Oxford Courses

Our Spring 2018 classes and events will be available soon. In the meantime, you can review classes and events that were offered Fall 2017.

Truth and Objectivity

Truth, truthiness, fake news. Philosophical theories of truth attempt to analyze what makes beliefs “true” and what it means for them to be true. Theories of objectivity try to explain how to discover whether one’s beliefs are true or false. Learning about two opposing theories of truth and objectivity—absolute truth and the “view from nowhere,” and relative truth and the “view from somewhere”—can help us understand some of the debates and controversies of today’s political scene.

Instructor

William McKenna, Professor of Philosophy, specializes in epistemology.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 2–October 30
8:45–10:00 a.m.
Room 123, Police Services Center

When the Romans Became Italians: Or Did They?

A history professor of one of the instructors of this course once remarked that one of the great tragedies of history occurred when “the Romans became Italians.” The instructors will use a variety of primary sources including material culture, popular culture, the creative arts, political life, and literature to consider when or whether the Romans did become Italians, looking at the changes that occurred and the continuities which remained as the world of ancient Rome transformed and evolved through the centuries into what came to be perceived as Italian culture.
Supplies/Books: A packet of short readings will be available at the Oxford Copy Shop. Students should read the assignments for the first week before attending the first class meeting.

Instructors

Judith de Luce, Professor Emerita of Classics, taught all aspects of Roman culture from language and literature to law, gender, politics, and material culture. Sante Matteo, Professor Emeritus of Italian, taught Italian language, literature, cinema, including a course called “Italy, Matrix of Civilization,” an exploration of how significant aspects of what is termed Western Civilization were fashioned and developed.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 2–October 30
8:45–10:00 a.m.
Boardroom, Knolls of Oxford Commons

Classical Music in the First Half of the Twentieth Century

The first half of the twentieth century was a time of great change and innovation in classical music. While the experiments of modernism turned some off, many have found much to like in this repertoire. Using a textbook, in-class listening, and live illustrations the course encourages participants to understand the aesthetic and historical developments that gave rise to twentieth century classical music.

Class text: Music in the 20th Century: From Debussy through Stravinsky by William W. Austin. W. W. Norton & Company; 1st edition (January 1, 1980).

Instructor

David Palmer is a music performer, composer, and teacher. For 13 years, he taught a variety of music courses for Pfeiffer University in North Carolina.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 2– November 6
10:30 – 11:45 a.m.
NOTE: NO CLASS ON 10/16
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons

Midday Lecture Series

Each Monday the Midday Lecture Series presents a speaker who will discuss a topic of interest and importance. Plan to bring a brown bag lunch and enjoy an ILR tradition.

October 2Recent Developments in Health Care and Long-term Care: What Seniors Should KnowJohn Bowblis, Associate Professor of Economics and Research Fellow with the Scripps Gerontology Center
October 9Is American Anti-Trust Still Relevant?James Brock, Moeckel Professor of Economics
October 16Spooky Archaeology: Myth and the Science of the PastJeb Card, Visiting Assistant Professor and Assistant for Special Projects, Department of Anthropology
October 23Physiological Support of the U-2/SR-71 High Altitude Reconnaissance AircraftSusan Richardson, Aerospace Physiologist, U.S. Air Force, Retired
October 30The Evolution of the EMU in OhioSharon Edwards, Naturalist for the non-profit Butler County-based Environmental Mobile Unit 

Coordinator

Betty Rogers, Professor Emerita of Spanish, is past Chair of ILR.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 2–October 30
12:15–1:30 p.m.
Auditorium, M.U. Art Museum

The United States and World War I

One hundred years ago—on April 6, 1917—the United States joined its allies Great Britain, France, and Russia and formally entered World War I. Four members of the Department of History and the curator of exhibitions for the University Art Museum will discuss the broad subject of the United States and World War I from their disciplinary and research perspectives.

