Good News Report

The Vice President for Student Affairs prepare a quarterly report of good news from the division for the Board of Trustees several times a year. Recent Good News Reports are available on this page. 

2016 - Fall Highlights (through November 17)

Community Engagement and Service

  • America Reads/America Counts: 1,030 hours of service (1:1 tutoring) has been provided to elementary-age students in Butler County through the America Reads/America Counts (ARAC) Federal Work Study Program so far this term. ARAC is designed to enhance the primary-level reading and math skills of children in our community while providing Miami students with the opportunity to impact children’s lives, develop a greater understanding of our youth’s educational needs, and develop valuable soft skills. 33 ARAC tutors are currently working in area schools and have attended an orientation and a training session focused on child poverty in Ohio.
  • Service Days: 151 students provided 455 hours of service to the Oxford area community through Service Saturdays and the Interfaith Day of Service. Students worked at Kramer Elementary School, the Animal Adoption Foundation, The Knolls (Senior Living Community), Oxford Empty Bowls (annual event), The Coalition for Healthy Communities, and local arts organizations to fulfill community needs. Each Service Day was accompanied by a reflection session that facilitated student learning and growth around issues of public importance.
  • Voting & Election Day:
    • Voter Registration - In partnership with the Armstrong Student Center, 350 students were registered to vote on campus.
    • Party at the Polls - An Election Day event outside the Shriver Center with two aims: 1) to celebrate the right to vote and make voting a fun experience for students; and, 2) to provide students with information about their polling location, confirmation of registration, and acceptable forms of ID. Party at the Polls was generously co-sponsored by Miami Activities and Programming (MAP), Kappa Alpha Theta, The Panhellenic Council, Student Activities, and the Andrew Goodman Foundation’s Vote Everywhere program.
  • Community Health Dinner: 42 students, faculty, staff and community members attended October’s Community Dinner focused on public health issues. The dinner, held at Talawanda High School, was co-sponsored by the City of Oxford and the Coalition for Healthy Communities and attended by the Mayor and Dr. Renate Crawford. The discussion centered around pressing public health issues in and around Oxford and possible solutions for problems such as substance abuse, obesity, and access to mental health care.

Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute

  • This fall semester, in partnership with the Leadership Certificate Program, the Wilks Lesson in Leadership team implemented 5 events with diverse facilitators and relevant topics:
    • Voting Beyond the Presidency (Part of Citizenship and Democracy Week) with Cincinnati Councilman Christopher Smitherman
    • Why a Community Arts Center Matters with Community Arts Center Assistant Director Caroline Lehman-Croswell
    • Oxford: More than a College Town with Mayor of Oxford Dr. Kate Rousmaniere
    • The ABC’s of Leadership with Miami Alumnus Mark Canon
    • When you Miss the Final Touchdown with Miami Alumnus and Obama speech writer Kevin Samy

We have seen an increase in attendance this year (out of the 4 years of existence), ranging from 12-60 participants.

  • The Wilks Leadership Institute hosted the annual Strengths-based Perlmutter Leadership Conference on October 23. The number of Miami students in attendance this year more than doubled from the previous year: up to 138 students in attendance compared to 65 in 2015. Throughout the conference, students participated in multiple Strengths-based sessions, activities, and discussions led by Gallup-trained facilitators from Miami University and the University of Cincinnati. Students mentioned the following as important lessons learned as a result of attendance:
    • How to connect their strengths to daily life
    • Confidence in effectively talking about their strengths to others in a variety of settings
    • The importance of focusing and building on strengths
    • In its second year, 65 students completed applications to participate in the Leadership Certificate Program for 2016-2017, up 18% from 2015 (55 students). The Leadership Certificate Program is a one-year program in which students are expected to complete a series of required leadership development activities and experiences. All Miami undergraduate students are eligible for participation.
    • Wilks Leadership Workshop Series. The Institute hosted two of the four workshops this semester. Both workshops, Growth & Authenticity and Character & Responsibility saw higher enrollments than previous years. This is likely due to the increase engagement in the Leadership Certificate Program.

Multicultural Affairs

  • GLBTQ+ Services, Women's Center, Spectrum and the ODA hosted Pumpkin Pride on Thurs. Oct. 27th for 50+ students to have an opportunity to have time to relax, paint pumpkins, enjoy snacks and music with one another. 
  • ODA and DAC hosted the 5th Annual Multicultural Student Leadership Conference themed "Crossing Borders: Global Leadership and Inclusion" on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016. We had 11 breakout sessions, presented by our undergraduate and graduate students, for participants to choose from throughout the day. Our keynote speaker was Noor Tagouri, the first hijabi journalist on commercial television in the United States of America. 
  • Spectrum hosted their Coming Out week Oct. 17th-22, 2016 with the following events: Coming Out Stories, Inclusive Sex Education Talk, Gay Agenda, Safe Zone Training, Movie Night and Alternate Prom. 
  • DAC and ODA hosted the Global Holiday Party for students, staff and faculty on Tuesday, Nov. 15, 2016 with a variety of entertainment acts by student organizations. 

Myaamia Tribe Relations

  • EDL 317 – Myaamia Language and Culture is the Myaamia student class this semester. 26 undergraduate students are enrolled in this first half of the Myaamia language year-long topic.
  • Six seniors are working on their Myaamia senior projects this semester, preparing for presentations in March.
  • Daryl Baldwin was recognized as one of this year’s MacArthur Fellows. He is the first Miamian to ever receive this award, the first Ohioan since 2004, and one of only 5 Native Americans to win the award since it began in 1981.
  • Chief Douglas Lankford was an invited speaker for the inauguration of the Greg Crawford as Miami’s President on October 10, 2016. Several Myaamia students marched in the inaugural parade carrying the Myaamia flag.
  • Six Myaamia applicants attended one of the Bridges Program sessions. Five of the 6 were hosted overnight by current Myaamia students.
  • Three additional potential Myaamia applicants have also indicated a strong interest in Miami, bring the total so far to 9 interested applicants for 2017-18.

Off-Campus Outreach & Communication

  • Created Off-Campus Ambassador student employee position to support off-campus students, and hired four students to serve in this role for the 2016-17 year. Ambassadors identified and began work on four projects, including a "take time before you sign campaign," a bulletin board in a bag for Resident Assistants, Landlord communication, and residence hall presentations on moving off campus. 
  • With the Associated Student Government, held the Fall Off-Campus Housing Fair, with 285 students in attendance and 20+ landlords and property managers in attendance.

Orientation and Transition Programs

  • Recruitment for Student Orientation Undergraduate Leaders (SOULs) is in full swing! Applications opened in early October. The office’s two undergraduate student orientation coordinators (who were SOULs for orientation 2016) are leading the recruitment efforts. A priority application deadline is in early December, and a final deadline is set for early January.
  • For the first time, all academic divisions are participating in a one-day transfer orientation for incoming spring semester students; this is also the first time that divisions are requiring new transfer students to attend an orientation, rather than a standalone advising/registration meeting. In winter 2015, OTP piloted a one-day comprehensive transfer orientation with the College of Arts and Science, who had previously hosted advising-only sessions for new transfers. The pilot was expanded for summer 2016, and all divisions participated in at least some of our 12 sessions; as a result, transfer attendance at our August orientation decreased by over 40%. For winter 2016/17, OTP is coordinating four Transfer One-Day orientations with a total capacity to serve 100 incoming transfer students. 
  • OTP held our second annual SOUL Homecoming Reunion Brunch on Saturday, September 17th. Approximately 25 former SOULs attended the event, connected with one another, and enjoyed a meal and slideshow of SOUL memories. 
  • OTP is developing a new 2-credit course to train Student Orientation Undergraduate Leaders. Assistant Director Elizabeth Walsh is leading the project, in conjunction with the Department of Educational Leadership. The course will be offered for the first time as an 8-week spring in Spring 2017.

Parent and Family Programs 

  • The Miami Parents Council held their Fall Meeting and welcomed 9 new families to the Council, representing the Class of 2020. The Council is currently focused on assisting the University in the following areas: 
    • Career Development with a focus in connecting students with startups for internships and full time positions and with developing business acumen in students who do not pursue a business degree.
    • Health & Wellness with a continued focus on decreasing high risk alcohol use and an added focus on assisting with efforts around sexual and interpersonal violence education and prevention.
    • Fraternity & Sorority Life with a focus on helping end the negative aspects, such as hazing, to increase opportunities for the positive aspects to impact students. 

Residence Life

  • In September ORL planned and implemented Art After Dark, a Late Night Miami program attended by 750 students. Students were able to participate in a variety of arts and crafts while listening to live acoustic music and eating handmade gourmet popcorn. 
  • The Education, Families and Society Living Learning Committee recently sponsored 19 of its residents on a trip to Chicago to visit museums to learn about incorporating experiential learning in the classroom, as well as to meet with MU Urban Teaching cohort alumnis, Rob Cron, to talk about teaching in an urban school district. Prior to the trip, students in the Living Learning Community (LLC) did a fundraiser to bring school supplies for students in Rob’s school.
  • In early October, 30 students from the Environmental Awareness Program LLC went camping and hiking in Southwest Indiana.
  • RHA hosted its 2nd annual Town Hall meeting for residents to speak with representatives from HDRBS, attended by 50 students
  • RHA hosted Safe Trick-or-Treat in the Armstrong Student Center that saw over 300 community children in costumes interacting with Miami University students/student organizations.

Rinella Learning Center

  • The Rinella Learning Center (RLC) and Student Disability Services are slated to move to the newly renovated space in Shriver during the month of January. The construction phase of the project is almost complete, with furniture being ordered and installed within the next month and a half.
  • The Rinella Learning Center’s tutoring program and supplemental instruction program are witnessing record numbers of student usage. Tutoring center usage is consistently up 30% from last year and the Supplemental Instruction usage is up 90% from last year. This translates into over 1,800 students being served through one of these programs for a total of 7,190 contacts with students since the first week of September.
  • The RLC Testing Center is also witnessing record numbers in terms of usage (up roughly 25% from last year). To date, the RLC Testing Center has proctored 1,230 exams.

Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership

  • The department had a record number of students apply for ACROPOLIS, the Emerging Greek Leaders Retreat. Over 200 students applied for an available 80 spots. The program had attendance from the majority of the fraternities and sororities at Miami and overall was a huge success.
  • Staff have worked with the Vice President of Finance and Student Organizations on ASG as well as General Accounting and Accounts Payable on a debt relief plan for student organizations.
  • 140 student organization and fraternity and sorority advisors completed the online CLERY training to be certified as mandatory reporters. 
  • The Re-visioning Committee for Fraternity and Sorority Life has been meeting weekly to make plans for the future of fraternity and sorority life at Miami. The committee has spent the majority of their time talking about hazing and brainstorming ideas on how to create incentives for chapters who don't have hazing as a part of their new member processes. 
  • Beta Theta Pi is re-colonizing on campus this fall with upper class men and in the spring with first year students. Their recruitment efforts have already been a success. 
  • Late Night Miami continues to offer programs to Miami Students on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights every week. Through partnerships with other departments, attendance continues to increase. Craft and art programs are among the most popular with over 700 students showing up to a Friday night Art After Dark Program hosted by Residence Life. Friday night movies attract 500 - 600 students and our annual Mega Fair had a record number of 4,500 students in attendance.
  • 25 new student organizations have started since the beginning of the 2016-17 Academic Year, bringing our total number of organizations to over 600. A few of our new student organizations are: Virtual Reality Club, Vietnamese Student Association, Girls Who Code, Miami Cricket Club and Tian Xia Hui.
  • A Miami student, member of Alpha Epsilon Phi Sorority, was selected to serve on the International Fraternity of Alpha Epsilon Phi. She is one of 6 students in the country to serve in this important leadership capacity and represent Miami on a international level. 

Student Counseling Service

  • The Student Counseling Service (SCS) collaborated with Associated Student Government (ASG) to help support a student-driven Mental Health Forum on September 15. The keynote speaker was Lt. Governor Mary Taylor who addressed the growing problem of drug abuse in Ohio. President Gregory Crawford and John Ward, PhD, our Associate Director, spoke to the crowd of over 400, about mental health and SCS services. Student speakers encouraged one another to seek mental health support services, and produced their own short documentary of Miami students who spoke about their mental health concerns and ways they sought help.
  • SCS and its Suicide Prevention Team sponsored Suicide Prevention Week, a week-long series of activities to raise awareness of suicide prevention efforts on Miami's campus. Over the week, close to 700 people participated in various activities including a mindful drawing workshop, a biofeedback workshop, free yoga classes, and a day-long resource fair called Suicide Prevention Day (SPD). At SPD, we were joined by 10 student organizations, campus departments, community agencies that encouraged students to engage in healthy self-care and learn about suicide prevention and treatment.
  • SCS and its Suicide Prevention Team partnered with the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention (AFSP) as well as numerous student organizations, Miami staff/parents, and community members to host the first annual Oxford, Ohio Out of the Darkness Walk on October 11, 2016. 453 registered for the walk and $9,212 was raised to support the cause. The SCS and mental health themed student organizations had booths on-site where students and Oxford community members could learn more about mental health services. 

