, Oxford Lane Library


Exploring Board Games

Board gaming has experienced a renaissance in the past 25-30 years in the U.S. and Europe with the explosion of “Eurogames.” Going well beyond the days of Chutes and Ladders, Monopoly, or Scrabble, modern board games involve many forms of player interaction, including cooperative play and themes that reflect many subjects of interest. The course covers the history and evolution of board games with a focus on the modern resurgence of board gaming over the past three decades. The course ends with a “board game event,” when class participants play a modern Eurogame.

Instructor

Mark McBride, Professor Emeritus of Economics, has been playing board games for 50+ years, including competing at the World Board Game Championships.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 8; 2:45–4:00pm
NOTE: No Class April 10
Room 31, Peabody Hall


Singing for Health, Joy, Community, and Fun

Did you know that SINGING is actually good for us? The deep breathing we use when singing oxygenates our blood, increases our endorphins, and reduces stress. Furthermore, it is expressive, joyful, relaxing, and community-building. No special skills are necessary for this class except a desire to sing to your heart’s content! A variety of fun, easy, old, familiar, and new music will be used to tickle your fancy. Hope you will join us!

Instructor

Deborah Williams is a music therapist and teacher of 25+ years, who currently works as a music therapy consultant and serves on the board of directors of the American Music Therapy Association.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 1; 2:45–4:00pm
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Common


BYOB: Blend Your Own Bordeaux

A hands-on exploration of Bordeaux and Meritage red wines and the grapes that make them great. After two sessions of lecture and tasting, the class will form teams of six students to create their own Bordeaux-style blend for two sessions. Session five will be a competitive peer evaluation of all teams’ wines followed by a presentation of medals and awards during the sixth session. Come prepared with three wine glasses and a sense of oeno-adventure.

Instructor

Chris Hensey has offered ILR wine-tasting courses for more than a decade, nearly as long as he operated his Oxford wine shop. He has passed the Introductory Exam for the Court of Master Sommeliers and serves as a judge for the Cincinnati International Wine Festival.

Dates and Location

6 Tuesdays: April 3–May 8; 4:30–5:45pm
LaRosa’s
Supply fee: $60, payable with registration.


Sundown Cinema: Vietnam, We Hardly Knew Ye

Fifty years after the Tet Offensive in 1968 led to an escalation of the war in Vietnam, we will watch and discuss movies that document how the United States came to be involved in the conflict after the withdrawal of French troops from what had been a French colony, and we will consider some of the consequences of American involvement in the war.

April 3The Quiet American (2002; 1 hr. 41 min.)
Directed by Philip Noyce; based on a novel by Graham Greene; set in Saigon in the early 1950s. British journalist Fowler (Michael Caine) has been reporting on the colonial war between France and Vietnamese insurgents. He vies for the affections of a Vietnamese woman, Phuong, with a young American aid worker (Brendan Fraser), who may represent the initial incursion of the USA into the conflict after the French leave.

April 10Sundays and Cybele (French, 1962; 1 hr. 50 min.; black and white, spoken in French with
English subtitles)

Directed by Serge Bourguignon. After killing a child when his plane crashes in a Vietnamese village, French pilot Pierre (Hardy Kruger) suffers from delayed stress and partial amnesia after he returns to France, until he meets a young girl at a boarding school with whom he contrives to spend his Sundays, possibly to make amends, or to recover his memory. Can returning warriors leave the war completely behind in the killing fields, or do they bring it back home with them, with unexpected consequences for them and their society?

April 17Hearts and Minds (documentary, 1974; 1 hr. 52 min.)
Directed by Peter Davis. An examination of the conflicting attitudes of the opponents of the Vietnam War.

April 24Full Metal jacket (1987; 1 hr. 56 min.)
Directed by Stanley Kubrik. A two-segment look at the effect of the military mindset and war itself on Vietnam era Marines. The first half follows a group of recruits in boot camp under the command of the punishing Gunnery Sergeant Hartman (Lee Ermey). The second half shows one of those recruits, “Joker” (Matthew Modine), covering the war as a correspondent for Stars and Stripes, focusing on the Tet offensive.

