Service-Learning

Service-Learning integrates community service or other forms of engagement into course content. As a result, Miami students are able to gain real world skills and enhance their learning while contributing to the community. The Service-Learning (SL) designation that appears on your transcript can inform potential employers and/or graduate schools about your course-based commitment to service.

Find a Service-Learning Class

  1. Visit the Miami University Course List.
  2. Scroll down to the Attribute box and select Service-Learning (SL).
  3. Fill in all other boxes with the appropriate information, such as semester you want to take the course and on which campus.
  4. Scroll down on the page and click Get Classes.
  5. Please note that S-L is designated as such by Section. A course with multiple sections could have some sections designated S-L and others which are not. Please pay attention to whether the section of the course you are selecting has the S-L designation.

View the General Bulletin for full course descriptions.

Fall 2017 Service-Learning Classes

Oxford Campus

ART 271. Sculpture I. (3) Section A.

Studio course to provide the beginning sculpture student with a foundation in critical aesthetic thinking and of methods, techniques, and materials used in the process of making sculpture. Materials fee.
Prerequisite: ART 111 or permission of instructor. Instructor: Northcutt, Rodney W.

ART 395. Art Across the Curriculum. (3) Section A.

Philosophy, art education theory and cross-curricular teaching and learning methodology. Students will apply methodology to both coursework and field experience, collaborating with non-art areas. Students will design and produce lessons and sequential curriculum that takes into account both visual arts and common core standards. Upon completion of this course, students will conceptualize art as an interdisciplinary subject as well as demonstrate a competency for designing and implementing interdisciplinary art lessons. Field experience hours required.
Prerequisites: ART 195, ART 295, ART 296, or permission of instructor. Instructor: Danker, Stephanie

BWS 402. Engaged Learning Practicum. (1; maximum 6) Section A.

This course connects feminist theory and practice, and is designed around service learning at a practicum site. The readings explore leadership, feminist grassroots organizing, service learning and civic engagement, feminist activism, and difference and cultural competence. Students will have the opportunity to translate the knowledge, skills, and critical thinking they have learned in the classroom to actual practice, to observe and work with professionals who are addressing women's/gender issues in the field, and to reflect on their own roles as future leaders and professionals.
Prerequisites: WGS 201 or 202 or 301. Cross-listed with WGS. Instructor: Etter-Lewis, Gwendolyn

CSE 174. Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving. (3) Section I.

Algorithm development and refinement in problem solving. Modular programming using sequence, selection, and repetition control structures. Program debugging and testing. Formatted input/output. Data files. Fundamental data types. User-defined data types: structured and enumerated. Arrays and arrays of structures. Simple sorting and searching algorithms. Character data and string processing. Algorithm efficiency considerations. Classes, objects, and introduction to object-oriented programming.
Prerequisite: MTH 102 or higher, or a score of 12 or higher on the mathematics placement test, or permission of instructor. Instructor: TBA

EDP 201. Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts. (3) Sections A-B.

In-depth examination of theoretical issues and principles of human development and learning, including developmental changes, motivational and learning processes, exceptionalities and other individual differences, and dynamics of social groups. The ways human development and learning can be fostered within diverse social and educational contexts and the interactive influences of contextual differences on direction and nature of these processes are a major focus for systematic inquiry. IIC. CAS-C. Instructor: TBA

EDP 351. Miami Connections Mentoring. (1) Section A.

This course involves students in an on-campus mentoring experience working with local high school students enrolled in the Miami Connections (Oxford) or Miami Bridges (Middletown) program. It is open to students of any major who are interested in service learning. Background checks and a one-year commitment are required. Instructor: Wasburn-Moses, Leah Hope

EDT 323. Teaching English Language Learners in PK-12: Instructional Theories & Practices. (3) Section B.

The second of three sequenced courses in the Teaching English Language Learners (TELLs) certificate, EDT 323 TELLs in PK-12: Instructional Theory & Practices provides the instructional foundations necessary for PK-12 teachers to work successfully with English Language Learners (ELLs) in the mainstream classroom. A field experience component, coupled with comprehensive case study assignments, enables teachers to obtain real-word understanding of the instructional and assessment issues facing ELLs and their teachers in schools. IIIB. Instructor: Ducher, Jeannie

EDT 425. Teaching English Language Learners in PK-12: Active Learning & Literacy. (3) Section A.