October 2The Yanks are Coming: U.S. Entry into World  War IAmanda McVety, Associate Professor of History
October 91917, the Great War, and the Russian RevolutionStephen Norris, Professor of History and Interim Director, Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies
October 16From Empire to Entropy: War and Upheaval in Germany, 1917–1923Erik Jensen, Associate Professor of History
October 23The Great War and the American HomefrontAllan Winkler, Distinguished Professor of History Emeritus
October 30Galvanizing America: Propaganda and the Arts in the Great WarJason Shaiman, Curator of Exhibitions, Miami University Art Museum

Coordinator

William J. Gracie, Jr., Professor Emeritus of English and former Dean of the School of Interdisciplinary Studies, is chair of the ILR Curriculum Committee.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 2–October 30
2:15–3:30 p.m.
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons

Religion in Contemporary America

Religion has frequently played a major role in the news in recent years, and this course will try to put this in context. Topics will include the First Amendment and religious liberty; Evangelical Protestantism and the Religious Right; the crisis of authority in the Catholic Church; Islam and immigration and religious pluralism.

Books/Supplies (Optional): Peter W. Williams, America’s Religions (4th ed.) University of Illinois Press, 2015.

Instructor

Peter Williams is University Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Comparative Religion and American Studies at Miami. His survey, America’s Religions, is now in its fourth edition.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 2–October 30
4:00–5:15 p.m.
Location: Room 407, Peabody Hall

Red Sky Over the Atlantic: Gathering Storm or New Dawn?

In recent years, economic and technological change, mass migration, military and diplomatic confrontation, and the rise of a new nationalism have interacted to buffet both the European Union and the Atlantic Alliance with NATO at its core. This course examines the forces at work among the nations of the North Atlantic and asks if these challenges are a “red sky warning” of an impending storm or if they point to new and more effective forms of joint action.

Instructor

Warren Mason, Professor Emeritus of Political Science, was Director of the Miami University European Center-Luxembourg.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3–October 31
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Room 217, Boyd Hall

Copy Fee: $5, payable with registration

Topics of Current Interest

Current topics of discussion will be selected from various segments of our lives. The class facilitators will present factual point/counterpoint data to kick off lively, interactive discussions. They will select a topic for the first session; then the class will identify what topics they want to discuss in subsequent sessions. The goal is an increase in understanding of current topics of controversy and debate.

Instructors

Rich Daniels is a retired CEO of McCullough-Hyde Hospital in Oxford. Bill McKnight retired from General Electric, Aircraft Engines, as a Senior Technologist.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3–October 31
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Room 31, Peabody Hall

A Congress That Serves the People

Congress has had a very high disapproval rating for almost a decade, no matter which party has been in the majority. They have raised the deficit every year since 2000 and excluded themselves from laws they pass for us. Many people want to see Congress work together on the nation’s problems but feel Congress puts party, personal, or donor interests first. Have you had enough of “politics as usual”? Are you ready to see big changes made in our national government processes? Are you willing to be part of the “Change Generation”?

Instructor

Bob Viney, a former US Nuclear Submarine officer and Procter and Gamble executive, is an Adjunct Professor in Organizational Leadership at the University of Cincinnati.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3–November 7
10:45 a.m.–noon
NOTE: NO CLASS 10/10
Room 123, Police Services Center

The Constitution of the United States: Origins and Evolution

Our common understanding of US history tends to leap from Jamestown to Plymouth Rock to the Declaration of Independence and Constitution, ignoring the interstices. Let’s fill in the gaps to see what forces were operating on the delegates to the Constitutional Convention and then unpack the meaning of the original words in both historical and changing political contexts. We will touch on the landmark decisions between the ratification of the Constitution and the Warren Court and then examine more closely a few of the decisions that have proved most transformative.

Books/Supplies: A pocket Constitution (and Declaration) will be provided by the instructor.

Instructor

Susan Kay, Professor Emerita of Political Science, taught political science courses for 42 years.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3–October 31
10:45 a.m.–noon
Game Room, Knolls of Oxford Commons

Hollywood Leading Men of the 1930s and 1940s

As a continuation of last semester’s course on leading ladies, a variety of presenters will explore the lives and accomplishments (on and off screen) of six leading men who had a significant impact on the movie-going experience of audiences in the 1930s and ‘40s.