Student Disability Service

  • Student Disability Services (SDS), in partnership with IT Services, hosted the 3rd Annual Accessible Technology Symposium on Friday, October 21, 2016 in the Shriver Center. This annual event provides opportunities for faculty, staff, and students to learn more about accessible technology for individuals with disabilities, and how technology is used to foster a more inclusive and equitable learning experience at Miami University. 
  • In August of 2017, IT Services will be opening the AccessMU Center which will be adjacent to the SDS/RLC space on the 3rd floor of Shriver and will be home to the IT Accessibility Team as well as Alternative Text Production Services and an adaptive technology lab for students. The AccessMU Center will be a close partner to SDS, and both offices will collaborate on training initiatives for faculty, staff, and students with regard to accessibility and building accessible course materials.

Student Wellness

  • HAWKS Peer Health Educators attended the Bacchus Initiatives of NASPA Conference, a national conference for peer education, November 17-20, 2016 in Kansas City MO and presented two programs: "It's Time to Step Up, We Did: Building Step Up for Your Campus" and "flourishMIAMI: Building Positive Mental Health".
  • Over 2,000 first year students attended a UNV 101 "Step Up: Bystander Intervention" training facilitated by HAWKS Peer Health Educators. 

Women’s Center

  • Women's Center website activity: 2,167 page views with 1,816 being unique page views.
  • Women's Center weekly e-newsletter activity: 7 e-newsletters & 1,725 subscribers.
  • The Women's Center was the primary organizer of 6 activities since the beginning of the semester:
    • 8/31: Women's Equality Day Voter Registration Drive (with League of Women Voters of Oxford), 123 students registered
    • 9/16: Joy Journaling for Mindful Gratitude (part of Mindfulness Week), 12 students participated
    • 10/5-7: The Clothesline Project, 30 new t-shirts made and 40 attendees at the closing ceremony
    • 10/31-11/11: Women's Center Clothes Swap
    • 11/2: Masculinities Film Series: "I Love You, Man and Bromance Media," 80 attendees
    • 11/11: Women's Center Film Series: Boy Meets Girl
    • The Women's Center co-sponsored 8 activities since the beginning of the semester:
      • 9/8: Rainbow Reception (with Diversity Affairs/GLBTQ Services), 97 attendees
      • 9/16: Ohio Consortium on Men and Masculinities in Higher Education (OCMMHE) day-long meeting (with Office of Student Wellness), 43 attendees from 12 Ohio colleges/universities
      • 9/20: "Sex and Size" facilitated discussion (with Student Counseling Service), 33 attendees
      • 10/3: International Women's Group Fall Gathering (with Global Initiatives), 18 attendees
      • 10/19 & 11/3: presentations to women's softball and basketball teams on resources available through the Women's Center & Diversity Affairs/GLBTQ Services, 58 attendees
      • 10/27: Pumpkin Pride Collective (with Diversity Affairs/GLBTQ Services & Spectrum), 60 attendees

Collaborative efforts

  • The Harry T. Wilks Institute continues its work on shared leadership development language. We met with each department in Student Affairs to get feedback on the proposed language and are now adjusting with the intent of finalizing and gaining concurrence on the language to be used division-wide. 
  • HIV Testing Days, a collaboration between Student Wellness and the Women's Center, are held the 2nd and 4th Fridays of the month. 40+ tests have been performed thus far this semester.
  • Family weekend programming reached record attendance, with 28 featured events on campus and in Oxford, with a specific focus on offering a wider range of events to attend throughout the weekend, in terms of cost, timing, and audience (such as events for younger siblings). From the farmers market and student performances up town to thousands of families enjoying the Wayne Brady show the Miami Activities and Programming Students planed outstanding events this year. 350 families and students were in attendance at our Friday night dinner and 150 families and students were at our Brunch on Sunday with the Crawfords. Through partnerships with Student Activities, MUSF, the Parent and Family Programs Office and the Performing Arts Series the weekend was a huge success. 

Committees

We will begin adding updates to our report from some key committees that may be of interest to the BOT.

Alcohol Coordinating Committee (ACC)

  • The Off-campus work group of the ACC is serving as the steering committee working with representatives of the International Town Gown Association (ITGA) and the Responsible Retailing Forum (RRForum) on the Alcohol Responsibility Program (ARP). The Oxford-Miami partnership was one of six town-gown teams selected nationally to participate in this program. The program was launched on November 10 with a community meeting. There were about 40 interested stakeholders in attendance -- including local representatives from the following stakeholder groups: permit holders, distributors; producers; the faith community; McCullough Hyde Memorial Hospital; the Chamber of Commerce; the City of Oxford; and Miami University. The ARP program is one of the many ongoing initiatives aimed at reducing high-risk alcohol consumption that have strengthened the Oxford-Miami town-gown relationship. 
  • The Policy and Off-Campus work groups are working to complete the details of the new "Good Neighbor" policy. The Good Neighbor policy is grounded in Miami's Code of Love and Honor, reminding students that they represent Miami University inside and outside of the classroom, and to encourage students to be responsible members of their communities -- on campus, off campus, and beyond. The policy focuses on two behaviors often cited by the Oxford Police Department -- litter and noise violations -- that are not only affronts to community standards, but also typically associated with problematic, high-risk, open house parties. The Good Neighbor policy tracks such violations over the course of a semester, and through letters and personal meetings with representatives from the City of Oxford and Miami engages students in developmental conversations about Miami values and community expectations. Eventually, three such violations over the course of a semester can result in an OESCR charge of "violation of the law," and if found responsible, the resulting sanction will emphasize "restorative justice" -- working with the City of Oxford, the sanctions will involve projects that reconnect the students in a positive and productive way with the Oxford community.
  • Intervention and treatment group: As part of a growing national collegiate recovery movement, Miami University is partnering with The Haven at College to assess the feasibility of offering a recovery housing option to support Miami students who are struggling with substance use issues and/or in recovery. The Haven at College is an independent organization with expertise in this area, and their goal is to design and develop a program that will address unmet needs within our Miami community while integrating seamlessly into our Miami culture. A team from the Haven at College visited campus and met with a large number of community and university stakeholders during the week of Nov 14-18.

Sexual and Interpersonal Violence Prevention and Response

  • Bennyce Hamilton, Regional Director of Diversity and Multicultural Services, has been designated as the Deputy Title IX Coordinator for Regional Students. This designation includes responding to reports of sexual misconduct, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking involving regional campus students.
  • Kathie Wollney, Miami University’s first sexual and interpersonal violence education and outreach (SIVEO) coordinator, began October 31, 2016. She will be responsible for assisting with education and prevention programming for students, faculty and staff on all Miami campuses regarding SIV.
  • Starting Nov. 14, Miami began hosting a Women Helping Women (WHW) specialist for regular on-campus support. This position provides confidential sexual and interpersonal violence support services to student, faculty and staff victims/survivors. 
  • It’s On Us week was conducted for the fall semester of 2016 during the week of 10/24-10/28, this week contained awareness raising events and informational sessions.

Staff Achievements and Accomplishments

  • Jayne Brownell has been named a 2017 Diamond Honoree by ACPA: College Student Educators International. Jayne is part of this year’s class of 17 national leaders being honored for “outstanding and sustained contributions to higher education and to student affairs.” An awards ceremony will be held at the ACPA national conference in March.
  • Leslie Haxby McNeill from Student Wellness received the NASPA BACCHUS Initiatives 2016 Outstanding Advisor award in November.
  • Jane Goettsch, Director of the Women’s Center, co-presented a workshop at the National Women's Studies Association (NWSA) Women's Centers Pre-Conference in Montreal on Nov. 10. Title: "Who Produces Knowledge, and What ‘Counts’ as Knowledge?”
    • Vicka Bell-Robinson, Associate Director of Residence Life, has had her article, “The Radical Middle: The Limits and Advantages of Teaching Grit in Schools”, published in the most recent edition of The Journal of School and Society
    • Hoa Bui, Resident Director, will have her poem, “The Song of a Lonely Bird”, published in the soon-to-be-released 6th edition of Student Services: A Handbook for the Profession.
    • Three ORL staff members received Regional Awards at the GLACUHO conference, held in November in Cincinnati:
      • Steven Sajkich, Resident Director, Tappan Hall, New Professional of the Year (State of Ohio)
      • Devon Hopson, Graduate Resident Director, Brandon Hall, Graduate Practitioner of the Year (State of Ohio)
      • Vicka Bell-Robinson, Associate Director of Residence Life – Service to the Association Award
      • Eleven ORL staff members presented or co-presented 13 sessions at the annual GLACUHO (Great Lakes Association of College & University Residence Hall Officers), held in mid-November in Cincinnati. 
      • OTP Director Buffy Stoll Turton served on the planning committee for the national conference of NODA: The Association for Orientation, Transition & Retention in Higher Education. Stoll Turton led the speakers and special initiatives arm of the committee for the conference. Buffy has also been named the Chair of the Research Committee for NODA, providing leadership in the area of research on orientation, transition, and retention for NODA members.
      • Dr. Ana Baratta, Gary Ritz, and Heather Morrow presented at the National College Learning Center Association’s annual conference on topics including assessment strategies, motivational interviewing, and supplemental instruction.

2016 - Summer Highlights (through September 1, 2016)

Armstrong Student Center

  • In 2015-2016, Armstrong Student Center was the location for 1,524 events, an increase of 12% from the previous year. 1,193 of these (78%) were student organization events. 313 were sponsored by university departments (27% increase).
  • Miami University participated in the NASPA Consortium Survey of Student Unions and Programming. Results from this survey show that the Armstrong Student Center was a factor in deciding to attend Miami University. Affirmative responses to the same question in 2010 were significantly lower than at benchmarked schools. In 2016, answers to this question are statistically significantly higher than the 2010 responses and compared to the national average.
  • This summer, Armstrong Student Center hosted 5 wedding receptions. Next summer, however, we are slated to have between 10 and 11 wedding receptions of Miami alumni! This means that we will have a wedding reception every available Saturday night between Commencement and Fall Opening 2017. 
  • Over the summer, Wilks Theater technology was significantly upgraded. The operation system was reprogrammed to allow for more options and control, and the microphones, wireless receivers and soundboard were replaced with a system equal in capacity to those in Millett and Hall Auditorium. Also a data input port was added to the rear of the room providing more flexibility for presentations.
  • On opening weekend, Armstrong Student Center hosted the 3rd annual Armstrong Palooza event to welcome new students to Miami University. Estimated attendance was around 2,800 with events all around the building, including popular comedian/magician Michael Kent, the Taste of Armstrong food event, Laser Tag, giveaways, and a band in Shade Family Room.

 Community Engagement and Service

  • 18 incoming first-year students participated in OCES’s new pre-semester program, Community DIVE (Diverse Immersion and Volunteer Experience). The students spent the first day of the program in Oxford and the second in Over-the-Rhine, learning about the local communities and the organizations that serve them and engaging in service. The program was mentioned by the Mayor of Oxford during Convocation.
  • OCES completed the sale of its fleet of 7 vehicles.

 Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute

  • The Scholar Leader LLC Retreat was held August 25-27 at Higher Ground Conference and Retreat Center in West Harrison, Indiana. Seventy-one Miami students participated in this 3-day transformational leadership experience focused on building community and creating the conditions for success in this unique living learning community. Residents also moved into Stoddard and Elliott Halls and began planning for programs that will be held throughout the year.
  • 48 Miami first-year students participated in U-Lead, a pre-semester leadership retreat that helps participants recognize their individual capacity for leadership, build community with Miami peers and mentors and consider continuing leadership development opportunities on campus. This year’s group was the largest ever as we doubled the overall capacity while still maintaining the small group methodology. We also hosted, for the first time, a parent and family member social to provide info about the retreat experience and build community. Approximately 50 family members attended this event which also was hosted by the Parent and Family Programs Office.
  • Following the completion of the spring departmental review and receipt of the external review report, the Institute spent the summer working on new strategic statements that will guide the strategic planning process. These statements are being shared with the entire Division of Student Affairs in order to create shared leadership language that will create increased opportunities for collaboration and increased leadership development impact.

Multicultural Affairs

  • Dr. Kelley Kimple joined us on August 18 as the new Director of Multicultural Affairs. Kelley is joining us most recently from Baylor University, where she served for 11 years in various roles. Kelley is looking forward to building relationships with the students, staff and faculty at Miami University. With a few recent retirements and departures, Kelley will be working quickly to fill the empty positions in her new area.
  • On August 15 the 1809 LGBTQ Alumni group hosted a reception for the Crawfords at the home of Bill Gracie and Daniel Fairbanks. The reception was attended by over 20 members and friends.
  • This fall we started off the year with our annual MADE@MIAMI program. MADE@Miami is a three-day pre-semester experience for first-year students who are ready to make the most out of Miami. We promote qualities valued by the university community—Mentoring, Achievement, Diversity, and Excellence. MADE@Miami is open to all entering first-year undergraduate students; students of color, LGBTQ+ identified students, international students, and students receiving Miami Access Initiative scholarships are encouraged to attend. We welcomed 185 new students to Miami at this program this year.
  • As part of our Welcome Week activities we hosted three different mixers/picnics, one for our Black Students & Friends, one for our Asian Students & Friends, and another for our Latino Students & Friends. Welcome Week is 12 days of more than 100 events designed to help students meet new people, connect with campus resources, learn their way around, prepare for their first semester, and have a great time!