May 1Journey from the Fall (Vietnamese, 2006; 2 hr. 15 min.)
Directed by Ham Tran. Thirteen years after the end of the Vietnam War, a family who was tragically affected by the war is forced to emigrate to America.

Coordinator

Sante Matteo, Professor Emeritus of Italian Studies at Miami University, also taught courses, gave talks, and published essays on cinema.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: April 3–May 1; 7:00–9:30pm
Leonard Theatre, Peabody Hall

Wednesday Classes

Philosophy and Contemporary Moral Issues

We will center our discussion meetings around a number of the very short essays in Peter Singer’s Ethics in the Real World: 82 Brief Essays on Things that Matter. Specific issues include philosophical and religious distinctions between ethics and morality; cheating; when may doctors kill; and the moral status of other animals. For the final class meeting, issues will be chosen by those enrolled based on other of Singer’s brief essays.

Class text: Peter Singer. Ethics in the Real World: 82 Brief Essays on Things that Matter. Princeton. University Press, 2016. Available from Amazon, $14.17 pbk.

Instructor

Rick Momeyer taught philosophy at Miami University for several decades and then retired to make room for younger, fresher teachers. With some trepidation he has elected to re-enter a classroom, perhaps to resume the kind of learning teaching always provided.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: April 4–May 2; 9:00–10:15am
Room 116, Peabody Hall


Will the REAL Cleopatra Please Stand Up?

Forget Shakespeare, Hollywood, and luridly bad novels about Cleopatra VII (69–30 BCE), the last Egyptian pharaoh. She was one of three powerful women who appalled and nearly beat the Romans at their own game, but what do we actually know about Cleopatra? We will try to sort out the outright lies, the wishful thinking, the endless fascination with and puzzling evidence for this extraordinary and powerful woman who remains shrouded in controversy.

Class text: A reader will be available at the Oxford Copy Shop two weeks prior to the start of class. Participants should watch the Claudette Colbert movie Cleopatra (available on YouTube) prior to the first class.

Instructor

Judith de Luce, Professor Emerita of Classics, is a feminist Latinist whose scholarship includes all aspects of Roman culture and history, particularly from 753 BCE–212 CE.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: April 4–May 2; 9:00–10:15am
Boardroom, Knolls of Oxford Commons


Great Decisions 2018 U.S. Foreign Policy Discussion Series

Great Decisions, a non-partisan, community-based discussion program, is offered each spring by the Foreign Policy Association in an effort to encourage deeper citizen engagement in the U.S. foreign policy-making process. Participants are obliged to read a detailed briefing report before each weekly meeting, and then actively participate in an engaging and wide-ranging discussion. Discussion topics for the spring 2018 program will be: The Waning of Pax Americana?; Russia’s Foreign Policy; China and America: The New Geopolitical Equation; Media and Foreign Policy; Turkey: A Partner in Crisis; U.S. Global Engagement and the Military; South Africa’s Fragile Democracy; and Global Health: Progress and Challenges.

Class text: Great Decisions 2018 Briefing Book; order online at GreatDecisions.org or phone 800.477.5836. Couples may share a book.
NOTE: Standard Shipping takes 10-15 days. Order Early!

Instructor

David Keitges is Director Emeritus of Miami’s Office of International Education.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: April 4–May 2; 10:45am–noon
Boardroom, Knolls of Oxford Commons


The Things They Carried: War Stories from Vietnam and Iraq

If we are to understand modern warfare at all, we might focus on fiction rather than nonfiction and be guided by eyewitnesses— combat soldiers themselves. We will read some of the most significant fiction that has emerged from the Vietnam War and the Iraq War (or Second Gulf War): Tim O’Brien’s The Things They Carried and Phil Klay’s Redeployment. O’Brien served in the 46th Infantry Regiment of the U.S. Army in Vietnam (1969–1970); Klay served in the Marine Corps in Iraq’s Anbar Province (2007-2008). We will attempt to answer questions as old as Homer: How does art bring order from disorder and meaning from calamity, even from disaster?