October 3—Errol FlynnRichard Brunner, a lifelong movie fan with a special interest in the Academy Awards, taught ILR’s “Sundown Cinema” for 20 semesters.
October 10David NivenTina Brunner shares her husband’s love of movies, but also has a passion for Hollywood restaurants and the Golden Age of Hollywood nightlife.
October 17Spencer TracyJohn Barnhart is a retired Miami Police Detective and longtime cinema aficionado and lover of jazz.
October 24Jimmy StewartMichele Darone is a still-working medical secretary who has loved old movies since she was 12.
October 31Cary GrantAnna Somboretz is a lover of all things vintage. Her fascination with classic films began as an adolescent insomniac watching late night TV. Chris Hensey is her wineaux brother and living costume mannequin.

Coordinator

Richard Brunner, a lifelong movie fan with a special interest in the Academy Awards, taught ILR’s “Sundown Cinema” for 20 semesters.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3–October 31
1:00–2:15 p.m.
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons

Womanly Pursuits: Social History of Women in Science

Women have been active in astronomy, physics, geography, microscopy, geology, biology, and many more disciplines for hundreds of years. Discover for yourself the range and depth of women’s participation in the sciences. The history is not a story of conditions simply getting better and better for women since the 17th century. Changing social conditions in Europe and America have led to increased acceptance of women as workers and leaders in science and sometimes to losses in these roles. Are female biology and psychology compatible with science? Different times and places have given distinct answers to this question.

Instructor

Muriel Blaisdell, Professor Emerita of Interdisciplinary Studies and History, has taught courses on the history of science, on science and religion, and on the history of exploration and discovery.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3–October 31
1:00–2:15 p.m.
Havighurst Room, Oxford Lane Library

A Philosophical Account of Posthumanism

Humanity, in its biological, psychological, and socio-historical aspects, may be nearing an endpoint. Questions: what are our prospects as a species for a positive transformation to something other than human? What philosophical questions arise in the contemplation of such transformation? Let’s investigate these questions.

Instructor:

Asher Seidel, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, has published two monographs on the topic: Inhuman Thoughts and Immortal Passage.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3 – October 31
2:45 – 4:00 p.m.
Room 31, Peabody Hall

More Music: Broadway, Opera and Beyond

The course will include Pamela Myers, a veteran of Broadway and television, who opened as Marta in Stephen Sondheim’s Company on Broadway after graduating from the College Conservatory of Music of the University of Cincinnati, plus some of your favorite presenters.


October 3Gershwin, Cole Porter, Jerome Kern, Duke Ellington, and Count Basie – Oxford’s own John Bercaw will entertain us with his knowledge and the music of these greats.
October 10Life in the Bright LightsPamela Myers, star of Broadway and TV, will bring us her magnificent voice and experiences in the entertainment world.
October 17A Trip Through Tin Pan Alley: Piano Stylings of Irving Berlin, Richard Rodgers, Vincent Youmans, Ray Henderson, Harry Warren and OthersRandy Runyon, local pianist and former French professor, loves to play from “The Great American Songbook.”
October 24There’s a Lot to Love About OperaAnne MorrisHooke, opera enthusiast and bel canto fanatic, will share the tragic story and glorious music of Vincenzo Bellini’s Norma.
October 31Music of Stage and Film 1926-1965Jerry Stanley will entertain us with live performances and recordings from four decades of Broadway and films.

Coordinator

Margie Maltbie has been interested in music all her life.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3–October 31
2:45–4:00 p.m.
Ballroom, Oxford Community Arts Center
This course is proudly sponsored by the Oxford Community Arts Center.  We thank them for their gracious support.

