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Undergraduates

As a Miami student, the University has high expectations for you and your future. Because of this, we want you to understand ways in which you can maintain the high standards we have set.

1. What is academic dishonesty?

2. What is the procedure for dealing with academic dishonesty?

3. What are the penalties for academic dishonesty?

4. Can I appeal if I am found responsible for an act of academic dishonesty?


1. What is academic dishonesty?

Academic dishonesty is defined as any activity that compromises the academic integrity of the institution or subverts the educational process. Examples of academic dishonesty include, but are not limited to:

1.5.B.1    Academic dishonesty is defined as engaging or attempting to engage in any activity that compromises the academic integrity of the institution or subverts the educational process, including as a means to complete or assist in the completion of an academic assignment.

An academic assignment is defined as the submission or presentation of any student work for evaluation, grade, or academic credit. This includes, but is not limited to, assignments in courses, proficiency waiver exams, and portfolios of research submitted to earn academic credit. This definition applies to work submitted face-to-face or through on-line or electronic means and work submitted for face-to-face, hybrid, and on-line courses affiliated with any of Miami University’s campuses and divisions.

Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, the following acts.

1.5.B.2      Acts of academic dishonesty

  1. Cheating: using or attempting to use or possessing any aid, information, resources, or means in the completion of an academic assignment that are not explicitly permitted by the instructor or providing such assistance to another student.

         Examples of cheating include, but are not limited to:

  • Possessing, referring to, or using in any way unauthorized textbooks, notes, study aids, crib/cheat sheets, or other information during an academic assignment, in paper, electronic, or other format;
  • Possessing, referring to, or using in any way unauthorized electronic devices or other materials during an academic assignment;
  • Looking at or using information from another student’s work during an academic assignment;
  • Receiving assistance from another individual in any academic assignment when not explicitly permitted by the instructor;
  • Utilizing or soliciting another person to complete any portion of an academic assignment in place of oneself or submitting the work of another person as one’s own;
  • Submitting the identical or substantially the same assignment to fulfill the requirements for two or more courses without approval of the instructors involved or submitting the identical or substantially the same assignment from a previously completed course to fulfill the requirements for another course without the approval of the instructor of the latter course;
  • Completing or participating in the completion of any portion of an academic assignment for another student to submit as his or her own work, including taking a quiz or an examination for another student;
  • Providing assistance, information, or materials to another student in a manner not authorized by the instructor.

b. Plagiarism: presenting as one’s own the work, the ideas, the representations, or the words of another person/source without proper attribution.      

Examples of plagiarism include, but are not limited to:

  • Submitting material that in part or whole is not entirely one’s own work without accurate and appropriate citations and attribution (including appropriate use of quotation marks);
  • Using the words, ideas, or structure/sequence of another person or source without accurate and appropriate citation and attribution (including the appropriate use of quotation marks).

c. Fabrication: falsification, invention, or manipulation of any information, citation, data, or method.

Examples of fabrication include, but are not limited to:

  • Changing material on a graded academic assignment and requesting re-grading for that assignment;
  • Presenting false or invented information in any academic assignment;
  • Presenting false claims regarding how information or data was collected or generated;
  • Providing an inaccurate account of how information or data was collected or generated;
  • Inventing or inaccurately presenting citations or sources.

d. Unauthorized collaboration: working with another individual or individuals in any phase of or in the completion of an individual academic assignment without explicit permission from the instructor to complete the work in such a manner.

 e. Misrepresentation: falsely representing oneself or one’s efforts or abilities in an academic assignment.

         Examples of misrepresentation include, but are not limited to:

  • Utilizing another person to complete any portion of an academic assignment in place of one’s self;
  • Having another individual sign-in for a course or use an iClicker or other electronic device to record one’s presence or participation in a class.

f. Gaining an unfair advantage: completing an academic assignment through use of information or means not available to other students or engaging in any activity that interferes with another student’s ability to complete his or her academic work

Examples of gaining an unfair advantage include, but are not limited to:

  • Retaining, possessing, using, or distributing previous or current academic assignment materials when the instructor has indicated that those materials are not to be retained or shared or are to be returned to the instructor at the conclusion of the academic assignment or course (including originals, copies, reproductions, or pictures and electronic or hard copy formats);
  • Taking pictures of, making copies of, or reproducing any academic assignment materials when the instructor has indicated that those materials are not to be copied or reproduced in any form;
  • Obstructing or interfering with another student’s academic work or ability to gain access to information to be used in the completion of an academic assignment;
  • Taking another student’s work without his or her knowledge;
  • Removing academic assignment materials from an instructor’s office, classroom, computer, or any other University space (physical or virtual/electronic);
  • Violating the procedures described to maintain the integrity of an academic assignment.

Attempts to engage in any of the above actions will be treated the same as completed acts.

2. What is the procedure for dealing with academic dishonesty?

This procedure includes the following steps:

  1. An instructor or department chair notifies the accused student (in writing) of the charge of academic dishonesty.
  2. The examination proctor (if appropriate), the instructor, and the chair or designee meet with the accused student.
  3. Following the meeting, the department chair/program director or designee determines whether the student has committed an act of academic dishonesty. If the student is not found to have committed academic dishonesty, the student is informed in writing. If the student is found to have committed academic dishonesty, a recommended sanction is determined.

To learn about options for witnesses and/or other procedural assistance for both faculty and students, see Chapter 5 of the Miami Student Handbook (PDF 892KB).