Myaamia Tribe Relations

  • 7 current Myaamia students were counselors at the Miami Tribe’s Eeewansaapita summer camps, 2 in Miami, Oklahoma in June and 5 in Fort Wayne, IN in July.
  • A Myaamia rising senior did a summer field activity for her IES minor that included several trips to engage in research about tribal efforts devoted to food and wellness. Locally, she helped plant myaamia corn in an effort to replenish the traditional corn seed stock. She will organize other Myaamia students to be engaged in harvesting the planted crop with her.
  • 10 new first-year Myaamia students began classes this semester—9 on the Oxford campus and one on the Hamilton Campus. In an attempt to assist them in feeling like they belong at Miami more quickly several initiatives were implemented.
  • Our June travel schedules meshed well with the Summer Orientation sessions that our incoming students chose so we were able to organize meetings with the students and their families while they were on campus. We met with 8 of the 9 Oxford students.
  • For the first time we organized a pre-school session for the incoming students and all the Myaamia Center staff met with them for a Sunday lunch on move-in weekend.
  • We continued the partnering of current students with first-year students for some student-to-student communication during the month of August.
  • Friday, September 2 will be the second retreat for Myaamia students at the WRA Cabin. This will complete the welcoming special events for first-year students.
  • This is the largest group of enrolled Myaamia students we have ever had. There are 32 undergraduate students for 2016-2017 and 31 of them are receiving the Heritage Award.
  • A new graduate student in the SAHE program is the first full-time GA assigned to the Myaamia Center. The added bonus about her personally is that she is a Myaamia woman.

Off-Campus Outreach & Communication

  • Launched two new newsletters this summer - one to all landlords and property managers and another to all first year commuter students. Both newsletters will be sent out monthly through email. 
  • Met with 35 parents of commuter students in June to talk about resources for commuters and identify ways to support them.
  • Held an open forum with landlords / property managers in July to discuss office initiatives and house parties. 
  • The office permanently took over the Walkabout Program. During Walkabout, 76 volunteers visited over 1,200 permitted residences in the Mile Square, delivering information about safety, parking and living in a community. 

 Orientation and Transition Programs

  • Summer orientation concluded in late June, with a total attendance of 3,468 first-year students and 5,053 guests over 16 sessions. This is an increase of 9 students and 140 guests over 2015. The number of students who brought guests to summer orientation increased by 2%. We believe that most of this increase is due to our recent change in billing of orientation fees, which are now folded into the student matriculation fee.
  • Between May and August, we facilitated 12 sessions of our new Transfer One-Day Orientation, in collaboration with all five academic colleges. Over the 12 sessions, we oriented a total of 136 domestic transfer students (57% of incoming domestic transfers this fall), and 130 parents/guests. Transfer students appreciated the abbreviated program schedule, small program size, our focus on the transfer transition experience, and the opportunity to get their class schedules and student IDs prior to late August. Transfer one-day programs also helped decrease transfer student attendance at August orientation, which facilitated the success of that program.
  • Our fall 2016 relocation orientation had the largest-ever number of attendees – 42 students, and 24 guests. Orientation and Transition Programs (OTP) partners with regional campus colleagues, the One Stop, and Off-Campus Outreach and Communication to offer this orientation for relocating students each semester.
  • August orientation completed our orientation season on August 24 & 25. We welcomed 99 first-year students, and 51 transfer students, along with 107 guests. The program incorporated new elements that allowed us to focus on the transition needs for new transfer students separately from our first-year audience, including a new transfer transition session in collaboration with the Office of Admission, and a transfer student panel for new transfer students and their guests.
  • The new orientation and Welcome Week mobile app helped new students and families navigate orientation and Welcome Week with schedules, maps, and other helpful program information. We had a total of 9,465 downloads between May-August 2016 – and increase of 4,301 downloads over the same period last year. This is a huge success for our programs; the mobile app allowed us to stop printing the Welcome Week schedule in paper in 2015.
  • Welcome Week 2016 concludes on Monday, September 5. We are currently collecting attendance, but informal reports are that student engagement and feedback has been very positive.
    • One new innovative program, called It IS My Place, is a performance-based educational program focused on the important topics such as sexual assault/sexual violence, bystander behavior, alcohol and other drugs, and bias statements. We held the event in Millett Hall, and collaborated with the VP and Dean’s offices in Student Affairs, as well as the Office of Residence Life, the Student Counseling Service, the Office of Student Wellness, and the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Coordinator. Funding was provided by the Student Affairs VP and Dean’s offices, as well as the Miami Family Fund. Over 3,000 students attended (approximately 80% of the first-year class), and student response has been very positive.
    • Another new program for Welcome Week 2016 is Stop Hunger Now, an on-campus service project in which students packaged meals for communities across the globe that are impacted by hunger and poverty. Approximately 80 students attended, and packaged over 12,500 meals that will be shipped across the world to combat hunger. Students also signed up for the Miami Community Engagement and Service list-serv at the event. This event was supported by funds from the VP of Student Affairs Innovation Fund.
    • We used our Welcome Week 2015 video to promote our 2016 events; thanks to great promotion on multiple facebook pages (Class of 2020 page, Parent & Family page, Miami University page), our Welcome Week promotional video was viewed over 63,000 times!
    • Our staff has been involved in the UNV 101 first-year transition course as instructors as well as assisting with the coordination of Undergraduate Associates (UAs) for the course. Both OTP staff members are teaching two sections of UNV 101, and facilitated UNV 101 training for more than 80 UAs on Saturday, August 27. Elizabeth Walsh, Assistant Director of OTP, is teaching a UNV 101 for transfer students, which has its highest enrollment ever (including when the course was taught as EDL 110), with 35 new transfer students.
    • Our two new undergraduate orientation student coordinators for 2016-17 started in mid-August. Virginia Agee and Samantha Weiss, both juniors in the College of Arts and Science, were Student Orientation Undergraduate Leaders (SOULs) for summer 2016. As student coordinators, they will lead the recruitment and selection of the 2017 SOUL team, and support the development and facilitation of summer orientation 2017.

Parent and Family Programs 

  • Partnered with Orientation & Transition Programs to welcome 5,053 family members of new first-year students through 16 Family Orientation sessions, as well as approximately 82 family members of new transfer students across 12 transfer orientations.
  • Worked with the Alumni Association to coordinate 20+ New Student Send Off events for incoming Miami students and families. Events took place as far away as San Francisco and Atlanta and as close as Cincinnati and Columbus.
  • In collaboration with International Student & Scholar Services, held a luncheon and educational session for approximately 50 parents of incoming international students. The educational session was offered both in Chinese and in English. 

Residence Life

  • Over 3200 students, 82.1% of the first year class, attended the Fire and Personal Safety Fairs over the course of four nights. The event was coordinated by the Office of Residence Life, in collaboration with the Oxford Fire Department and Life Squad, the Office of Environmental Safety and Risk Management, the Miami University Police Department and the HAWKS Peer Health Educators.
  • Since Moving to an Opt-In Procedure for Living Learning Communities and Theme Housing, 85% of students requested to live in an LLC or Theme community.
  • 94% of students were assigned into their 1st or 2nd Choice Community Requests.
  • 22% of students in LLCs and Theme communities are co-enrolled into a common course experience.

Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership

  • The department hosted two informational sessions for orientation about getting involved and about Fraternity and Sorority Life. We had 1,119 total parents attend the Fraternity and Sorority Life sessions and over 900 parents attend the Getting Involved sessions over the month of June.
  • Late Night Miami will continue into its second year over the next academic year. We're excited to be offering programming every Thursday, Friday and Saturday night for the upcoming year with Late Night Miami. 
  • Fraternity and Sorority Life is developing an online course for all members about the value of involvement in fraternities and sororities at Miami with specific focus on hazing prevention. The course will be required beginning in Spring of 2017 for all members and new members of the fraternity/sorority community.

Student Counseling Service

  • Final end of the year statistics show that the Student Counseling Service (SCS) provided clinical service to 11.11% of the student body in 2015-2016, a dramatic 22% increase from the previous year. This increase is attributed to (1) the addition of two new staff positions in the past year, and (2) a significant re-design in the intake/triage process which reduced the initial consultation session from 50 to 30 minutes and significantly increased utilization of referrals to group workshops to more efficiently deliver psycho-educational skill training on commonly needed mental health skills such as anxiety and stress management, resiliency, and coping with depression. These changes also resulted in a 25% increase in the number of students seen for the first time, all but eliminated the wait for an initial appointment, and somewhat reduced the wait for on-going individual counseling.
  • End of year statistics also revealed a 16% increase in participants in outreach programs to a record attendance of more than 27,000, as well as newly developed social media efforts which contributed to a 126% increase in visitors to the SCS website. Efforts aimed at early identification and referral of students struggling with mental health concerns through completion of mental health gatekeeper training have now reached 21% of all MU students, faculty, and staff over the past two years, earning an award for the most student completions in the country. Significantly, these efforts are now reflected in the latest Health Minds Study data showing a 21% increase—from 66% to 80%—in the number of respondents who indicated knowing where to go on campus for professional mental health care, now exceeding the national average by 10 points, and significant decreases in MU students reporting stigma re: receiving mental health services. 
  • Following the sudden announcement of the impending resignation of the only University Psychiatrist in early June, SCS was able to successfully recruit a replacement for the position to begin by the start of classes in August, thereby avoiding a lengthy period in which students in need of psychiatric services would be unserved in the entire Oxford community.

Student Wellness

  • Miami University has been selected as one of six university/ city communities to pilot an Alcohol Responsibility Program through the International Town Gown Association, developed by Responsible Retailers Forum (RRForum). This program focuses on the responsible service and management of alcohol sales in retail, bar, and tavern establishments. A joint application was submitted by representatives of Miami University and the city of Oxford, Ohio.

Women’s Center

  • Women's Center website activity: 1,749 page views with 1,361 being unique page views.
  • Women's Center Facebook activity: 9 posts & current likes total 756.
  • Women's Center Twitter activity: 9 posts & current followers total 743.
  • The Women's Center stepped up in August to assist with the MADE@Miami program, and Rhonda Jackson has accepted Spectrum's invitation to serve as their co-adviser following Shevonne Nelson's resignation as Coordinator of LGBTQ+ Services. Rhonda is working closely with the LGBTQ student interns on fall programming, much of which is co-sponsored by the Women's Center.

Collaborative efforts

  • The Office of Community Engagement & Service partnered with Orientation and Transition Programs to develop an Orientation Food Drive. More than one ton of food collected at our 17 orientation sessions (June and August) was donated to the Oxford Community Choice Pantry.
  • A committee of faculty, staff and community partners, working closely with Interfaith Youth Corps' Campus Partnership Division, completed a strategic plan for "Engaging Across Religious Differences at Miami University." This plan is related to implementation of the Ford Family Initiative for Spirituality, Meaning and Purpose and a collective goal to promote greater engagement with different ways in which people make meaning in their lives whether religious, spiritual or secular.
  • The Office of Community Engagement & Service partnered with Student Counseling Services to offer the annual Welcome Wags event during Welcome/Welcome Back Week. Students, faculty and staff were invited to stop by OCES to play with therapy dogs and learn about volunteering at local animal shelters and other community organizations. Nearly 200 students, faculty and staff attended.

Staff Achievements and Accomplishments

  • Kathy Jicinsky (Assistant Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute) and Gwen Fears (Associate Dean of Students) presented an educational session titled “Creating a Culture of Assessment In Student Affairs: An Assessment Certificate Program” at the 2016 Student Affairs Assessment and Research Conference in Columbus, Ohio on June 24.
  • Dr. Eric Buller, Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute, and Kathy Jicinsky, Assistant Director, completed the requirements to be certified as Gallup Strengths Coaches. The certification provides additional knowledge and resources that, in turn, may increase the potential impact of the StrengthsQuest leadership development initiative on campus. 

2016 - Spring Highlights (through June 3)

Armstrong Student Center

  • Armstrong Student Center hosted 1,553 events during the 2015-2016 Academic Year. This represents and increase of 150 events from last year. 76% of these events were hosted by student organizations. There are 4 wedding reservations scheduled for ASC this summer and 6-8 scheduled for 2016-2017.
  • Study Room counts indicate that during the spring semester, almost 11,000 reservations were made in the study and small meeting rooms in Armstrong Student Center. Average reservation time was between an hour and half and an hour and 45 minutes. Additionally, over 900 hours of meetings occurred in the small meeting rooms.
  • The 15 member Armstrong Student Center Board welcomed 5 new members to seats filled through a competitive application process and 3 new student government appointees. The new members represent a broad range of campus involvement, class year and academic divisions.

Community Engagement and Service

  • April 22nd was Interfaith Day of Service. 25 students and faculty/staff participated in service opportunities at two Oxford agencies and engaged in an interfaith dialogue.
  • April 23rd was the last Service Saturday of the semester. 30 students participated in the service day at three community agencies in the Oxford area.
  • 19 new students have been selected to be OCES Student Leaders for the 2016-2017 academic year. Student Leader positions include, America Reads/America Counts, Community DIVE/Plunges, Volunteer Recognition, Community Connections, Education and Outreach, Days of Service, Interfaith Day of Service, Service-Learning, Social Action Center, and Vote Everywhere Ambassadors.
  • Miami Oxford – Office of Community Engagement & Service, Miami Hamilton – Center for Civic Engagement, and Miami Middletown – Office of Community Engagement & Service had a strategic planning retreat to focus on collaboration.
  • The Office of Community Engagement & Service partnered with Orientation and Transition Services to develop an Orientation Food Drive. All proceeds go to the Oxford Community Choice Pantry. 233 pounds of food have already been donated to OCCP after the first two days of orientation.

Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute

Annual Summary of Programs:

  • 76 total programs offered during AY 2015-2016
  • 2,047 students/staff in combined attendance at the 76 programs
  • 29 students inducted into Sigma Alpha Pi, the National Society for Leadership and Success and 12 students inducted into Omicron Delta Kappa, the National Leadership Honor Society.
  • 211% increase from last year in the number of applications received for the AY 2016-2017 Scholar Leader Living Learning Community.
  • 8 students completed the Wilks Leadership Certificate Program in its first year of offering. Each is now eligible to continue their leadership journey as Wilks Leadership Fellows. 
  • 916 StrengthsQuest Workshop participants – an increase from 781 last year and 502 the year before. 
  • U-Lead is a pre-semester leadership retreat for incoming first-year students that is held in August. Previous years have supported 25 students each. Sign-ups for U-Lead begin in May, prior to orientation, and typically registration is full within about 18 hours and a full waitlist (up to an additional 25 participants) is achieved by the end of the week. For AY 2016-2017, we decided to expand the retreat to 50 students. We opened U-Lead registration on May 2nd and filled the 50 slots in 8 hours. This past year saw 100% return of all participants from first to second semester with an average GPA of 3.36. We also find U-Lead participants to be highly engaged across campus. 
  • Wilks Leadership Certificate Program- In its first year of offering, 55 students applied for the program which provides a list of required developmental activities that are designed to provide a broad introduction leadership through the domains of self, others, knowledge and practice. These activities include: attendance at a StrengthsQuest workshop or activity, attend two lessons in leadership or similar events per semester, attend a leadership lecture each semester, read one leadership book and draft a reflection/review, participate in or lead a service activity, participate in one diversity activity, be a member or leader of a student organization, attend two leadership workshops, conduct one leader interview, complete one career development activity and draft a Leadership Philosophy statement. Each of these required a reflection to be submitted to earn completion. In this first year, we purposefully used a “hands-off” approach by simply providing the requirements and tracking with reminders limited to a brief newsletter every two weeks. Eight students successfully completed all requirements and are now eligible for enrollment as Wilks Leadership Fellows next year. We will evaluate our approach this summer and by using the eight students as advisory council members. 

Myaamia Tribe Relations

  • Chief Lankford and Daryl Baldwin made special presentations to the Board of Trustees about the Miami Tribe and the Myaamia Center.
  • 18 Myaamia students + 4 Tribe and Center staff joined the Board, Chief, Daryl and Dr. Hodge and his Executive Council for breakfast before the public Board meeting.
  • Four Myaamia students graduated in May 2016. Three people received undergraduate degrees, increasing the total number of Myaamia undergraduate degrees to 59.
  • One person received a graduate degree, increasing the total number of Myaamia graduate degrees to 6. This was the second Myaamia person to earn two degrees from Miami.
  • As of June 2016, 109 Myaamia students have enrolled at Miami, 65 have graduated and 23 will return in the fall. The graduation/retention rate over the 25-year period is 79.8%.
  • Nine new incoming Myaamia students will enter in Fall 2016. This will increase the total of Myaamia students at Miami to 118.
  • Seven Myaamia students will be counselors at one of the Miami Tribe Eewansaapita Summer Camps, either in Miami, Oklahoma or Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Off-Campus Outreach & Communication

  • Sent Off Campus Living Survey to all junior students who live off campus in April/May. With a 16% response rate, we will use the data compiled to inform decisions about educational materials, landlord/property manager communication, and prepare a baseline measurement for future programs and data collection.
  • Finalized content and design on "Student Affairs at Miami University," the Division's 32-page printed pamphlet highlighting each department for an external audience. Printed 150 copies of the pamphlet with digitized version forthcoming.
  • For the first time, the Office is hosting a session for families of commuter students during summer orientation (day 2 of the program). The session involves a quick tour of the Commuter Center in Armstrong, and a conversation about how to support a student who commutes. 

Orientation and Transition Programs

  • Summer orientation kicked off on Wednesday, June 1, with the first of sixteen summer sessions for the class of 2020. As of June 5, 96% of confirmed domestic students had registered for a summer orientation session; which is 2% up from last year at this time. We expect approximately 9,000 students and family members will attend one of these summer sessions; we will also offer our August orientation session for those who are unable to attend a summer session.
  • Transfer one-day orientation kicked off on Friday, May 20, with the first of twelve summer sessions for incoming transfer students and their families. This is a new initiative for Orientation and Transition, which was successfully piloted in December/January. All academic colleges are participating in at least three of the twelve sessions.
  • The new orientation mobile app is helping new students and families navigate orientation with schedules, maps, and other helpful program information; so far, the guide has been downloaded 1,050 times; we expect that to increase significantly as orientation sessions continue.
  • Summer orientation programs will offer 60 sessions (30 total hours) of education on sexual assault and personal/social responsibility, including alcohol and campus safety. Staff from the Dean of Students office is presenting to first year students and families as well as new transfer students at each orientation program this summer.
  • We’ve begun planning for Welcome Week, and one new innovative program will focus on the important topics such as sexual assault/sexual violence, bystander behavior, and more. The program is called “It Is My Place,” and is a performance-based program for sexual assault/misconduct education. We have received funding from the Division of Student Affairs (innovation fund), the Dean of Students (special events fund), the Family Fund, and the Creativity and Innovation Steering Committee. We are partnering with the Office of Residence Life, the Student Counseling Service, the Office of Student Wellness, and the Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Coordinator.

Parent and Family Programs

  • For the entire academic year - over $210,000 has been distributed in the form of Miami Family Fund grants to support student organizations and department initiatives, as well as student travel for study abroad and professional conference attendance. Over 1,000 students have been direct recipients of support, thousands impacted indirectly (through support of Late Night Miami). Twenty of these grants have been given to faculty members to support out-of-class interactions with students, with a total of 504 students participating. 

Residence Life

  • 145 new RAs have been hired and had their initial staff meetings for the 2016-17 academic year, who are joining the 118 returning RAs in Residence Life.
  • The Residence Life Video Production committee produced 19 short videos for use in 2016-17 for RA training purposes, as well as RA recruitment purposes.
  • Community Leadership Teams (residence hall student government organizations) implemented 114 programs in the areas of student advocacy, community building, and living learning communities
  • RAs implemented 961 programs/initiatives in the areas of the four goals of the Residential Curriculum
  • RDs conducted 225 developmental follow-up student conduct conversations
  • Residence Life staff responded to 111 crisis or emergency situations
  • The Residence Hall Association successfully implemented the annual RedHawk Hunt, a campus-wide photo scavenger hunt, which involved 11 teams, comprised of a total of 125 students
  • Sharefest (May 9-15) in the residence halls was very successful. Although final amounts have not yet been tallied, the Sharefest Planning Committee reported that tons of still-useful clothing, school supplies, household goods and food were donated by residence hall students. Residence Life staff were lauded for their management of Sharefest drop-off sites in each residence hall.

Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership

  • Spring events were a success for our department. We had over 4,500 students at our annual Spring Fest; the event was full of carnival games, rides and entertainment for students all day. We also hosted a Spring Concert which had over 1,500 in attendance on the last Saturday night of the semester. 
  • The office had over 400 people in attendance at our annual Student Engagement and Leadership Awards in April. We recognized over 40 student organizations and student leaders for outstanding programming, engagement and leadership. 
  • The Hazing prevention committee increased participants in the annual Hazing Prevention Survey. 286 students voluntarily took the survey this spring. 
  • Late Night Miami wrapped up its first year in May with a total of 105 events for the year. 
  • Miami Activities and Programming (MAP) won 2 awards at the SEAL Awards - Best Graphic Design and Most Creative Event
  • The Fraternity and Sorority Community had a record number of people participating in Greek Step Up Program for spring 2016. This program is a partnership with the Peer Hawks and is a Bystander Behavior program. This program reached 1,381 students this past spring. 

Student Counseling Service

  • Student Counseling Service and other offices and departments from the Suicide Prevention Team planned and produced the second annual Stress Less Week, April 11 - 15. The week included many mental health education and prevention activities throughout the week delivered by a wide variety of offices and departments. The highlight was Stress Less Day at the Armstrong Student Center, a mental health fair, which was attended by over 1,000 students, faculty and staff--the single best attended mental health promotion event ever at Miami. 
  • Preliminary data re: clinical service provision for the 2015-16 academic year suggest that the following approximate percentage changes from the previous year will obtain:
    • 5% increase in total individual students receiving clinical services;
    • 12% increase in number of clinical appointments, including 20% increase in group sessions attended;
    • 88% increase in students receiving clinical service for the first time;
    • elimination of wait list for an initial triage session;
    • 20% decrease in average wait time post initial consultation for on-going individual counseling during the Spring semester.
  • These improvements are attributed to the combination of increase in counseling staff by two FTE as well as a shift to a new intake/triage model that includes brief 30-minute initial consultations and heavy referral to an expanded workshop/group lineup to provide psycho-educational interventions to groups of students seeking assistance with common symptoms such as anxiety, depression, concentration difficulties, and emotional dysregulation. 
  • Two staff of the Student Counseling Service, Dr. John Ward, Associate Director, and Dr. Ashley Wilson, Coordinator of Women's Services, delivered an 8-hr training in Mental Health First Aid to the medical training staff of Inter-Collegiate Athletics. This is the latest, and most significant step yet in a budding collaborative relationship between ICA and SCS in implementing the first-ever NCAA mandated interventions in improving early detection and referral of student athletes struggling with mental health concerns.

Student Wellness

  • During the 2015/16 school year, 4,425 students participated in the Step Up! Bystander Intervention program. This program teaches student the skills to safely and effectively intervene when they witness situations that are dangerous or do not reflect the values of Miami University. 
  • The Office of Student Wellness will continue to provide free HIV testing and sexual health education through a collaboration with BACCHUS and Associated Student Government using "The Big O," the Opportunities for Health and Wellness Gazebo. 
  • The Office of Student Wellness will be expanding programming about sexual and interpersonal violence prevention, including a new staff position to oversee an ongoing, university wide campaign. 

Women’s Center

  • Patron Traffic: 650 visits to the Women's Center April through May
  • Assessment: Highlights from the Spring 2016 Patron Survey, completed by 58 of 173 students (33.5% response rate) who visited the Center April 19-22, include that:
    • Respondents typically visit the Women's Center on a weekly basis
    • 84% of respondents report that the staff meets their needs considerably to a great deal
    • 96% of respondents report that the Women's Center provides value to their college experience
    • These top five words - comfortable, helpful, safe, useful, and welcoming - emerged when respondents were asked to describe the Women's Center in three words. Open, warm, caring, accepting, calm, convenient, and friendly were also popular word choices.
    • Health/wellness and relationships are the top two areas that respondents would like additional programming on
    • Campus partners were Student Wellness, Student Counseling Service, Global Initiatives, Intercollegiate Athletics, and Provost's Office
  • Student Employment: Hired six new student interns for the 2016-17 school year
  • Programming: Eight small programs sponsored or co-sponsored, several initiated/facilitated by our student interns, with a total attendance of about 90 

 Staff Achievements and Accomplishments

  • Dr. Eric Buller, Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute, after three years of service as the Vice President of the National Collegiate Boxing Association (NCBA), was recently elected as the President of the NCBA. The NCBA is the national governing body for collegiate boxing and is a group member of USA Boxing. This position entails a four-year term. Dr. Buller is the advisor and coach of the Miami University Boxing Club. 
  • This year, graduation marked the end of employment at Armstrong Student Center for the last 5 student staff that had been on our team since opening in January 2014. Their leadership and experience will be greatly missed. 
  • 7 student leaders from the Residence Hall Association (RHA) plus advisers will be attending the National Association of College & University Residence Halls national conference in June being held at the University of Delaware

2016 - Spring Highlights (through April 18)

Community Engagement and Service

  • There are 41 Service-Learning course sections on the Oxford campus for Spring 2016. Total enrollment is 731. Enrollment in Office of Community Engagement & Service (OCES) coordinated courses is 268.
  • 38 reading and math tutors were hired through the America Reads/Counts work study program for the spring semester. These students are serving at 12 local schools and after-school sites.
  • February 27th was the first Service Saturday of the semester. More than 70 students participated in the service day at three community agencies in the Oxford area.
  • During March OCES partnered with the Social Work and Family Studies Department and Career Services to present the inaugural Social Work and Nonprofit Expo. Over 25 community partners were present for the Nonprofit Expo.
  • OCES partnered with the Provost’s Office to nominate a student and a faculty member for the Campus Compact national and state awards. Both were selected as recipients.
    • Miami University Department of Art Professor Rod Northcutt was awarded the 2016 David Hoch Memorial Award for Excellence in Service. Professor Northcutt is a member of the university's Service-Learning Designation Committee and utilizes Service-Learning pedagogy in his sculpture courses. He's also a co-founder of MAKETANK Inc. which organizes the Oxford Kinetics Festival.
    • Student Rebekah Bolser was selected as a 2016 Newman Civic Fellow, and was awarded the Charles J. Ping student service award by Ohio Campus Compact. The Newman Civic Fellows Award honors inspiring college student leaders who have demonstrated an investment in finding solutions for challenges facing communities throughout the country. Through service, research, and advocacy, Newman Civic Fellows are making the most of their college experiences to better understand themselves, the root causes of social issues, and effective mechanisms for creating lasting change.