A Wine Tour of Australia

Over the course of five weeks, the wines of Australia, Barossa, Victoria, South Australia, and other regional wines will be sampled while their unique aspects are presented and discussed in an informal atmosphere. One session will focus on wine appreciation and a structured, step-by-step analysis of wine. Come prepared with three wine glasses and a sense of oenoadventure.

Instructor

Chris Hensey has offered ILR wine-tasting courses for more than a decade, nearly as long as he operated his Oxford wine shop. He has passed the Introductory Exam for the Court of Master Sommeliers and serves as a judge for the Cincinnati International Wine Festival.

Dates and Location

5 Tuesdays: October 3—October 31
4:30—5:45 p.m.
LaRosa’s, Oxford

Plan a Comfortable Financial Future

Take control of your financial affairs. Learn about managing your finances in retirement. Address real-life concerns with tools that will last a lifetime during any economic time. This knowledge will help you become more confident in making intelligent decisions to pursue your overall goals and dreams and improve your financial future. Full-color graphics to explain financial concepts will be used. The moderator will provide a 164-page interactive workbook packed with colorful charts, graphs, and explanations that follows the entire course. This valuable take-home resource will help participants apply principles learned in class to their personal financial situations.

Instructor

Gary Hollander, CFP, has been providing financial classes and workshops for over 41 years and has been recently awarded “FIVE STAR Best in Client Satisfaction Wealth Manager” by Cincinnati Magazine. Gary has been the President of Hollander & Associates LLC since 1976.

Dates and Location

6 Wednesdays: October 4–November 8
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Room 130, Police Services Center

Zika and Other Emerging Viral Diseases

Discussion of several emerging infectious diseases humans currently face, including how the RNA viruses that cause them evolve and spread. Basic aspects of virus biology, epidemiology (cause and spread of disease), and pathology of selected viral diseases will be considered. No special prior training in biology is required.

Instructor

John Stevenson, Professor Emeritus of Microbiology, retired in 2015 after 41 years of teaching and research focused on immunology and infectious diseases.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: October 4–November 1
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Room 123, Police Services Center

Healthy Weight Management

Have you struggled with healthy weight management? This course will help you determine a healthy weight and learn a variety of strategies to achieve and maintain it. Recognizing healthy food and determining appropriate amounts in the supermarket, home, and restaurants, as well as recipe modification will be addressed. Healthy physical activity levels will also be covered. Be prepared for a permanent diet and lifestyle change to achieve success.

Instructor

Carol Michael is a Professor Emerita in the Dietetics and Nutrition Program.

Dates and Location

4 Wednesdays: October 4–October 25
10:45 a.m.–noon
Room 123, Police Services Center

The Poetry of the Late Local Poet James Reiss

For many years a popular and successful teacher of poetry in Miami’s English Department, Mr. Reiss’s work was favorably reviewed by The New York Times Book Review, the New Yorker, and similar prestigious journals. At one point, Jim bought a jalopy to convey himself to and from the Cincinnati airport so he could frequently gather fresh ideas from his hometown of New York City to enliven his poetry and to better inspire his Miami students

Class text fee: $15, payable at first class for Riff on Six, New and Selected Poems (2003). The book is sold out, but copies are available from the instructor.

Instructor

Frank Jordan, Professor Emeritus of English, has taught primarily the works of contemporary poets for ILR.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: October 4–November 1
10:45 a.m.–noon
Location: Room 130, Police Services Center

What’s Trending in The Arts?

Five experts, five slants on five arts! What’s trending in Art? Architecture? Interactive Media? Music? Theatre? Each week will feature a speaker focusing on aspects of current developments in one of these areas.


October 4—Julia Guichard, Miami University Theatre
October 11Bob Benson, Professor Emeritus of Architecture
October 18Glenn Platt, Professor of Marketing and Interactive Media and Director, Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies.
October 25Jeremy Long, Associate Professor of Music  (saxophone and jazz studies)
November 1Dennis Cheatham, Assistant Professor of Art

Coordinator

Michael Griffith is a Professor Emeritus of Theatre.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: October 4–November 1
12:30–1:45 p.m.
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons

Rhythms of Thinking

How do we find truth by thinking? Science and religion claim truth by following their methods, such as scientific experiment or divine revelation. Thinking, as revealed in writing, also has its methods, each with a different rhythm. There are four methods in our history of thinking, distinguished by their steps: the one-step logistic; the two-step operational; the three-step dialectical; and the four-step problematic. All these methods can protect us from false beliefs or misleading facts, but we probably prefer one method over others when we must think.