3. What are the penalties for academic dishonesty?

Penalties differ based on the circumstance in which the student is found responsible of the accused charge. These may include but are not limited to the following:

It's important to note that additional penalties may apply should the student have any prior charges of academic dishonesty or if the case involves more than one student. For more information on procedures and penalties, see Section 1.5.C.4 of the Miami Student Handbook (PDF 892KB).

4. Can I appeal if I am found responsible for an act of academic dishonesty?

Yes. A student found responsible for an act of academic dishonesty may appeal the decision in writing to the dean or his or her designee of the division in which the alleged violation occurred within five class days following the student's receipt of the notice of the findings.

Students who are suspended for dishonesty may also appeal to the university appeals board.

Appeals may be made on grounds of inappropriate sanction, procedural defects, or new evidence.

For more details on the appeal process, see Section 1.5.D of the Miami Student Handbook (PDF 892KB).

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Student Resources

Students walking on campus

A variety of resources is available to help students learn and practice standards of academic integrity.

Learn more

Locations
Luxembourg
West Chester
Middletown
Hamilton
Oxford
  • Luxembourg
    Luxembourg

    John E. Dolibois European Center, Luxembourg

    One of Miami's oldest continuous study abroad programs, the Miami University John E. Dolibois Center (MUDEC) in Luxembourg offers students the opportunity to enroll in Miami classes taught by European-based and Ohio-based Miami faculty. Students enjoy a unique combination of first-class academics, engagement in the local community, and various faculty-guided and independent travel opportunities.

    Contact and emergency information for the Luxembourg Campus. Starting with general contact info on the left; additional contact and emergency information on the right.

    Château de Differdange
    1, Impasse du Château
    L-4524 Differdange
    Grand Duchy of Luxembourg
    luxembourg@MiamiOH.edu
    MiamiOH.edu/luxembourg

    217-222 MacMillan Hall
    531 E. Spring Street
    Oxford, Ohio 45056, USA

    Directions

    Main Operator: 011-352-582222-1
    Oxford-based Coordinator: 513-529-5050
    Emergency info: MiamiOH.edu/emergency

  • West Chester
    West Chester

    Voice of America Learning Center

    Located midway between Cincinnati and Dayton along I-75, the Voice of America Learning Center (VOALC) offers undergraduate and graduate courses and programs drawn from Miami's Regional and Oxford campuses. Home to Miami's MBA program, the Learning Center provides ready access to graduate programs for area educators and courses leading to the BIS degree for undergraduates.

    Contact and emergency information for the Voice of America Campus. Starting with general contact info on the left; additional contact and emergency information on the right.

    7847 VOA Park Dr.
    (Corner of VOA Park Dr. and Cox Rd.)
    West Chester, OH 45069
     
    voalc@MiamiOH.edu
    MiamiOH.edu/voalc

    Printable Floor Plan
    Directions

    Main Operator: 513-895-8862
    (From Middletown) 513-217-8862
    Emergency info: regionals.MiamiOH.edu/emergency

  • Middletown
    Middletown

    Middletown Regional Campus

    Nestled on 141 acres near I-75, Miami University Middletown offers bachelor's degrees, associate degrees, and beginning coursework for most four-year degrees. Nearby Greentree Health Science Academy immerses Miami's nursing and health information technology students in the health care experience while taking classes.

    Contact and emergency information for the Middletown Campus. Starting with general contact info on the left; additional contact and emergency information on the right.

     4200 N. University Blvd.
    Middletown, OH 45042
    regionalwebmaster@MiamiOH.edu
    regionals.MiamiOH.edu

    Printable Campus Map
    Directions

    Main Operator: 513-727-3200
    (Toll-free) 1-86-MIAMI-MID
    Office of Admission: 513-727-3216
    Campus Status Line: 513-727-3477
    Emergency info: regionals.MiamiOH.edu/emergency

  • Hamilton
    Hamilton

    Hamilton Regional Campus

    A compact, friendly, commuter campus, Miami Hamilton offers bachelor's degrees, associate degrees, and beginning coursework for most four-year degrees. Small class sizes, on-site child care, and flexible scheduling make Miami Hamilton attractive to students at all stages of life and career.

    Contact and emergency information for the Hamilton Campus. Starting with general contact info on the left; additional contact and emergency information on the right.

    1601 University Blvd.
    Hamilton, OH 45011
    regionalwebmaster@MiamiOH.edu
    regionals.MiamiOH.edu

    Printable Campus Map
    Directions

    Main Operator: 513-785-3000
    Office of Admission: 513-785-3111
    Campus Status Line: 513-785-3077
    Emergency info: regionals.MiamiOH.edu/emergency

  • Oxford
    Oxford

    Miami University, Oxford Ohio

    Nationally recognized as one of the most outstanding undergraduate institutions, Miami University is a public university located in Oxford, Ohio. With a student body of 16,000, Miami effectively combines a wide range of strong academic programs with faculty who love to teach and the personal attention ordinarily found only at much smaller institutions.

    Contact and emergency information for the Oxford Campus. Starting with general contact info on the left; additional contact and emergency information on the right.

    501 E. High St.
    Oxford, OH 45056

    Printable Campus Map
    Directions

    Main Operator: 513-529-1809
    Office of Admission: 513-529-2531
    Vine Hotline: 513-529-6400
    Emergency info: MiamiOH.edu/emergency