Class text: Phil Klay, Redeployment. Penguin, 2014. ISBN 978-159420-499-9; Tim O’Brien, The Things They Carried Broadway Books, 1990. ISBN 0-7679-0289-0.

Instructor

William J. Gracie, Jr., Professor Emeritus of English and former Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies/ Western College Program, is Chair of the ILR Curriculum Committee.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: April 4–May 2; 10:45am–noon
Room 123, Police Services Center


Artful Journaling

An art journal is a personal journal (or book) filled with any combination of art, imagery, and words. Your art journal can be any book you have on hand. On the inside pages you can use any supplies you have such as pencil, pen, colored pencils, markers, watercolors, paint, pictures, and words cut out of magazines. Combining art with keeping a journal is an excellent way to ease stress and keep us motivated to record our stories, feelings, and ideas. This will be an active class with lots of time to play.

Instructor

Judy Brewer enjoys sharing her love of journaling and is currently working in multiple journals, one of which is her Bible.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: April 4–May 2; 1:00–2:15pm
Havighurst, Oxford Lane Library


Artificial Intelligence

AI touches many aspects of our lives on a daily basis and promises to do so even more in the future. This course will look at possible advances in AI and how we can be better prepared to adapt to them. Should these innovations be embraced or feared? The presenters will be three computer scientists and two representatives from the humanities.

April 4The Silent Data Revolution on the World Wide Web
Pascal Hitzler, NCR Distinguished Professor and Director of Data Science, Department of Computer Science, Wright State University.

April 11Fuzzy Logic
Valerie Cross, Associate Professor of Computer Science, Miami University.

April 18Are You a Bot?: The Ethics of Artificial Intelligence and Human-Machine Communications
Heidi McKee, Associate Professor of English, Miami University.

April 25Privacy Implications of Data Analysis
Michelle Cheatham, Co-Director, Data Semantics Laboratory, Wright State University.

May 2Smart Cities and AI: A Critique of Techno-Optimism
Luis Pradanos-Garcia, M.U. Associate Professor, Spanish and Portuguese, and Daniela Inclezan, M. U. Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Software Engineering.

Coordinator

Don Hanson is a retired dentist with an interest in artificial intelligence.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: April 4–May 2; 1:00–2:15pm
Room 107, Boyd Hall

The Vietnam War—Five Decades Later: Stories of War Veterans

With the 50th anniversary of the Tet Offensive and the resurgence of interest in the Vietnam War, the intent of this course is to offer ILR members an opportunity to hear and discuss stories and experiences of five Vietnam veterans. Vietnam veterans think of the war every day, and this course will honor them and their stories.

April 4Confessions of a Clandestine USAF Fighter Pilot
Tom Burdin, Captain, U.S. Air Force, flew 168 combat missions with A-1 Skyraiders out of Udorn RTAFB in Thailand. He was involved in the rescue and recovery of 69 pilots and others from the jungles of Southeast Asia. Tom received 4 Distinguished Flying Crosses and 21 Air Medals during his tour of duty.

April 11Vietnamization 1970–1971
VThomas Fey, 1Lt. U.S. Army, was deployed to the Darlac Province in Vietnam in May 1970 and served in the II Corps as a member of a Mobile Advisory Team (MAT) working with Montagnard tribes in the Central Highlands.

April 18Vietnam: A Day In the Life of a USAF Fighter Pilot
Ron Schloemer, Colonel, U.S. Air Force (Ret.), served for 30 years as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Air Force. During the Vietnam conflict he flew 200 combat missions in F-4s over North Vietnam and Laos.

April 25Stories from the FishHook
Carl Becker, Sergeant, U.S. Army, served in III Corps in the 1st Cavalry from March 1969 to March 1970 north of Saigon near the Fishhook region in Cambodia.

