Hanna House - Community Engagement and Service

Service-Learning

Service-Learning integrates community service or other forms of engagement into course content. As a result, Miami students are able to gain real world skills and enhance their learning while contributing to the community. The Service-Learning (SL) designation that appears on your transcript can inform potential employers and/or graduate schools about your course-based commitment to service.

Find a Service-Learning Class

  1. Visit the Miami University Course List.
  2. Scroll down to the Attribute box and select Service-Learning (SL).
  3. Fill in all other boxes with the appropriate information, such as semester you want to take the course and on which campus.
  4. Scroll down on the page and click Get Classes.
  5. Please note that S-L is designated as such by Section. A course with multiple sections could have some sections designated S-L and others which are not. Please pay attention to whether the section of the course you are selecting has the S-L designation.

View the General Bulletin for full course descriptions.

Spring 2018 Service-Learning Classes

Oxford Campus

AMS 301. American Identities. (3) Section A

Focusing on a specific theme, topic or issue, the course explores social and cultural identity, intercultural exchange, and public culture in the United States. The course connects theory and practice through collaborative and interactive research and learning in American Studies. Approaches include service learning, field research, experiential learning, or applied research. Prerequisite: AMS 205. Instructor: Sandra Garner

EDP 351. Miami Connections Mentoring. (1) Section A

This course involves students in an on-campus mentoring experience working with local high school students enrolled in the Miami Connections (Oxford) or Miami Bridges (Middletown) program. It is open to students of any major who are interested in service learning. Background checks and a one-year commitment are required. Instructor: Leah Hope Wasburn-Moses

SPA 210: ASL – Community Outreach Initiative Section A
This course holds a service learning designation. Through this course, students will further develop their receptive and expressive signing skills. They will use the vocabulary and grammatical concepts they learned in previous courses to explore native signer visual media. They will also further explore issues related to the American Deaf community, the ideas of advocate vs. ally, and environment creating disability. Student will observe these concepts as they interact and engage with Deaf individuals in the community. Through the ASL- Community Outreach Initiative, students will work with local Deaf individuals of varying ages and linguistic backgrounds. With guidance from the course instructor, students will identify the needs of these community members and develop and execute plans to meet those needs.
Pre-req: SPA 202 Intermediate ASL II or demonstrate appropriate linguistic knowledge through the ASL Placement Assessment. Completion of SPA 312 Global Perspectives on Deaf Culture is preferred. Instructor: Megan Gross

ENG 412. Print and Digital Editing. (3) Section A

Examines principles and practices of editors. Preparing communications for publication emphasized. Students edit their own and other students' work, and that of outside clients. Instructor: Theresa Evans

IES 474. Sustainability in Practice. (3) Section A

Application of sustainability principles to social and environmental problem solving, in an inter-disciplinary and project-based setting. Collaborative design of innovative strategies for addressing and resolving environmental concerns. Reflection on practical challenges of implementing sustainability principles in practice. Prerequisite: IES 274 or permission of instructor. Instructor: Amelie Yvonne Davis

GEO/SJS 159. Creating Global Peace. (3) Section A

Focuses on the study of peace, as represented across disciplinary boundaries and at local-to-global scales of analyses. Combines guest lectures, scholarly readings and other media, reflective writing and discussion, and a service-learning commitment that together explore different ways of thinking about peace, and 'peace' practices at global to local scales. IIC, IIIB. CAS-C. Cross-listed with SJS. Instructor: Kimberly E. Medley

GEO 442. Adv. Geographic Info Systems. (3) Section A

Advanced-level application of GIS technology to geographic problem-solving. Follows on from topics introduced in GEO 441 to provide (a) in-depth understanding of the technical and substantive issues associated with the use of GIS and (b) advanced-level training in the functionality of major GIS products. Prerequisite: GEO 441 or permission of instructor. Instructor: Robbyn J.F. Abbitt

GEO 459. Adv. Urban & Regional Planning. (3) Section A

Application of planning tools and techniques to significant urban and regional land use problems. Evaluation of major planning tools for redevelopment of central cities and declining regions in the U.S. Innovative techniques for solving American urban spatial problems at local to national levels. Prerequisite: GEO 451 or permission of instructor. Instructor: David Lloyd Prytherch

GEO 542. Adv. Geographic Info Systems. (3) Section A

Advanced-level application of GIS technology to geographic problem-solving. Follows on from topics introduced in GEO 441 to provide (a) in-depth understanding of the technical and substantive issues associated with the use of GIS and (b) advanced-level training in the functionality of major GIS products. Prerequisite: GEO 441 or permission of instructor. Instructor: Robbyn J.F. Abbitt

GEO 559. Adv. Urban & Regional Planning. (3) Section A

Application of planning tools and techniques to significant urban and regional land use problems. Evaluation of major planning tools for redevelopment of central cities and declining regions in the U.S. Innovative techniques for solving American urban spatial problems at local to national levels. Prerequisite: GEO 451 or permission of instructor. Instructor: David Lloyd Prytherch

KNH 402. Critical Refl on Practices. (3) Section E

Engages collaborative groups of students and faculty in problem-based and/or community Service-Learning initiatives related to health and the culture of physical activity. Students work in teams to critically analyze a social need or problem, and develop a reflective action plan for the community based on that need. Prerequisite: senior standing. Instructor: Helaine Alessio

