Workshops

Faculty sit at tables participating in a workshop

 



COVID-19 Precautions

IMPORTANT NOTE

Because of current COVID-19 precautionary measures on campus, some of our workshops are being postponed. Others will be delivered online via a WebEx presentation. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis. Stay tuned for updates via email, our Twitter (@HCWEMiami), and/or this website. 



Our workshops can help you better use writing in your courses to teach content and disciplinary values. Some of our workshops follow a traditional format of brief presentations with hands-on activities, while others follow a roundtable format on a particular topic with your peers leading the discussion.

All of our workshops are relaxed and provide ample opportunity to ask questions and share ideas with HWAC staff and cross-disciplinary colleagues.

All workshops include a light lunch and are held in King 133 unless noted.


Spring 2020 Workshops

Reimagining the Work of Writing Through Tools and Technologies

This exclusive workshop will be facilitated by the Spring 2020 HCWE Writing Scholar in Residence Tim Lockridge and will introduce you to a number of technologies and strategies for developing ideas. Topics introduced may include tools for notetaking, mindmapping, outlining, and planning writing tasks across periods of time. Participants will document their existing writing practices and imagine how new technologies might help them approach writing tasks in different ways. No familiarity with technology required.

  • Tuesday, January 21, 2020, 1:00PM–2:30PM, King 320

Register


Working with Graduate Student Writers Series

When students advance from undergraduate to graduate programs, they experience a shift in the kinds of writing they encounter as well as in expectations for their writing. In this workshop series, we invite graduate faculty to explore and expand the ways they support graduate student writers. Topics in this workshop series might include providing feedback, explaining requirements of assigned genres, and teaching disciplinary writing conventions. Participants are encouraged to attend all three parts of the series, although this is not required. Lunch provided.

Monday Workshop Series

Part 1: What Graduate Students Need 
  • Monday, February 17, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133
Part 2: Faculty Perspectives and Strategies
  • Monday, March 2, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133
Part 3: Toward Enactment and Sustainability
  • Monday, April 6, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133

Thursday Workshop Series

Part 1: What Graduate Students Need 
  • Thursday, February 20, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133
Part 2: Faculty Perspectives and Strategies
  • Thursday, March 5, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133
Part 3: Toward Enactment and Sustainability
  • Thursday, April 9, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133

Register


Celebrating Faculty Writers Series

Guest faculty will discuss their experiences with writing, research, and publication. Attendees will then engage in an open conversation about how to get their own writing done and how to help students write effectively. Participants are welcome to attend one or all three of the lunches. Lunch provided.

Monday, February 24, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133

Panel of Book Series Editors: How the Process Works and How to Submit a Book Proposal Successfully

In this interactive lunch three faculty members who edit book series with university presses will share their insights on how the process of submitting a book proposal works. They will discuss the process of submitting a proposal, how reviews and contracts work, and provide advice on how to submit a successful book proposal.

POSTPONED: Thursday, March 12, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133

Editing Books and Special Journal Issues

Panelists will describe the process of editing collections and special journal issues and provide advice for submitting to such publications.

Monday, April 13, 11:40AM–1:00PM, King 133

Panel of Journal Editors: How the Process Works and How to Submit a Journal Article Successfully

In this interactive lunch, faculty members who edit journals from across a range of disciplines will share their insights on how the process of journal publication works. They will discuss the process of submitting an article for peer review, how reviewer feedback is used, how the revision process works, and provide advice on how to successfully submit journal articles for publication.

  • Joseph Johnson, Associate Editor, Decision and Judgment and Decision Making
  • Neil Danielson, Editor, Journal of Chromatographic Science
  • Carolyn Hardin, Editor, Journal of Cultural Economy
  • Andrew Offenburger, Founding Editor, Safundi: The Journal of South African and American Studies

Register