Instructor

Jack Sommer has taught philosophy at Miami, Western College, and ILR.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: October 4–November 1
1:00–2:15 p.m.
Room 407, Peabody Hall

Mormonism: Understanding an American Religious Minority

Although they are often regarded as marginal or obscure, Mormons are one of the United States’ more significant religious minorities, numerically and politically speaking. As we explore the experiences of Mormons, we’ll gain insight into issues that affect many religious groups in this country. How have Mormons worked out their relationship to America’s Christian majority? How have they negotiated church-state conflicts? Where do Mormons stand in ongoing cultural debates about gender and sexuality? How do Mormons’ religious practices give their lives a distinctive shape? How do Mormons create and regulate sacred spaces?

Class text: David J. Howlett and John-Charles Duffy, Mormonism: The Basics (Routledge, 2017), paperback, 978-1-138-02048-1

Instructor

John-Charles Duffy has been a Lecturer in the Department of Comparative Religion since 2011 and teaches courses on religion in American history and culture. He is coauthor of Mormonism: The Basics.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: October 4–November 1
2:45–4:00 p.m.
Room 407, Peabody Hall

Rock & Roll Bands of Oxford: the 60’s

Terry Williamson, road manager of the band Lemon Pipers (Green Tambourine), will share the history/stories of this band and others who originated in Oxford. Members of other bands, including Bill Bartlett and John Kogge, will join Terry some weeks. Who were the people of Oxford in the music scene? What was it like to be on the road with a nationally known band? Bring your questions, pictures, and stories.

Instructors

Terry Williamson, road manager of the band Lemon Pipers (Green Tambourine), and Kathy McMahon Klosterman, Professor Emerita of Educational Psychology.

Dates and Locations

5 Wednesdays: October 4–November 1
2:45–4:00 p.m.
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons

D-Day and the Battle for Normandy

The course will discuss the planning and political maneuvering leading to the final invasion plan. In addition, the course will discuss in detail the actions of Allied and German forces on the day of the invasion, June 6, 1944, as well as the subsequent battles for Normandy and onward to the liberation of Paris in August. Finally, we’ll conclude with some thoughts on visiting Normandy today.

Instructor

Patrick Sidley has been interested in military history most of his adult life. Prior to visiting Normandy a few years ago, he studied the invasion in some depth and will share his knowledge.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 5–November 2
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Room 217, Boyd Hall

Infusion: Mindfulness & Self-Compassion for Busy People

Join us for a break from the hustle and bustle of a busy and chaotic world. This class is for people who are interested in inquiring deeply into their own habits of mind and body. We will infuse self-compassion, mindfulness, and other contemplative practices into our lives and develop the skills to extend these practices outside the classroom.

Instructor

Suzanne Klatt, Director of Miami University’s Mindfulness & Contemplative Inquiry Center, is certified to teach multiple Mindfulness programs.

Dates and Location

4 Thursdays: October 12–November 2
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Yoga Room, Chestnut Field House

Antisemitism: The Longest Hatred

The title for this course comes from a film produced by the United States Holocaust Museum that focuses on the 2000-year-old history of antisemitism (prejudice against or hatred of Jews). As we explore that history, we will examine the variety of social, political, cultural, and religious factors that have shaped antisemitic views during that period, culminating in the Holocaust. The study of antisemitic views and attitudes will provide us with greater understanding of how prejudice, stereotyping, and scapegoating —behaviors which create an in-group and an out-group and build up one at the expense of the other—has appeal to individuals and groups and can be exploited for social and political purposes. The class will focus on not only the past, but also the present; we will examine the continued forms that antisemitism and religious/ ethnic prejudice take and discuss ways of responding.