The third of three sequenced courses in the Teaching English Language Learners (TELLs) certificate, EDT425 TELLs in PK-12: Active Learning & Literacy provides the instructional foundations necessary for PK-12 teachers to work successfully with English Language Learners (ELLs) in the mainstream classroom. A field experience component, coupled with comprehensive case study assignments, enables teachers to obtain real-word understanding of the linguistic and literacy issues facing ELLs and their teachers in schools. IIIB.
Prerequisite: EDT 221 or EDT 323. Instructor: Ducher, Jeannie

FSW 201. Introduction to Social Work. (3) Section A.

Provides an introductory understanding of human needs, social values, ideologies and institutional structures that have shaped the evolution of social welfare values and responses in America. The development of social work as a profession closely parallels the development of the social welfare system as we know it today. Traces the development of social welfare needs and the response of the social work profession. Instructor: Roma, Anne

FSW 466. Adulthood and Aging. (3) Section A.

Examination of the central importance of close relationships in adulthood. Topics include long-term intimate relationships, sexuality/sexual behavior, dating, singlehood, divorce, widowhood, parent-adult child relationships, siblings grandparenthood, friendships, retirement/financial concerns, caregiving, and policy issues impacting close relationships in adulthood. Instructor: Roberts, Amy

GEO 442/542. Advanced Geographic Information Systems. (3) Section A.

Advanced-level application of GIS technology to geographic problem-solving. Follows on from topics introduced in GEO 441 to provide (a) in-depth understanding of the technical and substantive issues associated with the use of GIS and (b) advanced-level training in the functionality of major GIS products.
Prerequisite: GEO 441 or permission of instructor. Instructor: Abbitt, Robbyn

GTY 110. Opening Minds through Art (OMA) Volunteer Experience. (1; maximum 3) Sections A-F.

OMA is an intergenerational visual art program for people with dementia. It is grounded in the belief that people with dementia are capable of expressing themselves creatively. Its approach is to capitalize on what people with dementia can still do. OMA currently offers its program at 15 sites that serve people with dementia in long-term care facilities, adult day centers and those living at home. OMA has four primary goals: 1) to promote the social engagement, autonomy, and dignity of people with dementia by providing creative self-expression opportunities; 2) to provide staff and volunteers with opportunities to build close relationships with people with dementia; 3) to show the public the creative self-expression capacities of people with dementia through exhibitions of their artwork; and 4) to contribute to the scholarly literature on dementia care and the arts. In this Service-Learning course you will volunteer weekly in the OMA program. IC. Instructor: Lokon, Elizabeth

GTY 310. Opening Minds through Art (OMA) Leadership Experience (2; maximum 6) Section A.

OMA is an intergenerational visual art program for people with dementia. It is grounded in the belief that people with dementia are capable of expressing themselves creatively. Its approach is to capitalize on what people with dementia can still do. OMA currently offers its program at 15 sites that serve people with dementia in long-term care facilities, adult day centers and those living at home. OMA has four primary goals: 1) to promote the social engagement, autonomy, and dignity of people with dementia by providing creative self-expression opportunities; 2) to provide staff and volunteers with opportunities to build close relationships with people with dementia; 3) to show the public the creative self-expression capacities of people with dementia through exhibitions of their artwork; and 4) to contribute to the scholarly literature on dementia care and the arts. In this Service-Learning course you will have a leadership role in OMA. IC.
Prerequisite: GTY 110. Instructor: Lokon, Elizabeth

SJS 215. EMPOWER I: Educational and Economic Justice and Service-Learning. (3) Section WA.

EMPOWER explores how educational and economic injustices impact communities and considers strategies for social change. Instructor: Radina, Rachel

SPA 621. Neurogenic Language Disorders. (3) Section A.