 Diversity Affairs

  • Spectrum Awareness Week took place February 29 - March 5. Events included two days of pronoun awareness raising, free HIV testing, ally education/training, a well-attended panel on masculinity, an annual corn-hole tournament, and a guest performance by award winning poetry duo Sister Outsider.
  • Diversity Week was sponsored by the Office of Diversity Affairs and the Diversity Affairs Council March 5-12. Events included the Unity Day March to Uptown Oxford which included spoken word performances and a luncheon, a Poetry Slam, Students of Color Abroad narratives coordinated by the Study Abroad office

Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute

  • Thirty-nine Miami students attended the 6-day LeaderShape Institute retreat over spring break at Higher Ground Conference and Retreat Center in West Harrison, Indiana. The students were joined by 5 Miami staff members who served as facilitators for the discussions and activities surrounding values, power, privilege, vision, communication, and leadership styles.
    • 100% of students created a bold, challenging vision statement for themselves and a group they care about (i.e. access to education, eradicating world hunger, ending sexual assault and interpersonal violence, etc.).
    • 90% of students feel empowered to make positive change in the world after attending the LeaderShape Institute.
    • An important lesson learned as a result of participation in the LeaderShape Institute:
      • “Dream big and take steps to actually achieve your goals.”
      • “Leadership is often just as much about the process as it is about the end result, and that we should never compromise our values to achieve any goal.”
      • “We all have underlying stories that influence who we are and what we say.”
      • “To live uncomfortably and to push out of your comfort zone on a daily basis.”
    • On April 3, 29 students were inducted into the Miami chapter of Sigma Alpha Pi, the nation's largest leadership honor society. Additionally, three formally inducted members received the National Engaged Leader Award for their ongoing commitment to society values of leadership, success, and service.
    • The current Scholar Leader Living Learning Community received over 230 applications for undergraduates to join next year's cohort of Scholar Leaders, twice the number we received last year. We selected 77 students to join the community and were able to be more selective with a competitive and diverse applicant pool. ​
    • On April 15, the Institute hosted its annual High School Leadership Conference. Over 100 high school students and 20 high school faculty from 20 different schools participated in leadership workshops presented by Miami staff, faculty and students (undergraduate and graduate). 
    • Dr. Maura Cullen presented the annual Wilks Leadership Lecture on April 13. Dr. Cullen, known nationally as “The Diversity Speaker” is the author of the book, “35 Dumb Things Well-Intended People Say” and a co-founder of the Social Justice Training Institute. 
    • The Wilks Leadership Institute completed the Departmental Review process this year. The review began with a comprehensive self-study that was drafted by Institute staff in the fall term. In February, a two-person external review team, from the University of Delaware and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, visited campus for two days and met with over 50+ stakeholders and partners. In March, the external review team provided its report which will be used in an upcoming comprehensive strategic planning process for the Institute. This report focused on six key areas: Mission and Purpose, Shared Leadership Language, Programs and Services, Under-represented Populations, Collaboration, and Facilities.

Myaamia Tribe Relations

  • There are 25 Myaamia students receiving the Heritage Award this semester, with one studying abroad at the Luxembourg campus. Two additional Myaamia students are active with our group, a 2nd year graduate student and a non-traditional Hamilton student who plans to be full time on the Oxford campus in the fall. 
  • The research project continues with documenting interviews of the Myaamia students at Miami looking for impacts that the Miami Nation’s language and cultural revitalization efforts have on student experiences at Miami and their evolving identity. The first years and seniors were interviewed individually and the sophomore and juniors were interviewed in small groups. In addition this year, several graduates at the conference joined a discussion with the researchers about their Miami experiences.
  • Eight Myaamia high school seniors have been accepted to Miami and confirmed their enrollment for Fall 2016. The Myaamia student group will increase to 31 students, the highest level yet.
  • January 28-31, 2016 was the annual trip to Oklahoma to participate in the Miami Tribe’s Winter Gathering and Stomp Dance. 49 individuals were part of the weekend trip this year. There were 13 student participants, 8 Myaamia students, 2 RAs, 2 Miami Student reporters and an IES major. The group also included 2 ORL Resident Directors, 10 faculty/staff from the School of Education, Health, and Society and two Vice Presidents.
  • April 2, 2016 was the 7th biennial Myaamiaki Conference and Stomp Dance and 17 Myaamia graduates returned to campus to attend the event. One session, about a project to create an outdoor tribute to the Miami Tribe on the Oxford Campus, included 3 current Myaamia students who are part of the planning team for this initiative. Five additional sessions involved Myaamia graduates as presenters, 3 who earned Miami undergraduate degrees, one who has 2 Miami degrees and one who did his PhD at Miami. 

Off-Campus Outreach & Communication

  • OCOC created a new student position "Student Associate for Social Media" and hired three students to increase social media capacity for the division.
  • Student Affairs now has a blog: http://blogs.miamioh.edu/student-life/. Content will be driven by the Student Associates for Social Media. 
  • With ASG, we held a spring "Off-Campus Housing Fair" on February 22 with about 45 property managers representing 21 different agencies / companies and about 325 students in attendance.
    • Offered section of the Housing Fair for subleases this year for the first time as well. 
    • 100% of property managers surveyed agreed or strongly agreed that the event was worth their time and that they would be back for future events. 
  • With the Alcohol Coordinating Committee and the City of Oxford, we started a process in which off-campus students now receive a letter from Miami University and the City of Oxford when they receive noise or litter citations off-campus. The letter informs students that the citations are public record, and reminds them about their responsibilities as community members and about Miami University values. 

Orientation and Transition Programs

  • As of March 2016, we have changed our office name from New Student Programs to Orientation and Transition Programs. The new name aligns more closely with our mission and work and makes our office more recognizable to public audiences seeking out information about Miami’s orientation programs. The transition portion of the name reflects the office's mission to support student transitions through a variety of resources and programs, including Welcome Week, UNV 101 first-year and transfer courses, the UNV 101 undergraduate associate program, and the Student Orientation Undergraduate Leader (SOUL) program. 
  • Registration for summer orientation opened on March 30. Since then (through April 17), 1,834 students, or 75% of currently confirmed domestic students, have registered for one or our 16 first-year sessions, which take place in June. 
  • Registration for our new transfer one-day orientations opened on April 5. So far, 16 students have registered for one of our 12 transfer one-day sessions, which span May through August.
  • We have completed our selection process and begun training for the 2016-17 Student Undergraduate Orientation Leaders (SOULs). Targeted recruitment efforts led to a 24% increase in applicants this year – our largest applicant pool in the last three years. 
  • OTP staff have been participating in Miami’s Year of Creativity and Innovation. Director Buffy Stoll Turton has served on the university steering committee, and Assistant Director Elizabeth Walsh is a member of the “Introduce” subcommittee, whose work aims to creatively introduce new students, faculty, and staff to Miami. As part of the Introduce subcommittee work, alumna Kimberly Quindlen (’12) will visit campus on April 21-22 with a colleague from Chicago’s Second City Improv School, to facilitate workshops and class visits focused on utilizing improv techniques in student leadership. An additional session will be offered for faculty and staff, focused on how to incorporate improv skills into teaching and student leader trainings.

Parent and Family Programs

  • The Miami University Parents Council held its Spring Meeting on March 11-12. The Council discussed progress on their three areas of focus and established goals for the 2016-2017 academic year. The Health & Wellness Focus Team will continue to help Miami engage parents in conversations surrounding high-risk alcohol use by students, while also partnering with Miami to address sexual and interpersonal violence in the Miami University Community. The Career Development Focus Team will conduct an audit of career-related communication to parents throughout their student’s time at Miami, while continuing to encourage additional companies to recruit Miami students for internships and full-time jobs. The newly created Greek Life Focus Team will assist Miami with developing ways to engage families in conversations about preventing hazing and other inappropriate conduct within some chapters, as well as the continued excellence of sororities and fraternities on campus.
  • Year to date, the Miami Family Fund has distributed approximately $150,000 to various student organizations and department initiatives, as well as student travel for study abroad and professional conference attendance. Over 600 students have directly benefited from Family Fund support.

Residence Life

  • In February-March, 2016, ORL staff:
    • Offered 525 programs/initiatives/events supporting the four goals of the Residential Curriculum
    • Conducted 240 meetings with students to talk about their conduct in the residence halls and on campus
    • Responded to 117 crisis, emergency, and mental health situations
    • Resolved 88 roommate conflicts
    • Taught 22 credit-bearing courses
    • Provided 283 hours of training to Residence Assistants
    • 32 residence hall student leaders have been inducted into Miami’s Richard L. Nault Chapter of the National Residence Hall Honorary (NRHH).
    • The Financial Cents & Entrepreneurship Living Learning Community (LLC) attended a Cincinnati Reds game and met with Reds personnel about business opportunities and internships with the ball club.
    • 22 Dodds Hall residents as part of the Computing Scholars LLC went to Columbus to COSI (Center of Service and Industry) where they had a tour and had discussions with COSI staff.
    • The Community Leadership Team of Clawson Hall coordinated the Potato Game. Operating under a strict set of “potato” rules, a single potato was hidden in one of the residence hall corridors, and residents of that corridor had to find the potato and hide it in another corridor. Each corridor was also assigned one of the building’s common areas as additional hiding places. The corridor that had the potato for the least amount of time during the week-long event was declared the “winner” of the event. The @Clawsonpotato Twitter handle got created, so residents could “follow” the potato. The culminating event was a dinner – made exclusively of 10 potato-based recipes – which residents of the hall made for other residents. As one Clawson resident stated “This event truly demonstrated the possibilities for community engagement in our residence halls!”

Rinella Learning Center

  • Since the start of spring semester, the Rinella Learning Center has served over 400 students through individual tutoring for a total of 1,313 tutoring appointments. 
  • The Supplemental Instruction program has served 570 students for a total of almost 1,500 unique visits to supplemental instruction sessions; supplemental instruction targets courses that have a high fail and/or withdrawal rate.

Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership

  • Attendance at Late Night Miami events continues to increase. We have had over 5,560 students in attendance at events so far this Spring. Average attendance is 275 per event. The most popular and consistent with attendance are the movies, craft nights and coffee houses. We see smaller attendance numbers at student org sponsored events.

Student Counseling Service

  • The Student Counseling Service (SCS) received a $3,000 grant from the Eating Recovery Center, LLC, to support bringing The Body Project to Miami next year. The Body Project is an evidence-based, psycho-educational, peer-delivered program designed to assist students in developing healthy body image, self-esteem, and eating patterns. The grant will support training 8 staff to provide training and supervision to up to 12 student peer educators in providing the program to other Miami students.
  • SCS staff and the Suicide Prevention Team coordinated and collaborated with a wide range of university offices and student organizations to produce Stress Less Week, April 11-15. This week is filled with a variety of activities designed to provide students with information and experiences in developing and maintaining a healthy balance of stress and responsibility as well as how to develop and apply resilience and coping strategies in managing difficult emotions.

Student Wellness

  • BACCHUS, a student organization focused on health through the Office of Student Wellness, attended the Associated Student Government Green Beer Day Forum. Approximately 650 students engaged in an interactive presentation about social hosting responsibilities and awareness around high-risk drinking.
  • BACCHUS hosted a pancake breakfast from 6am-12pm on Green Beer Day. Over 300 students, staff and faculty visited the Student Wellness gazebo for breakfast and games. The purpose of this event was to remind students of legal, low-risk behaviors regarding alcohol consumption and to provide students with food and time as a risk reduction strategy. This was advertised as a Late Night Miami event.
  • Free HIV testing at the Office of Student Wellness was launched in March. This pilot project was co-sponsored with BACCHUS and the Ohio AIDS Resource Center. More dates are being planned for next academic year. 

Women’s Center

  • Patron Traffic: 900 visits to the Women's Center February through March
  • Eight programs sponsored or co-sponsored with a total attendance of 450. Among these programs were two signature events:
    • Celebrating Global Sisterhood, featuring student testimonials and the presentation of the Jennie Elder Suel Distinguished Woman of Color Award to two students and one alumna
    • "Makerspace," a collaboration with University Libraries focusing on the theme of creativity & innovation
  • Three of the eight programs, organized by the Miami Masculinities Committee, involved outreach to male students and focused on college men's identity development and creating healthy masculinities

Collaborative efforts

  • Student Wellness and the Cliff Alexander office worked together to present the Greeks Step Up! Bystander Intervention program to 1,436 new Greek members. Greeks Step UP! is a program that teaches the skills to intervene in problem situations safely and effectively. Topics such as hazing, alcohol poisoning, and sexual assault are discussed.
  • The Myaamiaki conference concluded with a Stomp Dance at the Armstrong Student Center as a Late Night Miami offering, cosponsored by Residence Life and the Center for American and World Cultures. Shawnee tribe members traveled from Oklahoma to perform. Many Myaamia current students and graduates got to participate in an authentic stomp dance for the first time.
  • During April approximately 400 students participated in Greek Spring Clean, a partnership between OCES and Cliff Alexander Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life.