May 2Over the Trail in the AC-119K Stinger
Ron Julian, Major, U.S. Air Force (Ret.), was an airborne gunner on AC-119K ‘Stinger’ gunships in 1969-1970. He flew 150 combat missions in South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia from four SEA bases.

AlternateVietnam’s Forgotten Battle: The Easter Offensive
Jerry Riesenberg, SSgt., U.S. Air Force, served at Nakhon Phanom RTAFB in Thailand during 1972 and was deployed during the Easter Offensive to a forward operating base at Bien Hoa in Vietnam. He was NCOIC of the weapons maintenance ground crew for AC-119K gunships.

Coordinator

Jerry Riesenberg is a Vietnam veteran who served in the Easter Offensive Battle during 1972. He worked as an analytical chemist and in information technology at Procter and Gamble for 35 years and has been involved with ILR for over 5 years teaching courses and programming its database.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: April 4–May 2; 2:45–4:00pm
Room 107, Boyd Hall


The Changing Male Image

How have views of masculinity changed since 1900? We will focus on American males, their history, their stories, and the changes and challenges from the model European patriarch to current American concepts of fatherhood and masculinity. Through a variety of media that include literature and essays by historians, biologists, sociologists, and psychologists, Web pages, advertisements, and video clips/music, we will examine the perception of the male image in the latter 20th century and early 21st.

Instructor

Ted Leahey, Adjunct Instructor of Communication Studies, Indiana University East, whose interests include preservation, visual arts and writing, and woodworking.

Dates and Location

3 Wednesdays: April 4–April 18; 2:45–4:00pm
Room 217, Boyd Hall


Tickling the Ivories: Piano Recital and Lecture Series

Miami University piano students will present a series of four classical piano recitals featuring works by Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Liszt, Debussy, Copland, and Schumann. Performers will include DJ Cleavinger, Hayden Dennison, Cloie Dobias, Adam Guadalupe, Andrew Higgins, Henry Hutchinson, Joseph Ivan, Nathan Rayens, Kang Ning Yong, Xiaotang Yuan, Cindy Wang, and Yan Wang. Sponsored by Oxford Community Arts Center.

Instructor

Siok Lian Tan, Associate Professor of Piano and Keyboard Area Coordinator.

Dates and Location

4 Wednesdays: March 28–April 18; 5:30–6:30pm
Ballroom, Oxford Community Arts Center

Thursday Classes

Five Continents of Folk Music

We live in a world that is increasingly connected, one in which it is easier than ever to hear music from cultures very different from ours. In celebration of the richness and diversity of this music, this course offers an overview of traditional music from five continents: Asia, Africa, Europe, South America, and North America. Each class meeting will include time for focused listening and discussion.

Class text: Optional textbook: World Music: A Global Journey by Terry E. Miller & Andrew Shahriari. 4th edition. Routledge, ISBN: 978-0-393-91828-1.

Instructor

David Palmer has taught music in Nevada, Michigan, Bolivia, Pennsylvania, New York, and North Carolina. He is active in southern Ohio as a church, jazz, and rock musician, and has released fourteen CDs of his compositions.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 10; 9:00–10:15am
NOTE: No class May 3
Leonard Theatre, Peabody Hall


Bread and Wine: An Italian Novel in Translation

We will read and discuss an English translation of the classic Italian novel Vino e pane by Ignazio Silone. It is the story of an anti-fascist exile who clandestinely returns to fascist Italy in an attempt to inspire the peasants of his native area to resist the dictatorship. One of the fascinating elements of the novel is the author’s harmonization of traditional Christian and socialist values.

Class text: Bread and Wine by Ignazio Silone, trans: Eric Mosbacher. Signet Classics, 2005. ISBN 0-451-52978-2. Available through Amazon.