SJS 216. Empower II. (3) Section A

Builds on the concepts learned in EMPOWER I to further explore issues of race and class and how they intersect in education. This course contains a Service-Learning component. Recommended prerequisite: SJS 215. Instructor: Rachel Michelle Radina

SJS/SOC 323. Social Justice and Change. (3) Section QA

Study of how social justice is realized through social change, focusing on the individual and collective actions of people fighting for their vision of a just world and a just future. Prerequisites: SOC 151 or SOC 153 or SJS/SOC 165 or BWS 151 or DST/EDP/SOC 272. Cross-listed with SOC. Instructor: Glenn Walter Muschert

SPN 322. Hispanics and Healthcare. (3) Section A

Explore social, political, and cultural issues that affect access to health care and wellness for Hispanic patients within the U.S. Designed to build cultural competency while continuing to develop linguistic knowledge of specialized vocabulary and content through readings, and intensive oral practice. Students will interact with community organizations and Hispanic patients through a 20-hour Service-Learning project as part of this course. Prerequisite: SPN 311. Previous enrollment in SPN 203 is recommended, but not required. Counts toward the Spanish minor and major. Instructor: Julie A. Szucs

SPN 331. Spanish for Community Work. (3) Section A

An introduction to the Hispanic community with an examination of the achievements and challenges of this community at a national and local level. Designed to familiarize students with the necessary information and skills to be able to work effectively with a partnering organization in ways that benefit the local immigrant community. Spanish 331 is also designed to further students' oral proficiency through intensive oral practice. Students will participate in a 20-hour service-learning project as a part of this course. Prerequisite: SPN 311. Instructor: Katherine M. Fowler-Cordova

EDT 425. TELLS: Literacy. (3) Section A

The third of three sequenced courses in the Teaching English Language Learners (TELLs) certificate, EDT425 TELLs in PK-12: Active Learning & Literacy provides the instructional foundations necessary for PK-12 teachers to work successfully with English Language Learners (ELLs) in the mainstream classroom. A field experience component, coupled with comprehensive case study assignments, enables teachers to obtain real-word understanding of the linguistic and literacy issues facing ELLs and their teachers in schools. IIIB. Prerequisite: EDT 221 or EDT 323. Instructor: Jeannie Marie Lise Ducher

 

Hamilton Campus

BIS 301. Integrative Studies Seminar II. (3) Section H A

Second required seminar in Bachelor of Integrative Studies program, shaped around selected theme. Integrates concepts, perspectives, and methodologies of student Concentrations. Emphasizes critique, analysis, and synthesis of knowledge and ways of knowing and of cross-disciplinary connections. Service learning project extends focus from student self to engaged learner. Prerequisite: a grade of C- or better in BIS 201. Instructor: Madhudaya Sinha

PHL 131. Introduction to Ethics. (3) Section H A

Introduces students to, and cultivates, ethical reasoning. The course will foster students' capacity to recognize ethical issues and situations, to understand different ethical perspectives and concepts, and to engage in ethical deliberation. Students will have opportunities to analyze concrete situations and human conduct in relation to ethical principles, ideas, and frameworks and thereby to reflect more deeply on their own values and on the social context of ethical obligations and ethical dilemmas. Course topics may include the nature of our responsibilities to ourselves and to others, confrontations between the rights of an individual and those of society, and consideration of what it means to lead a good life. The course aims to enrich students' ability to see themselves as ethical actors in the world. (This course is the first course in the Ethics thematic sequence and counts toward the minor in Ethics, Society, and Culture.) IIB. CAS-B. Instructor: Brian Todd Baer

 

Middletown Campus

EGS 215. Workplace Writing. (3)

Practice in varieties of workplace correspondence and communication with emphasis on writing clear, concise, and accurate informal and formal reports, including email, resumes, cover letters, incident reports, accident reports, sales reports, marketing plans, activity reports, progress reports, change controls, evaluation/performance reports, recommendation reports, and white papers. Instructor: David McAvoy

GEO 442/542. Adv. Geographic Info Systems (3) Section M A

Advanced-level application of GIS technology to geographic problem-solving. Follows on from topics introduced in GEO 441 to provide (a) in-depth understanding of the technical and substantive issues associated with the use of GIS and (b) advanced-level training in the functionality of major GIS products. Prerequisite: GEO 441 or permission of instructor. Instructor: Ziying Jiang

PSY 210. Psychology Across Cultures. (3)

A topics course, focused on the examination of culture and cultural perspectives, within the United States and globally, as frameworks through which theories and findings of the field of psychology may be critically evaluated. Prerequisite: PSY 111. Instructor: Katherine Jeanne Hayes

Miami Luxembourg

SOC 337. Aspects of European Culture. (3) Section L A

Reading and research on selected social science topics. Emphasis on European language materials and data sources. Substantive focus chosen each semester by instructor. Instructor: Philippe Briot

Summer 2018 Service-Learning Classes

Oxford Campus

ATH 426. Ethnographic Field Research. (3)

Collection, recording, and analyzing ethnographic data in a non-western cultural environment. Prerequisite: 12 hours of social science or permission of instructor. Additional Notes: Written Department permission required. To apply to the program or for more information go to www.studyabroad.miamioh.edu. A $175.00 Administrative fee is assessed at the time of registration. This fee is due and non-refundable even if the course is subsequently dropped by the student. Instructor: James Bielo