Advanced study in causes, management, and related research of adult aphasia. Prerequisite: graduate standing and approval of instructor. Instructor: Knollman-Porter, Kelly

SPN 331. Spanish for Community Work. (3) Section A.

An introduction to the Hispanic community with an examination of the achievements and challenges of this community at a national and local level. Designed to familiarize students with the necessary information and skills to be able to work effectively with a partnering organization in ways that benefit the local immigrant community. Spanish 331 is also designed to further students' oral proficiency through intensive oral practice. Students will participate in a 20-hour service-learning project as a part of this course.
Prerequisite: SPN 311. Instructor: Fowler-Cordova, Katherine

WGS 402/502. Engaged Learning Practicum. (1; maximum 6) Section A.

This course connects feminist theory and practice, and is designed around Service-Learning at a practicum site. The readings explore leadership, feminist grassroots organizing, service learning and civic engagement, feminist activism, and difference and cultural competence. Students will have the opportunity to translate the knowledge, skills, and critical thinking they have learned in the classroom to actual practice, to observe and work with professionals who are addressing women's/gender issues in the field, and to reflect on their own roles as future leaders and professionals.
Prerequisite: WGS 201 or 202 or 301. Cross-listed with BWS. Instructor: Etter-Lewis, Gwendolyn

WST 341. Interdisciplinary Synthesis and Action. (3) Section A.

Integrates diverse methods of inquiry to assist the development of student outreach projects that synthesize learning about a complex topic. Working on their own or in teams, students develop action-based approaches with a strong aspect of public performance and/or engagement. CAS-B-Humanities OR CAS-C Social Science. Instructor: Daugherty, Jacqueline 

Hamilton Campus

ATH 231. Foundations of Cultural Anthropology. (4) Section HA.

Survey of major theoretical perspectives in cultural anthropology. History, themes, debates, and controversies are approached in terms of their intellectual lineage, theoretical content, fieldwork methodologies and ethics, policy applications, and global relevance. Instructor: Cinnamon, John

CRD 202. Introduction to Nonprofits and NGOs. (3) Section HA.

Overview of the history, organization, and functions of nonprofits and NGOs, one of the largest sectors of the United State workforce. Visiting professionals from community agencies provide local connections and context, and service-learning experience allows students to engage and learn in additional environments. Instructor: Woiteshek, Sarah

CMR 401. Leadership Decision Skills. (3) Sections HA-HC.

The belief of this course is leadership can occur at any level of the organization and that everyone can improve their leadership skills. This course will develop leadership decision making skills required for effective leadership through the study of leadership approaches/theories and applications. Instructor: Baim, Susan

EDT 190. Introduction to Education. (3). Sections HA-HB.

Introductory course combining classroom activities, technology experiences and school visits to assist students in deciding whether or not to pursue a teacher licensure program and to begin the professional preparation process. Instructor: Vincent, Susan

Middletown Campus

CMR 401. Leadership Decision Skills. (3) Sections MA-MC.

The belief of this course is leadership can occur at any level of the organization and that everyone can improve their leadership skills. This course will develop leadership decision making skills required for effective leadership through the study of leadership approaches/theories and applications. Instructor: Baim, Susan

NSG 352. Childbearing Family Clinical. (3) Sections MA-MF.

Addresses the nursing role as provider of care for childbearing families Theoretical principles and evidence based practice are applied to the planning of and providing care for the childbearing family. Emphasis is placed on health promotion integration for childbearing families.
Prerequisite: junior standing as a baccalaureate nursing student. (BSN program) Instructor: TBA

PSY 210. Psychology Across Cultures. (3) Section MA.

A topics course, focused on the examination of culture and cultural perspectives, within the United States and globally, as frameworks through which theories and findings of the field of psychology may be critically evaluated. IC, IIC, IIIB. CAS-C.
Prerequisite: PSY 111. Cross-listed with AAA/BWS. Instructor: TBA

EDT 190. Introduction to Education. (3) Section MA.

Introductory course combining classroom activities, technology experiences and school visits to assist students in deciding whether or not to pursue a teacher licensure program and to begin the professional preparation process. Instructor: Mysona, Jennifer