Instructor

Peter Pedroni taught Italian language and literature at Miami University for 37 years and directed the Miami University Summer Language Institute in Italy for 36 years. He has published books and articles on Italian literature and has translated two Italian novels into English. He has also taught ILR Italian for Travelers several times.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 3; 9:00–10:15am
Room 130, Police Services Center


Introduction to I-Rest Yoga Nidra Meditation

This is a meditation based on ancient yogic teachings but made accessible for modern day life. It is designed to bring the healing benefits of yogic and meditative practices to a wide variety of people. I-Rest can be practiced by anyone, regardless of whether you are a lifelong meditator or have never tried meditation before. Please bring a yoga mat and blanket (or two).

Instructor

Suzanne Klatt, Director of Miami University’s Mindfulness and Contemplative Inquiry Center, is certified to teach multiple Mindfulness programs.

Dates and Location

4 Thursdays: April 5–April 26; 10:45am–noon
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons


Frank Lloyd Wright: Man, Myth, Master

This course will study a group of buildings and designs by Wright that represent the development of his career and his contribution to modern architecture. It will also study the constellation of complex personal and professional relationships that marked his life. Lectures will be illustrated by PowerPoint images and enhanced by discussion where possible.

Instructor

Robert Benson, Professor Emeritus of Architecture, was Chair of the Department of Architecture and Interior Design and Interim Dean of the College of Creative Arts.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 3; 10:45am–noon
Leonard Theatre, Peabody Hall


Extraterrestrials Have Landed—on Film

Let’s explore five films depicting first contact with alien beings: Close Encounters of the Third Kind; Starman; Contact; Arrival; and 2001: A Space Odyssey. Unlike the many movies which deal with invaders from space, these films ponder what a less violent meeting might entail. Class members will view the films on their own time, with class discussions devoted to exploring issues raised by or in them.

Instructor

Bill Hardesty taught British and American literature, including science fiction and fantasy, in Miami University’s English department.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 3; 1:00–2:15pm
Room 31, Peabody Hall


Poetry Workshop

Poetry Workshop is a non-critical supportive place for poets at every level to grow. It is especially safe for beginners. We will share our lines, ideas, scribbles, scraps, and other poetic attempts to discuss how to write a successful poem. Our goal is to keep each other writing! We will, as Emily Dickinson said, “Dwell in possibility.”

Instructor

Jackie Kalbli has been a reader and writer of poetry since a very young age. She recently retired after 38 years of teaching young children and is currently preparing a first collection of poetry.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 3; 1:00–2:15pm
Room 123, Police Services Center


Nature Walks in the Woods

Ahh, the joys of spring—especially after the long, gray, cold days of winter. Come explore with us in the Miami University Natural Areas that include over 1000 acres and 17 miles of trails. Each walk will last about 90 minutes, including stops along the way as we see emerging wildflowers, trees, and other delights. The earth trails may be slippery from rain; hiking boots are recommended. Expect to walk up to two miles on hilly terrain. For the first walk, meet in the Dewitt Log Homestead parking lot just east of the Miami stables on Route 73. Maps with directions to future walks will be distributed at the first walk. Weather cancellations will be announced via email by 1:00 p.m. on each walk day. Those without email should call the ILR office for cancellation information.

Instructor

Jim Reid, Field Manager, Miami University Natural Areas, along with other Naturalist leaders.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 3; 2:45–4:15pm
Location varies, as listed in the course description above.


Shakespeare in Action

Shakespeare left clues for his actors throughout his writing. Become an actor of Shakespeare’s day! Learn how to read those clues and turn them into action. Focusing on First Folio editions of The Winter’s Tale and Macbeth, we’ll use hands-on activities, demonstrations with live actors, and guest presenters to bring the text to life. Guest presenters include Patrick Flick, Artistic Director of Richmond Shakespeare Festival, and Saffron Henke, Assistant Professor, Theatre.

Class text: Any edition of The Winter’s Tale and Macbeth.