Instructor

Alan deCourcy, Associate Professor of Religious and Pastoral Studies, Mount St. Joseph University, is the former Vice President for Academic Affairs at Mount St. Joseph.

Dates and Locations

5 Thursdays: October 5–November 2
10:45 a.m.–noon
Leonard Theatre, Peabody Hall

Shakespeare: Comedy, History, and Tragedy

We will undertake a close reading of four of Shakespeare’s plays: Henry IV, Part One; Much Ado About Nothing; Hamlet; and Macbeth. The format of the course will encourage class participation. Any text of the plays is acceptable; for the first class please read Henry IV, Part One.

Instructor

Robert Johnson, Professor Emeritus of English and former Dean of the Graduate School, taught at Miami for 46 years, including courses on Shakespeare.

Dates and Locations

5 Thursdays: October 5–November 2
10:45 a.m.–noon
Room 130, Police Services Center

Embracing Immigration: A Call to Action

The course will address issues related to immigration in the context of current political and economic challenges and opportunities and their impact in the schools. Participants will hear the voices of immigrant families and their experiences. Participants will develop civic engagement strategies for full inclusion of immigrant families into the community.

Guest Lecturers

  • Linda Bucher, English as a Second Language Coordinator, Talawanda School District
  • Elias Tzoc, Digital Scholarship Librarian and at large board member, Association of Latino Faculty and Staff (ALFAS)
  • Silvia Rothschild, Latino Community Outreach Coordinator, Center For American and World Cultures
  • Jacqueline Rioja Velarde, Associate Director, Center for American and World Cultures, and former president, Association of Latino Faculty and Staff (ALFAS)

Coordinators

Kathy McMahon Klosterman and Jacqueline Rioja Velarde have experience designing and implementing curricular and co-curricular programs that focus on social justice.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 5–November 2
1:00–2:15 p.m.
Room 228, Boyd Hall

More Making Marks on Paper

In this course, we will continue to work with the Gelli plate, acrylic paints, stencils, and mark making tools. We will add rubber stamps, permanent ink pads, gesso, and matte medium. The emphasis will be on using these tools to create an art journal. Each student will receive a small journal in which to practice. All skill levels are welcome.

Supplies needed: craft apron or paint shirt

Instructor

Judy Brewer is a retired teacher from Eaton City Schools and is a member of Cincinnati Ink, a rubber stamp group, and Cincinnati Book Club, a book binding group.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 5–November 2
1:00–2:15 p.m. 
Classroom, M.U. Art Museum

Recreating the Science Fiction Film: Lucas, Scott, Spielberg

In five years (1977-1982), three directors changed the nature of science fiction film with imaginative and technologically advanced creations: Star Wars, Alien, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, Blade Runner, and ET: The Extra-Terrestrial. Students will watch the films on their own. Class discussion will deal with how these films broke new ground in subject matter and form, and how these films radically changed science fiction cinema, its audience, and its public image.

Instructor

Bill Hardesty taught literature, including science fiction, at Miami for a number of years.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 5–November 2
2:45–4:00 p.m.
Room 228, Boyd Hall

Walking in the Fall through the Natural Areas

The wonders of fall are seen all around us in the Natural Areas. Come walk and see some of these beautiful trails and be amazed by their beauty, all so close to home. See beautiful woods, streams, birds, and much more. Hikes last about 1-1/2 hours. Dress for the season. The earth trails may be slippery from rain; hiking boots are recommended. Expect to hike up to two miles on hilly terrain. For the first hike, meet in the Dewitt Log Homestead parking lot just east of the Miami horse stables on Route 73.

Maps with directions to future hikes will be distributed at the first hike. Weather cancellations will be announced via email by 1:00 p.m. on each hike day. Those without email should call the ILR office for cancellation information.

