Traveling Abroad

Make sure you have a signed, valid passport and visas, if required. Also, before you go, fill in the emergency information page of your passport!
  • Check for Travel Warnings and Public Announcements for the countries you plan to visit.
    • Travel Warnings recommend U.S. citizens defer travel to a country because of dangerous conditions.
    • Public Announcements provide fast-breaking information about relatively short-term conditions that may pose risks to the security of travelers.
    • The Department of State publishes "Background Notes" on about 170 countries.
    • These brief, factual pamphlets contain information on each country's culture, history, geography, economy, government, and current political situation.
  • Leave copies of your itinerary, passport data page and visas with family or friends at home, so that you can be contacted in case of an emergency. Keep your host program informed of your whereabouts.
  • Make sure you have insurance that will cover your emergency medical needs (including medical evacuation) while you are overseas.
  • Familiarize yourself with local laws and customs of the countries to which you are traveling. Remember, while in a foreign country, you are subject to its laws!
  • Do not leave your luggage unattended in public areas and never accept packages from strangers.
  • While abroad, avoid using illicit drugs or drinking excessive amounts of alcoholic beverages, and associating with people who do.
  • Do not become a target for thieves by wearing conspicuous clothing and expensive jewelry and do not carry excessive amounts of cash or unnecessary credit cards.
    • Be especially alert in crowded subways, train stations, elevators, tourist sites, market places, festivals and marginal areas of cities.
    • Don't use short cuts, narrow alleys or poorly lit streets. Try not to travel alone at night.
    • Keep a low profile and avoid loud conversations or arguments. Do not discuss travel plans or other personal matters with strangers.
    • Avoid scam artists. Beware of strangers who approach you, offering bargains or to be your guide.
    • Beware of pickpockets. They often have an accomplice who will:
      • jostle you, ask for directions or the time, point to something spilled on your clothing, or distract you by creating a disturbance.
      • A child or even a woman carrying a baby can be a pickpocket. Beware of groups of vagrant children who create a distraction while picking your pocket.
    • Wear the shoulder strap of your bag across your chest and walk with the bag away from the curb to avoid drive-by purse-snatchers.
    • Try to seem purposeful when you move about. Even if you are lost, act as if you know where you are going. When possible, ask directions only from individuals in authority.
    • Learn a few phrases in the local language so you can signal your need for help, the police, or a doctor. Make a note of emergency telephone numbers you may need: police, fire, your hotel, and the nearest U.S. embassy or consulate.
    • If you are confronted, don't fight back. Give up your valuables. Your money and passport can be replaced, but you can't
  • Deal only with authorized agents when you exchange money to avoid violating local laws.
  • When overseas, avoid demonstrations and other situations that may become unruly or where anti-American sentiments may be expressed.

You can call the Miami University Police Department 24hrs. a day if you need assistance. (513) 529-2222.

For more information visit the United State Department of State's Tips For Traveling Abroad website and additional information for airline travel can be found at Transportation Security Administation website.