Staff Achievements and Accomplishments

  • The Lavatus Powell Diversity Awards Banquet honored Chelsea Appiah with the Outstanding Student Diversity Award, Tammy Brown Faculty Diversity Award, Jacqueline Rioja Outstanding Staff Diversity Award and Gerald Yearwood Lifetime Achievement Award approximately 90 people attended the program.
  • Kathy Jicinsky (Assistant Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute) and Becky Carlson (Career Development Specialist at Saint Louis University) presented an educational session titled “Maximizing Student Learning and Career Readiness with High Impact Practices” at the 2016 NASPA Annual Conference in Indianapolis, Indiana on March 14.
  • Kathy Jicinsky, Assistant Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute, completed the 11-part Supervisor Development Series on March 8, 2016. This series is offered through Miami’s Human Resources Staff Development and is a curriculum-based program designed to develop essential skills to be a successful supervisor.
  • Dr. Eric Buller, Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute, also serves as the Vice President of the National Collegiate Boxing Association (NCBA) as well as the advisor and coach of the Miami University Boxing Club. From April 7 through 9, the club participated in the NCBA Collegiate Boxing National Championships earning three bronze medals and All-American designation status for three Miami boxers. Additionally, Dr. Buller was selected as the NCBA National Coach of the Year. 
  • Jane Goettsch has assumed the co-chair role of the Council on Diversity and Inclusion (CODI), a committee of University Senate.
  • The Orientation and Transition Programs team attended the regional conference of NODA: The Association for Orientation, Transition & Retention in Higher Education. We sent five total attendees: two professional staff members (Director Buffy Stoll Turton and Assistant Director Elizabeth Walsh), three graduate practicum students (Jaymee Heineke, Tricia Sherrard and MyTresa Taylor), and one of our two undergraduate student coordinators (Jordan Corral). Buffy and Elizabeth served on the conference planning committee, and each attendee also presented at the conference.
  • Dr. Vicka Bell-Robinson, Associate Director in Residence Life, completed her Ph.D. in Educational Leadership this semester. Her dissertation is entitled: Exploring the Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Dissent among College Student Organizational Leaders: A Mixed-Method Study.
  • Our Division was well represented as presenters at our two national student affairs conferences:
    • ACPA
      • Buffy Stoll Turton and Christina Carrubba-Whetstine: Holistically validating low-income and first-generation students: A reflective programming approach
      • Jayne Brownell: Want to Impact Your Division? Manage Up…Up…Up
    • NASPA
      • Kathy Jicinsky: Maximizing Student Learning and Career Readiness with High Impact Practices
      • Angie Cook: Effective Training Strategies Using Adult Learning Theory and the Learning Partnerships Model
      • Angie Cook: Your Own Path: Applying Learning Partnership Model to Advising Chinese International Students
      • Steven Sajkich, James Wu, and Sarah Thompson: Tell Me More: Inspiring Customer Service in a Developmental Student Affairs World
      • Stephen Henninger: Beyond the Survey: Integrating Assessment into New Professionals and Graduate Student Experiences
      • Katie Wilson: Exploring Research Opportunities from the College Union/Student Activities Lens
      • Jaymee Lewis-Flenaugh: The First 6 Months: Personal Foundations Toward Self Care in Job One
      • Gwen Fears: Creating a Common Department Review Cycle with Purpose
      • Jenn Phillips: Late to the Starting Line: Challenges to Fulfilling the RD Role as a Mid-year Hire

2015-16 - Fall and Winter Highlights (through January 29)

Armstrong Student Center

  • During the first two quarters of FY 2016 (summer/fall), Armstrong Student Center was the host location for 772 events. 632 of these events were organized by student organizations, 129 by university departments and 11 were non-university clients (employers, conference and weddings). This a 10 percent increase compared to the same time frame in FY 2015.
  • In January, the Ford Family Initiative for Spirituality, Meaning and Purpose, held a day and half strategic planning retreat with campus and community partners to develop learning outcomes and a strategic plan for interfaith and personal development initiatives related to the objectives of the gift. Work will continue on this plan throughout the semester.

Community Engagement and Service

  • $4,772.84 was collected during Hunger & Homelessness Awareness Week in November. Oxford Community Choice Pantry and the Oxford Homeless Coalition are the benefiting agencies.
  • 48 America Reads/Counts tutors worked 3,058 hours for the fall 2015 semester with community partners in College Corner, Hamilton, Middletown and Oxford, Ohio.
  • There are 50 Service-Learning courses on the Oxford campus for spring 2016. Total enrollment is 752. Enrollment in OCES coordinated courses is 295.

Diversity Affairs

  • The MLK Celebration was held at the Oxford Community Arts Center for the third time. The theme for this year's event was "Where are our Children? The Unspoken Dreams of African American Children," with keynote speaker Dr. Yvette Harris. Dr. Juanita Tate (recently retired) was honored by the Oxford NAACP for her countless years of contribution. 

  • On January 4th – January 11th 2016, ODA staff members, Shevonne Nelson and Yvania Garcia-Pusateri and SAHE graduate student Bria Howard led the 3rd Annual Office of Diversity Affairs Immersion Trip to San Francisco. Out of 43 applicants, 8 students were selected to participate to visit San Francisco to learn about “Asian Fusion” through the lens of the Asian Diaspora and its impact on the culture and identity of the city. Asian Fusion is defined as art, music, food, theater, film, architecture, photography, community, law, politics, education, health, technology/social media and tourism, etc. Additionally students learned about LGBTQ+ history during their time in the city and discussed the intersections between race/ethnicity and gender identity identity/sexuality. Students also met with 4 alumni to discuss these intersections and how their work relates as well their time at Miami. The alumni include:
    • Shefali Razadan Duggal ’93 (Political Activist and Fundraiser)
    • Hanrui “Hannah” Yang ’15 (Associate at First Republic Bank)
    • Amol Sogal ’03 (Mobile Product Management, EBATES)
    • Tony Chang ’02 (Software Engineer, Google)

Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute

  • The Wilks Leadership Institute hosted the second of four Wilks Leadership Workshops on November 15th. This workshop, Vision and Innovation, introduced students to the process of developing vision statements as part of a strategic planning process, challenged students in five different innovation stations followed by student vision statement presentations and a discussion on a TED Talk about leveraging limitations instead of being constrained by them.
  • The Miami Alpha Sigma Circle of Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK) held its fall induction ceremony on December 3rd. In the ceremony, 12 junior/senior students were recognized for their outstanding academic achievement and leadership in the five major phases as defined by ODK. Additionally, one staff member was inducted for his outstanding leadership and support of students.
  • The Institute provided a StrengthQuest Workshop for the newly re-formed HOME office. With the reorganization of several separate offices into the redesigned HOME office, this workshop benefited them by providing a means to getting to know one another better and to understand roles and associated talents and help to build the new team.
  • The Scholar Leader Community along with Marcy Miller (executive director of Miami University Hillel) collaborated to offer the 2016 Winter Immersion Service Experience (WISE) Trip to St. Louis, Missouri from January 20th-23rd. The WISE trip is an annual collaborative effort concentrated around the ideas of power, privilege, and social justice. This year, 27 undergraduates and 3 staff advisers participated in the trip - ranging from Scholar Leaders, Hillel, and Office of Community Engagement and Service.
  • Program Highlights of the Fall 2015 term:

    • 1,495 students attended a Wilks Leadership Institute Program
    • 608 students and staff attended a StrengthsQuest Workshop
    • 38 programs were offered by the Wilks Leadership Institute
    • 529 students joined Sigma Alpha Pi, the National Society of Leadership and Success
    • 73 students attended the Perlmutter Leadership Conference
    • 55 students are currently pursuing a co-curricular Leadership Certificate
    • 239 new followers on social media - #leadership

New Student Programs

We’ve just concluded a busy spring orientation season!

Transfer one-day orientations

For students entering in spring term 2016, New Student Programs (NSP) began collaborating with the College of Arts and Science (CAS) to expand the transfer advising days to one-day orientation sessions that introduce transfer students and their families to academic and student life at Miami. Sessions were capped at 12 students each. Informal feedback from students and families was very positive, and plans are proceeding to offer 10-15 similar sessions this summer for transfer students from all academic colleges.

Transfer one-day orientation numbers:

  • 5 total transfer orientations, spanning mid-December 2015 to mid-January 2016
  • 36 total students attended (all five sessions)
  • 31 total family/guests attended (all five sessions)

In addition to CAS, collaborative partners included the HOME Office, One Stop for Student Success Services, Student Success Center, Study Abroad, Office of Diversity Affairs, Office of Community Engagement and Service, Off-Campus Outreach & Communication, Office of Parent and Family Programs, and the Dean of Students Office.

Relocation orientation

New students who were relocating from one of Miami’s regional campuses were invited to attend an orientation session designed specifically for relocation students on Tuesday evening, January 19, 2016, which drew nearly 50 attendees. This attendance hit an all-time high, which reinforced NSP’s decision from August 2015 to offer relocation orientation separately from orientations for other new students. Attendees met other new relocation students/families; went on a campus tour; received information on parking, transportation, and campus navigation; learned Oxford campus acronyms, traditions, and vocabulary; and participated in a range of workshops and campus visits.

Relocation orientation numbers:

  • 27 total students attended
  • 22 total family/guests attended

Collaborative partners included the One Stop for Student Success Services, Student Success Center, Off-Campus Outreach & Communication, CAS Advising, and the Dean of Students Office.

January orientation

In collaboration with International Student and Scholar Services, NSP concluded our spring term orientation season with our two-day January orientation, attended by both international and domestic first-year and transfer students.

January orientation numbers:

  • 199 total students attended

    • 123 international students (44 first-year, 13 transfer, 51 ACE program, 15 exchange)
    • 76 domestic students (59 transfer, 17 first-year)
  • 75 family/guests attended

Off-Campus Outreach & Communication

  • Hosted second event in the Commuter Center during finals with about 20 participants
  • Met individually with 8 Oxford property managers to better understand their experiences with Miami students and develop ways to collaborate on creating smoother experiences for students transitioning to off-campus living. 

Parent and Family Programs

  • The Parents Council partnered with the Alumni Association to encourage all Miami alumni in CEO/President/Founder roles of organizations to begin recruiting at Miami for full time and internship positions. 

Residence Life

  • Over 280 new applicants applied for the Resident Assistant position for the 2016-17 academic year. Returner applications close at the end of January. We anticipate over 100 current staff to apply to return to the position. Group and individual interviews take place in early February.

  • Over 30 active Eco Reps served on individual Community Leadership Teams to promote sustainability in the residence halls and at Miami University. Five Trash Audits were conducted where trash was weighed before recyclable materials were separated. Results were e-mailed to residents of the halls audited.

  • A new on-line tracking and accountability system was implemented for Resident Assistants to use to communicate with residents after their 1 on 1 meetings and to make notes at the end of the semester. Over 4800 individual e-mail messages were sent to residents from their RA. Over 10,800 notes were submitted to the system. In the 2015 Assessment of Living and Learning survey, 91.9% of respondents (n=3840) responded that they had at least one 1 on 1 meeting with their RA, as compared to 84.9% in 2014 and 83.0% in 2013.

  • In the Fall 2015, ORL staff:

    • implemented more than 430 late night and weekend programs to provide students with non-alcoholic activity alternatives. Attendance was over 6000. 
    • offered more than 1,500 programs/initiatives/events that support the four goals of the Residential Curriculum (academic success, cultural competency, interpersonal development, and community development) and Living Learning Community goals.
    • conducted 678 meetings with students to talk with them about their conduct in the residence halls and on campus.
    • responded to 262 crisis, emergency and mental health situations.
    • resolved over 250 roommate conflicts using a variety of tools and strategies including the Roommate Agreement, mediation, one on one meetings, parent conversations, voluntary moves, and, in some cases, administrative reassignment of students.
    • taught 46 course sections including but not limited to EDL301, UNV101, and EDL290.
    • provided 342 hours of in-hall training to resident assistants on a variety of topics including cultural competency, crisis management, and community building. The staff also provided 190 hours of in-hall training and development to Community Leadership Team student leaders on topics including programming skills, time management, and diversity.

Rinella Learning Center

  • The Rinella Learning Center (RLC) served 799 students through tutoring and 710 students through supplemental instruction during fall semester. For both programs the total student visits over the course of the semester was 6,353. 

  • For fall semester, the RLC Testing Center proctored 1,436 exams.

  • 439 students were served through Rinella’s Academic Support Services (Academic Counseling, Coaching, and/or Study Strategies Course) and 257 students attended one or more of Rinella’s Study Strategies Workshops.

Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership

  • Semester end attendance data from Late Night Miami was compiled and we had a total of 29,404 students at 45 events for the semester. We are excited about our Spring Schedule, which was just released. We have over 50 Late Night Miami programs planned for spring 2016. 

  • Sorority Recruitment numbers have increased this year. We have over 100 more women signed up for recruitment than in the past years. 

  • Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) has returned to campus and received formal recognition in December of 2015. Sigma Chi Fraternity will be returning to campus Spring of 2016. 

  • We have created a new program called Catalyst, a one day leadership development program for student leaders in Greek Life and Miami Activities and Programming (MAP). We have over 100 students attending that program on January 23rd. 

  • The HUB, our database and general system for student organization management, has increased users and total sessions. A total session is the actual times students have accessed the HUB. In 2014 we had 56,287 visits and in 2015 we had 72,091 visits for a 28% increase in visits to the hub.