Instructors

Jim Reid is Field Manager for Miami’s Natural Areas. Mike Wright is a Naturalist, Department of Biology.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 5–November 2
2:45–4:15 p.m.
Location varies as listed in the course description.

Sundown Cinema: Between Peace and War

War, we’re told, brings out the worst and the best in humanity. If that’s true, what does peace bring out in people: the not-so-bad and not-so-good? We will watch and discuss movies that deal with times of war, times of peace, and with people’s attempts to navigate between the two states and the different demands they make on us.

October 5—Fort Bliss (2014), Claudia Myers. After returning home from an extended tour in Afghanistan, a decorated U.S. Army medic and single mother (Michelle Monaghan) struggles to rebuild her relationship with her young son.
October 12Paths of Glory (1956), Stanley Kubrick. In World War I, a general accuses soldiers of cowardice, and their commanding officer (Kirk Douglas) must defend them.
October 19King of Hearts (French, 1966), Philippe de Broca. Near the end of WWI, a Scottish soldier (Alan Bates) is assigned to defuse a bomb left by German soldiers in a French town where the only inhabitants left are escapees from an insane asylum.
October 26Dr. Strangelove, or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), Stanley Kubrick. After an insane general (Sterling Hayden) launches a nuclear strike, politicians and military leaders (Peter Sellers, George C. Scott, Keenan Wynn, et al) gather in a war room to try to prevent a nuclear holocaust.
November 2Wag the Dog (1997), Barry Levinson. In an attempt to cover up a presidential sex scandal shortly before an election, a spin-doctor (Robert DeNiro) and a Hollywood producer (Dustin Hoffman) join forces to fabricate a war.

Coordinator

Sante Matteo, Professor Emeritus of Italian, taught Italian language, literature, culture, and film studies at Miami.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 5 – November 2
6:30– 9:00 p.m.
Room 322, McGuffey Hall

An Eye-Opening Look at Coffee

You don’t have to drink coffee to take this class! Coffee is intimately connected to cultural history, current issues in agriculture, climate change, social justice, globalism, ecotourism, and health. Coffee has been a vital ingredient in social and political life. It now appears to be a kind of wonder drug seriously—especially as people age. Where does coffee come from, what must be done to this tropical product to make it into beverages? How has coffee once again become a great cultural symbol here and abroad? Who makes money on coffee, and what is the situation of coffee farmers today?  We will look at coffee from the ground up and will taste various coffees in class. A trip to Oxford Coffee Co. to discuss roasting and its results will be part of the course. We will examine the social and economic life of coffee from its early days in Africa and the Middle East through the first English coffeehouses and, finally, to coffee at the cutting edge of shop design and sophistication today. In January, there will be an optional trip (at a reasonable cost) to see where and how coffee is grown and to meet with the farmers in Costa Rica. See page 7 of ILR bulletin for details.

Supply fee: $7, payable with registration

Instructor

Robert Thurston, Professor Emeritus of History, has published articles on coffee in trade magazines and is senior editor and contributor to Coffee: A Comprehensive Guide to the Bean, the Beverage, and the Industry. He has been a coffee roaster and retailer for 4-1/2 years.

Dates and Location

5 Fridays: October 6–November 3
9:00–10:15 a.m.
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons

An Exploration of Chocolate

From its origins in Mexico to becoming one of the world’s most important cash crops today, chocolate is one of the most fascinating affordable luxuries available. This five-part series will include tips on chocolate connoisseurship, how climate change affects the future of chocolate, ethical chocolate consumption, and, of course, many opportunities to try chocolates from different regions. Taste for yourself the floral brightness of a Dominican criollo, the gentle earthiness of a Ghanaian forastero, or the fruity acid burst of a Madagascar trinitario, while discovering the role chocolate has played in human activities for the last 4000 years.

Supplies/Books: Notebooks (any size/type) and pen
Supply fee: $20, payable with registration

Instructor

KT Lowe is Coordinator of Library Instruction and Service Learning, Indiana University East. She has been a chocolate aficionado for many years and has shared her knowledge through workshops at schools and libraries.

