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07/21/2014
Gregg Marcello
White footed mouse.jpgWhite footed mice are like the “canary in the mine” except they are in the woods. They can be found almost everywhere. Based upon their abundance we can make predictions about what is happening with other animals and plants. For example, if there are lots of mice than food must be plentiful. Lots of food means there might be fewer competitors like deer, birds, raccoons, and foxes. Therefore, places with lots of mice might be bad in some ways for other animals.
07/21/2014
Dr. Thomas C. H. Klak
prairiegrassimages.jpgWith over one thousand acres in the Natural Areas, they provide the opportunity to practically demonstrate what native prairie grasses look like and how to replicate them in our own environment.
07/21/2014
Dr. Mark R. Boardman
streams.jpg"Our health and the health of our streams are directly connected." All households have a connection to the stream. All the water we use goes to streams. (And rivers and oceans). The streams clean the water for us – and if we take care of them it is free. High quality life in our home depends upon having high quality streams for our water to go where it can be cleaned economically. Without them, we would have to pay for what nature will do for free.
07/21/2014
William H. Renwick
landuse-1.jpgGeography classes frequently use the Natural Areas as outdoor classrooms where students learn about the environment. Among the topics we study are the ecology of forests, stream erosion and flooding, and the lasting impacts of past and present human activities on the environment.
07/21/2014
Monica Rakovan
streamerosion.jpgI am trying to understand what human influences have done to our natural stream systems.
07/21/2014
Julie Means
ceruleansinging.jpgThe Natural Areas has the potential to house a lot of bird species. I was surprised to see from some 1938 photos how bare the land was and how much has recovered through the process of succession and land protection.
07/21/2014
Paul Schaeffer
American Cardinal.jpgWe are studying seasonal changes in energy use of the Northern Cardinal. Cardinals live year-round in Ohio and must cope with extreme winter.
07/21/2014
Dr. David E. Russell
baldeagle.jpgFor our bird research, we band birds, assign them numbers, capture lots of data about them; we monitor them year after year for how many return and what birds use the areas.
07/21/2014
Dr. James M. Rubenstein
teaching-1.jpgI take the students to the Natural Areas to make sure they are aware they exist. Once they experience them they are bowled over by what they see.