  • MAP and Late Night Miami won 2 awards at the National Campus Activities Association Annual Conference: Best Advertising Award and Best Themed Publicity Award. 

Student Counseling Service

  • Solicited and successfully matched with a psychiatric resident from Wright State School of Medicine to provide 8 hrs/wk of supplemental psychiatric service in exchange for training and supervision.

  • Almost 500 students attended Furry Finals sessions in which therapy dogs are available to help calm students studying for finals.

  • Over 1,500 new students completed the at Risk mental health gatekeeper training program on-line as part of the UNV101 course, educating themselves about how to recognize when they or a peer may be in need of mental health services and how to refer self or peers for professional assistance. 

  • Mid-year statistics show that in the Student Counseling Service:

    • The shift from 50 to 30 minute initial consultation (IC) sessions to increase the availability of brief assessment of service requestors, resulted in:

      • 28% increase in students receiving clinical services over same period last year;
      • 12% increase in number of individual counseling or psychiatric appointments;
      • 35% increase in students receiving clinical services for the first time;
      • 58% decrease in number of emergency sessions required during office hours;
      • Elimination of wait list for initial consultation: all requestors received appointment within 1-3 days of contact;
      • Reduction in average wait time for on-going individual counseling from 22 days to 13 days.
    • The intentional shift of resources to significantly increase the variety and number of group workshops to teach commonly needed basic skills in stress and anxiety management, resiliency, concentration and focus, and depression response, resulted in:
      • 37% increase in number of group/workshop sessions offered;
      • 48% increase in number of group/workshop appointments completed. 

Women’s Center

  • Patron traffic for November-December was 888 (the December BOT Good News Report included patron traffic for September-October).

  • The Women's Center stayed open late (5-9 pm) Monday-Wednesday of finals week; 28 patron visits were recorded during these hours.

  • The Women's Center, Office of Student Wellness, and GLBTQ Services collaborated to sponsor an observance of World AIDS Day (Dec. 1) with free and confidential HIV testing at the Women's Center (32 students took part) and a panel discussion about HIV/AIDS in the evening (23 students attended).

Staff Achievements and Accomplishments

  • Rhonda Jackson from the Women’s Center assumed the co-presidency of the 1809 LGBT Alumni Group in May 2015.

  • Shane Haney and Sharon Kootin-Sanwu, two of Wilks student employees, were selected as recipients of the 2015 Honor Code Honoree Award through the Farmer School of Business. Twelve students were award recipients in 2015. This award recognizes exemplary students who embody the three pillars of the Honor Code: Integrity, Respect, and Responsibility. 

  • Jenny Levering, Director of Student Activities and the Cliff Alexander Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life, received the Sue Kraft Fusell Distinguished Service Award for the National Association of Fraternity and Sorority Advisors in December. 

  • Graham Arledge, HAWKS Peer Health Educator, presented "The Flourishing Classroom: Nurturing Positive Mental Health in Our Students and Ourselves", based on the HAWKS #FlourishMiami Initiative, at the National Council of Teachers of English Language Arts (Annual Convention) in Minneapolis, MN. Graham adapted the concepts around college students and positive mental health to the high school classroom for both teachers and students.

  • NSP staff (Assistant Director Liz Walsh and Director Buffy Stoll Turton) are serving on the conference planning committee for the upcoming regional conference of NODA: The Association for Orientation, Transition & Retention in Higher Education. With support from the MU Family Fund, Liz and Buffy will attend the conference on February 27 in Indianapolis with three graduate practicum students and two undergraduate student coordinators.

  • NSP Director Buffy Stoll Turton has recently been named to the research committee of NODA: The Association for Orientation, Transition & Retention in Higher Education. This national group supports the research mission of NODA as a professional association.

  • Nine students and 2 ORL professional staff traveled to the Central Atlantic Association of College and University Residence Halls (CAACURH) conference in Washington DC. Members of the delegation were awarded for Outstanding Spirit (2nd place) and two Top-Ten Conference Sessions.

2015 - Fall Highlights (through November 16)

Community Engagement and Service

  • The September Service Saturday occurred on September 26. 32 Miami students participated by volunteering during Hike-A-Thon, Medication Take Back Day, and the Hamilton Community OktoberFest at Mt. Zion Church.
  • 48 reading and math tutors were hired through the America Reads/Counts work study program for the fall semester. These students are serving at 13 local schools and after-school sites.
  • 40 students registered for weekly education-focused volunteer placements through the Adopt a School program.
  • There are 18 Service-Learning courses offered on the Oxford Campus for fall 2015. There are 328 students enrolled in non-fee-assessed courses and 393 students enrolled in fee-assessed courses. Students in fee-assessed courses are serving at 25 local agencies.
  • 36 students attended Interfaith Day of Service on October 23. Students engaged in service at three sites: Family Resource Center, the Interfaith Center and Woodland Country Manor. This event is possible by funding from the Ford Family Initiative for Spirituality, Meaning and Purpose and partnership with the Interfaith Center.
  • The October Service Saturday occurred on October 24. 101 Miami students participated by planting tulips for Coalition for a Healthy Community – Oxford Area. The event was called Plant the Promise.
  • The Office of Community Engagement and Service coordinated and facilitated an Urban Plunge in Over the Rhine in Cincinnati, November 6-7. 7 students and 2 staff members attended Urban Plunge. Students volunteered with the Cincinnati Homeless Coalition, Peaslee Community Center, Wesley Chapel Mission Center and Upspring a nonprofit that works with homeless youth.

Diversity Affairs

  • The Office of Diversity Affairs coordinated the Cultural Connections Dinner on October 4. The theme for this year’s event was "Connections Where We See Boundaries". Students, faculty, and staff participated in table discussions and personal interactions.
  • The 4th Annual Multicultural Student Leadership Conference took place on November 6-7. The theme was centered around "Finding Your Voice" and the keynote speaker is Tish Norman.
  • The MIX-IT-UP Luncheon was held on October 27. Discussion centered around diversity issues.

Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute

  • Sixty-five Miami students participated in the annual Perlmutter Leadership Conference on October 3, Strengths-based leadership conference during which they attended StrengthsQuest™ sessions, participated in two 45-minute leadership workshops, and engaged in a small group reflection session. As a result of attendance at the conference, 100% of these students can identify ways to develop their top 5 StrengthsQuest signature themes into strengths.
  • 54 Miami students are enrolled in the first offering of the Wilks Leadership Certificate Program. This year-long co-curricular certificate program is designed to provide a broad perspective of leadership theories and opportunities to learn about and practice leadership. It also requires significant self-reflection and ultimately the creation of a personal leadership philosophy. A group of participants are also serving as an Advisory Committee to guide the improvement of the design and implementation with hopes of growing the program in its second year. Any student that completes the certificate becomes eligible to continue their leadership journey as a Leadership Fellow which is an individualized and mentored leadership competencies-based program.

Myaamia Tribe Relations

  • There are 25 Myaamia students enrolled on the Oxford campus and receiving the Heritage Award.
  • The Myaamia Center/Miami Tribe Relations hosted an overnight session for the Myaamia students on September 4 at the WRA Cabin. The evening began with dinner and continued with indoor Myaamia games and using the Myaamia language in simply ways during the games. Students who had been counselors at the summer Eewansaapita youth camps were leaders in the small groups. The satisfaction level about this event was very high. All seven 1st year students report that it helped eliminate the intimidation they felt in the two class sessions that occurred before the overnight. Plans are now underway for a similar event at the beginning of 2nd semester.
  • It is typical for a community pot-luck dinner to be hosted by Daryl & Karen Baldwin at their home at some point during the school year. This year the event occurred on Saturday, November 7. What was not typical was the student participation—22 of the 28 students attended. One person brought her parents who were visiting for the weekend and two others brought weekend guests. It was a delightful evening and encourages us to offer more informal ways for interaction within this group.
  • There have been 16 inquiries from Myaamia high school students about applying to Miami for 2016-17. It is likely that 13 of them will actually apply. That is the largest group of interested students to date. Eight of these interested students attended a Bridges session. We were able to meet up with all of them at the lunch that concludes the program.
  • The Myaamia Center is actively engaged in connecting Myaamia students with others in Indian Country for possible summer internships.
  • Three Myaamia students are team members who are working with Bob Keller, Physical Facilities Planning and Design Manager, on an outdoor educational art project about the Miami Tribe and the relationship with Miami University.

New Student Programs

  • Recruitment for Student Orientation Undergraduate Leaders (SOULs) is in full swing! Applications opened in early October. The office’s two undergraduate student orientation coordinators (who were SOULs for orientation 2015) are leading a range of recruitment efforts. Facebook page statistics tell us that weekly facebook activity is reaching nearly 2,500 people per week. The application deadline is in late January; recruitment continues through the start of the spring semester.
  • New Student Programs held the first-ever SOUL Homecoming Reunion Brunch on September 19. Approximately 25 former SOULs attended the event, connected with one another, and enjoyed a meal and slideshow of SOUL memories. The program was the latest in a series of SOUL alumni communications and events begun in spring 2015.

Off-Campus Outreach & Communication

  • Created Commuter Center Assistant position to support the Commuter Center, and hired two students to serve in this role for the 2015-2016 year.
  • Presented a divisional professional development session on Digital Leadership for Student Affairs Staff.
  • Started an Instagram account for the Division of Student Affairs (@MiamiOH_StudentLife).
  • Received grant from Parent Fund to purchase 1,000 safety timers, to be provided to off-campus students for free as part of the second Oxford Walkabout (November 2015). 

Parent and Family Programs

  • Family Weekend (October 16-18) occurred with overwhelmingly positive feedback from attendees. Many events reported higher than expected attendance. Debuted a mobile guide to the weekend (Guidebook), which received positive reviews, including easier wayfinding during the weekend, an increased understanding of what to expect during the weekend, and better knowledge of events, activities, and restaurants, both on-campus and in the surrounding area.
  • Parents Council held fall meeting (October 16-17) and welcomed 9 new families to the Council, representing the Class of 2019. The Council reported that 28 new companies are committed to or considering recruiting at Miami as a result of Parents Council members’ efforts. The Council also partnered with the Office of Student Wellness to create the first in a series of videos to engage parents in conversations with students about alcohol use during college. 

Residence Life

  • 5,048 1:1 meetings have occurred with students and their RAs since the start of fall semester.
  • 94 events have been sponsored by Community Leadership Teams and the Residence Hall Association since September 1.
  • 525 residence hall students are serving on Community Leadership Teams within the residence halls.

Rinella Learning Center

  • Through mid-November, the Rinella Learning Center has served 1,439 students through tutoring and/or supplemental instruction for a total of 5,167 unique visits.
  • Proctored over 1,000 exams since September 1 totaling over 1,230 hours of test proctoring.
  • The Rinella Learning Center staff will be teaching a new course (EDP 122: Academic Success II) in spring 2016 designed to support students as they reenter the Miami University following academic suspension.

Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership

  • Partnered with the Performing Arts Series and had over 6,000 people in attendance at Seth Myers for Family Weekend.
  • Late Night Miami is seeing an increase in numbers of students showing up to events. Friday night movies are averaging 250-300 people showing up on most weekends. Thursday night coffee houses are averaging 100 people showing up on Thursday evenings and all other programs average 150-200 students. Overall the program has had huge success in its first semester of implementation.
  • 90 Fraternity and Sorority Emerging Leaders attended Acropolis, a three day leadership development retreat for future leaders.
  • Both lecture series events, Black Lives Matter and Pete Rose, were sold out.
  • 500 Students and Families attended the first annual Go Greek Tailgate during Family Weekend.
  • Created a new partnership with Global Buddies and the International Student Scholars program for promoting Late Night Miami to international students.
  • Best Buddies Student Organization won their #1 Chapter in the Country Award.
  • Just Duet a capella group was selected to perform at Carnegie Hall in the spring. 

Student Counseling Service

  • The new intake/triage procedures in Student Counseling Service contributed to a 63% increase in the number of new clients and a 13% increase in the overall number of individual counseling sessions provided in the first month of the fall semester vs. last year. These procedures have also been instrumental in eliminating a wait time for an initial appointment as all requests for initial appointments have been granted within a working day or two of the request. While a wait list for on-going individual counseling sessions was begun October 16, this was 3-4 weeks later in the semester than any year in the past decade.
  • Over 400 students took advantage of the very popular "Dog days at Mid-terms" in which pet therapy dogs are made available as a study break for students during mid-term week.
  • 20 faculty and staff completed an 8-hr long training in Mental Health First Aid offered by SCS staff on October 9, making them eligible to become Mental Health Allies on campus.

Student Disability Services

  • Students with Disabilities Advocacy Council (SDAC) was founded in the fall of 2015, SDAC is open to any student registered with SDS and has been designed with three main goals: 1.) Students will be able to connect the experiences of others in relation to their own, and situate any differences and similarities within their development process; 2.) Students will conceptualize for themselves what it means to be a student with a disability at Miami University; 3.) Students will re-conceptualize for themselves what it means to be a “successful” student.
    • Additional expectations for the group include:
      • Providing feedback to the SDS Leadership Team with regards to campus concerns and issues facing students with disabilities
      • Assisting in identifying topics for programming, and assist with the implantation of programming;
      • Participating in student centered initiatives across campus representing SDS.
    • SDAC student-led initiatives for 2015-16 include:
      • Bi-monthly meetings
      • Peer mentoring
      • Alumni networking
      • Mentoring for prospective students – Admissions partnership
      • Faculty/student relationship building
      • Social events

Student Wellness and Education

  • The HAWKS Peer Health Educators received recognition as an Outstanding Peer Education Group and the Step Up! Bystander Intervention program received the Outstanding Program award from the BACCHUS Initiatives of NASPA at the annual BACCHUS conference. The conference brings together peer education teams at universities across the country for professional development opportunities and to showcase effective programs.
  • The Step Up! Bystander Intervention program was successfully implemented with over 1,200 students in the UNV 101 course.
  • Our BACCHUS chapter had their first event with the new wellness gazebo called "The Big O"- Opportunities for Health and Wellness. Launching their premiere on October 29 with Health-O-Ween and Health Jeopardy, 125 students visited the gazebo which created opportunities for education and sexual health resources. Free food and goodies were also provided. 