Dates and Location

5 Fridays: October 6–November 3
10:45 a.m.–noon 
Auditorium, Knolls of Oxford Commons

Yoga Fundamentals

The practice of yoga helps increase flexibility, mobility, circulation, and mind-body coordination. Some positions are done standing, seated, or on the floor. Adaptations are given as needed so participants can be relaxed and can focus on their breathing. Each class will end with either guided or silent relaxation. Please bring a yoga “sticky” mat to class.

Instructor

Kathy Hunter has taught yoga professionally since 1971 at various locations, including the University of Cincinnati, Miami University, in Colorado, and abroad. She is accredited through Yoga Alliance.

Dates and Location

6 Fridays: October 6–November 10
10:45 a.m.–noon
Yoga Room, Chestnut Field House

The World Around Us: Nature Revisited

Explore a sampling of nature’s creatures, features, and wonders through the eyes of four experts in their fields. The fifth week will include the viewing of a beautiful film.

October 6Campus Beauty: Planting to Attract ButterfliesDan Garber is a horticulturist at Miami University.
October 13Not Just Another Rock: Exploring the Karl E. Limper Geology MuseumKendall Hauer is the Director of the Karl E. Limper Geology Museum.
October 20Insects Rule: Honeybees and Leafcutter AntsRandy Morgan is Emeritus Curator of the Cincinnati Zoo’s Insectarium.
October 27Long Distance Commuting: Birds in the Fast LaneDave Russell teaches ornithology and methods in field ornithology at Miami University.
November 3Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife, a film by Doug Tallamay, University of Delaware Department of Entomology.

Coordinator

Barbara Eshbaugh has a lifelong love and appreciation for the natural world.

Dates and Location

5 Fridays: October 6–November 3
1:00 – 2:15 p.m.
Havighurst Room, Oxford Lane Library

Hobbies R Us

The hobbies of our friends and colleagues may surprise us as much as please us—once, that is, we know what those hobbies are. This course will go behind the scenes as Oxford friends, neighbors, and colleagues discuss hobbies that few of us, if any, knew they have pursued for many years. Choose one or all of the following workshops/demos/lectures and prepare to be dazzled.


October 6—Woodworking in Don’s ShopDon Byrkett has been a woodworking hobbyist for 10 years. This session includes brief demonstrations of various woodworking topics, including hand tools, furniture design, joinery, veneering, carving, turning, and finishing. Location/time: 7221 Dunham Road, Oxford; 2:45 – 4:00 p.m. (or later).
October 13Look to the Stars: Backyard Astronomy for the BeginnerJerry Riesenberg has been an amateur astronomer for more than 40 years. Location/time: Room 407, Peabody Hall; 2:45 – 4:00 p.m. (or later).
October 20Hands-on Stained Glass – Bill King has been a stained glass enthusiast/hobbyist for more years than he can count. Location/time: Oxford Seniors, 922 Tollgate Dr., Oxford; 1:30 – 4:00 p.m. Supply fee: $10, payable at Oxford Seniors on class day.
October 27 – Cooking in Cy’s KitchenCyrus Young, Professor Emeritus of Geography and Certified Personal Chef for six years. Location/time: Cy’s kitchen, 13 Carrie Circle, Oxford; 2:45 – 5:00 p.m.
Supply fee: $15, payable with registration.
November 3iPhoneography: Hands-on Digital Photography Enhancement on Your iPhoneFran Ucci is a Miami University Visiting Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Software Engineering and has been a photography enthusiast/hobbyist for 20 years. Location/ time: Room 407, Peabody Hall; 2:45 – 4:00 p.m. (or later).

Coordinator

Mary Daniels is an ILR and community volunteer.

Dates and Location

5 Fridays: October 6–November 3
Start time varies, as noted in each description.
Location varies, as noted in each description.
Fee varies, as noted in each description.

ILR events/classes involving walking/hiking/exercise may be strenuous for some. Please use discretion when registering.