Instructor

JJulia Guichard is an Associate Professor and Chair of the Theatre Department. She is a professional vocal coach, specializing in speech and dialects.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 3; 2:45–4:00pm
Leonard Theatre, Peabody Hall


What’s That Calling in the Night? Frogs and Toads of the Oxford Area

Ever wonder what is making those primeval sounds you hear on spring evenings? This class will introduce you to the mating calls of a variety of native frogs and toads. We’ll practice by listening to recordings of the 15 species native to Ohio, although we are likely only to hear as many as eight species in the field. The field portion of the class is not strenuous. A flashlight or headlamp and a trained ear are the only requirements. Mosquitoes are unlikely to be a problem.

Instructors

Dick Munson is the retired Manager of The Conservatory on the Miami University Hamilton campus. He has over 40 years of horticultural experience and is an avid naturalist.

Brian Keane is a Professor of Biology whose research specialty is the natural history of prairie voles. He is a highly knowledgeable naturalist and an avid birder.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: April 5–May 3; 7:00–8:30pm
Room 100 (Paul Daniel classroom, Hefner Museum), Upham Hall, for first two weeks; location of remaining “field” weeks will be announced in class.

Friday Classes

Beginning Chess

“Chess, like love, is infectious at any age,” said Czech Grandmaster Salo Flohr. It can provide endless hours of entertainment and mental challenge. Chess is an easy game to learn and a hard game to master. It has been called “a sea in which a gnat may drink and an elephant may bathe.” Come in! The water’s fine! Sessions focus on (1) the rules and fundamentals of chess, (2) the Opening, (3) the Middlegame, (4) the Endgame, and (5) “what next” suggestions for the newly chess-addicted. Designed for beginners and novices; stronger players are welcome.

Instructor

Clyde Brown, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, has been a recreational chess player for more than five decades. He is a founding member of the Loosely Organized Chess Club of Oxford (LOCO).

Dates and Location

5 Fridays: April 6–May 4; 10:45am–noon
Room 123, Police Services Center


Ideas of Honor

Honor in the aristocratic sense elevates some persons above others and becomes pride, a passion destructive to society. What is honor in a democratic sense in which all persons are equal? Then honor is a gift from others, whether or not deserved, and we all need it to live well together. In a democracy how do we become honorable persons?

Instructor

Jack Sommer has taught philosophy at Miami University, Western College, and the ILR.

Dates and Location

5 Fridays: April 6–May 4; 1:00–2:15pm
Boardroom, Knolls of Oxford Commons


Our Laws and Law Enforcement in Oxford

Miami and Oxford create some unique challenges to law enforcement. We hope to address some of these issues with five different speakers.

April 6Policing in the 21st Century
Chief of Police John Jones is a familiar figure around Oxford. A lieutenant on the Oxford force, he was promoted to chief in March of 2016.

April 13First Amendment Bill of Rights for Students
Robin Parker is General Counsel for Miami University.

April 20Self Defense and What We Do Here
Sergeant Susan Tobergte has been with the Miami University Police Department for 12 years; she has been in law enforcement for 21 years.

April 27State & Federal Court Systems: How They Got There
Judge Matthew Crehan, retired Butler County Common Pleas Court Judge.

May 4Senior Driver Improvement Program for Older Adults
Stacey Marcum is with the Oxford AAA.

Coordinator

Barbara Eshbaugh is a longtime Curriculum Committee member.

Dates and Location

5 Fridays: April 6–May 4; 1:00–2:15pm
NOTE: May 4 ends at 3:00pm
Havighurst, Oxford Lane Library

Saturday Classes

The History of the Book

Attendees will have a hands-on approach to the history of the book from ancient times to the present. Materials range from 2500 BCE to 2017 CE. Included will be a discussion on the preservation of materials.

Instructors

William Modrow is Head of Walter Havighurst Special Collections and University Archives at Miami University

Ashley Jones is the Preservation Librarian of the Walter Havighurst Special Collections and University Archives.

Dates and Location

5 Saturdays: April 7–May 5; 10:45am–noon
Room 320, King Library

ILR events/classes involving walking/hiking/exercise may be strenuous for some. Please use discretion when registering.