Women’s Center

  • The Women's Center has received approximately 25 requests from Residence Life Assistants for pre-made bulletin boards for residence halls.
  • Three new bulletin boards have been created for the hallway outside the Women's Center - one on the women's suffrage movement, one on the cultural and gender implications of Halloween costumes, and one highlighting the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.
  • The Clothesline Project was held at the Hub September 30-October 2. Eighteen new t-shirts were created by survivors and allies, 22 students volunteered to staff the event, almost 2,400 information cards were distributed, and 40 attended the closing ceremony. The Women's Center also assisted the Hamilton Campus Clothesline Project by providing t-shirts for their display.
  • Approximately 240 students attended six collaborative programs held September 1-November 3:
    • Rainbow Reception and Pumpkin Pride (co-sponsored with GLBTQ Services),
    • Two gathering for Middle Eastern Women (co-sponsored with Global Initiatives),
    • Two free and anonymous HIV testing days at the Women's Center (co-sponsored with Spectrum),
    • A screening and discussion of "The Mask You Live In". This is a film about masculinity in America (co-sponsored with Student Wellness),
    • A networking event for women students with alumnae (co-sponsored with Career Services).
  • A new Masculinities at Miami Facebook page was launched in mid-September.
  • A weekly Friday workshop series focusing on wellness launched at the Women's Center in November.
  • There were approximately 830 patron visits to the Women's Center in September-October.

Collaborative Efforts

  • Office of Community Engagement and Service partnered with the Department of Housing and Residence Life, Oxfam, Family Resource Center of Oxford, the Creative Writing Department, Empty Bowls, and The Diversity Affairs Council to put on Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. Throughout the week 7 large bags of clothes were donated, 766 meals were donated and $4,703.24 was raised for the Homeless Coalition and the Oxford Food Pantry.
  • Office of Community Engagement and Service hosted a SEAL Workshop titled “Community Engagement and Your Organization” through the Office of Student Activities on October 14.
  • For the first time, New Student Programs is collaborating with the College of Arts and Science to offer an early transfer orientation. For many years, the College of Arts and Science has hosted several transfer advising sessions for those transfers who are able to travel to campus in December and early January. These sessions have been historically limited to academic advising and registration, and held prior to New Student Program’s comprehensive January orientation program. This year, New Student Programs and the College of Arts and Science are working together to provide a full orientation opportunity to these transfer students and their families at each of the five College of Arts and Science advising dates. The program has been expanded to include student life information, resources from Parent & Family Programs, and a campus tour. New Student Programs is also managing program registration. Students who attend one of the College of Arts and Science advising days will not need to attend January orientation, but will be invited to enroll in a transfer-specific transition course, and to attend the transfer student social at the start of the semester.
  • Student Counseling Service collaborated with the Psychology Department, Office of Student Wellness, and three mental health-related student organizations to produce a very successful second annual Suicide Prevention Week, October 12 through October 16. Highlights included a presentation on positive psychology and resilience; a one-woman performance of her comedic play on her experience with suicidal depression; and an extremely well-attended (over 600 students) "Relax-a-thon" with 12 stations of activities and information related to mental health and wellness.
  • The Office of Off-Campus Outreach and Communication proposed and implemented, with Associated Student Government, the Off-Campus Relations Committee, a new committee of all 16 off-campus student senators to address issues of health and safety, town-gown relations, and living in Oxford. They designed and produced "Break Safety" door hangers for senators to distribute to off-campus residences in November.
  • As part of the Ford Family Initiative for Spirituality, Meaning and Purpose, Miami University hosted a campus visit and keynote with Dr. Eboo Patel, CEO and Founder of Interfaith Youth Core. The events of the day included meetings with students, graduate students and a faculty and staff development session in addition to a keynote and book signing. The keynote was entitled "Engaging Faith, Non-Faith and Philosophical Diversity in the 21st Century." The events of the day were attended by over 400 people.

Staff Achievements and Accomplishments

  • Dr. Joshua Hersh, University Psychiatrist, was invited to contribute to the blog of the Higher Education Center's website. His blog, entitled "Using Minimum abuse/Maximum Care Treatment Algorithms to Decrease Prescription Drug Abuse on Campus" will appear as the October blog post.
  • Jane Goettsch, Director of the Women's Center, received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the National Women's Studies Association Women's Centers Pre-Conference on November 12.
  • Kathy Jicinsky (Assistant Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute) and Shamika Karikari (Doctoral Associate in Career Services) presented an educational session titled Supervision: A Professional Development and Learning-Centered Approach at the 2015 NASPA Region IV-East Conference in Schaumburg, Illinois on November 9.
  • New Student Programs graduate practicum student, Sarah Dodge, a second-year in the Student Affairs in Higher Education (SAHE) program, received the Norman K. Russell Scholarship at the national conference for NODA: The Association for Orientation, Transition & Retention in Higher Education. The conference was held in Denver, Colorado, in late October. Dodge was one of three recipients of this national prize, given for excellence at the graduate level in the field of Orientation, Transition & Retention.
  • New Student Programs Director Buffy Stoll Turton gave a webinar in late September to GLACUHO: The Great Lakes Association of College and University Housing Officers. The webinar, titled, First Generation Success Stories: Navigating Tension between Home and School at a Four-Year Institution, focused on Stoll Turton’s dissertation research
  • Hoa Bui, Assistant Resident Director, Dodds Hall, received the Robert F. Rodgers Graduate Student of the Year Award from the Ohio College Personnel Association
  • Vicka Bell-Robinson, Associate Director of Residence Life, has been selected as a faculty member for the 2016 Professional Development Institute, annually sponsored by GLACUHO (Great Lakes Association of College and University Housing Officers), to be held in February, 2016.
  • Jaymee Lewis-Flenaugh, Resident Director, presented 3 programs at the 2015 NASPA IV-East conference, held recently in Schaumburg, IL: “The First 6 months: Personal Foundations toward Self-Care in Job One”, “We are the NOW of NASPA: Becoming Involved as a Young Professional or Graduate Student”, and “The Struggle is Real: Navigating Racial Battle Fatigue as an #SAGrad or New Professional of Color”.
  • Several residence life staff members presented at the GLACUHO conference in Flint, MI:
    • Sarah Meaney, Assistant Director: “Creating Happiness Beyond Your Job”, “Navigating Non-Traditional Mid-Level Positions”, and “’What are they thinking?!”’ Understanding and Preparing Yourself for Mid-Level Decision Making”
    • Vicka Bell-Robinson, Associate Director, and Sasha Masoomi, Assistant Director: “Risk Management – Expectations for Mid-Level Managers”
    • Jaymee Lewis-Flenaugh, Resident Director: “Pricing People into Segregation Social Justice in Residential Facilities”
    • Kyleen Ammerman, Assistant Director : “Renovate Advising: How to Advise a Student Advisor”
    • Colleen Bunn, Assistant Director: “Personal Connections in a Residential Curriculum: The Use of 1:1 Conversations to Further Learning”
    • Colleen Bunn, Assistant Director of Residence Life, presented a poster session at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference, held recently in Milwaukee, WI, entitled “Running Against the Media: Anger and the Feminist Killjoy” 

2015 - Summer Highlights (through September 1)

Armstrong Student Center

  • ​Armstrong Student Center hosted a successful Armstrong Palooza, welcoming new students to their student center. A feature of this year's event was "Taste of Armstrong" with free food samples at every food venue. Entertainment included a mentalist, glow golf, laser tag, entertainment by over 20 student organizations, and a DJ in the Bicentennial Rotunda.

Community Engagement and Service

  • OCES coordinated a service project for the Wilks U-Lead pre-semester program. 35 U-Lead participants were transported to Hueston Woods State Park to help with clean-up.

  • We provided service opportunities and transportation for the annual Wilks Scholar Leaders retreat on August 21, 2015. Over 70 students volunteered in the Oxford community in the morning. In the afternoon, OCES staff led a reflection session about their service and creating meaningful action.

Disability Resources

  • Student Disability Services (SDS) has launched a new electronic case management system. Students Accessing Miami, or SAM, can be accessed at the SDS website (www.MiamiOH.edu/SDS) and will allow students to apply for accommodations, upload disability documentation, request faculty notification letters, schedule testing services, and receive important office updates. SAM will also allow SDS staff to manage caseloads, provide reports, and assess key performance indicators for the office and division.

  • SDS will also be founding a new Student Advisory Group this fall. This group will consist of 6-10 students registered with SDS from a variety of disability backgrounds and will meet with SDS staff regularly to discuss programs and initiatives throughout the year. This group will also play a key role in the SDS program review as well.

Diversity Affairs

  • 226 new students attended the Made@Miami Program on August 18 – 20, prior to Welcome Week. This is the largest number of students the program has ever hosted. It was also the most diverse group we’ve had: 
    African American/Black (42),Indian American (5), African International (2), Middle Eastern International, Pakistani (2), Arab/Middle Eastern (1), Multi-Racial (2), Asian International, Chinese (57), Native American (3), Asian International, Japanese (2), South Asian International, Bangladeshi (2), Asian International, Mongolian (1), White/Caucasian (55), Asian International, Nepalese (1), Unknown/Did not disclose (2), Asian International, Vietnamese (2), Asian American (7), Bi-Racial (9), European International, Luxembourgish (1), Latino/Hispanic (19), Indian International (11).

Harry T. Wilks Leadership Institute

  • Twenty-five incoming Miami University first-year students participated in the 2015 U-Lead Adventure from August 17-20. This program is a 4-day interactive retreat experience hosted by the Wilks Leadership Institute. U-Lead challenges students to learn about leadership through small group sessions, participate in a low and high ropes course, engage in a service project, build community with peers and upperclass facilitators, and investigate opportunities at Miami and within Oxford.

  • The 2015 Scholar Leader Retreat was held August 20th-22nd. Seventy-four Miami University students participated in this 3-day, transformational leadership experienced focused on building community and setting them up for success in this unique Living Learning Community.

  • The kick-off Lessons in Leadership event of the year was held during Welcome Week on Tuesday, August 25th. Over 50 Miami students and community members attended a session facilitated by Coach Blasi from Miami Hockey.

  • The Wilks Leadership Institute is offering, for the first time, a co-curricular leadership certificate program. This is a one-year program open to any student and includes several leadership, diversity and service oriented activities that must be completed. Completion of the Leadership Certificate Program represents eligibility for the Wilks Fellows Program which will launch next year. The Fellows Program is a multi-year individualized and mentored experience that will focus on student leadership competencies.

Myaamia Tribe Relations

  • To date 13 Myaamia high school seniors have inquired about applying to Miami for 2016-17. Several have already applied to the Bridges Program.

  • Steps are being taken to ask returning students to assist with building a stronger Myaamia community among the Tribal students on campus, particularly focusing on welcoming and assimilating the incoming students into the group as quickly as possible.

  • An overnight is scheduled for Friday, September 4 to allow for fun social activities together hopefully reducing any intimidation that 1st year students might be feeling after two class meetings with the full group. This is an ongoing project to be extended throughout the year.

  • A Myaamia broomball team is being organized and more than 15 students have signed up to participate.

  • One student was a SOUL during Summer 2015. He was selected to be one of the two orientation coordinator positions for Summer Orientation for the 2015-16 year.

  • Seven students were camp counselors at one or both of the week long Eewansaapita Summer Language Programs in Miami, Oklahoma or Fort Wayne, Indiana.

  • One rising senior was a summer intern for the Miami Tribe and was assigned to work directly with Myaamia Center activities during the summer. He spent two weeks in Washington DC assisting with the logistics for the National Breath of Life Indigenous Language Revitalization program, attended both Eewansaapita camps, spent two weeks participating in archeological projects with a Miami Tribe colleague of another Tribe, and ended the experience with two weeks in St Paul, Minnesota with a law firm that specializes in Native American law.

  • This brings the total of enrolled Myaamia students since 1991 to 109.

New Student Programs

  • Summer orientation concluded on July 1. NSP staff worked to expand capacity of our sessions this summer to accommodate the larger class of new students with our normal 16 sessions of summer orientation. 3,460 students and 4,922 family/guests attended. As expected, numbers were up – from 3,333 students and 3,748 family/guests in 2014.

  • August orientation was held on August 19-20 for first-year students who could not attend a summer session, as well as new transfer students. 109 first-years and 105 transfer students attended (about the same as last year, which was 111 and 101, respectively). We also hosted 238 total family/guests (up from 188 last year). NSP also hosted a separate, redesigned orientation for relocation students on August 25, which was attended by 13 students and 3 guests.

  • The new orientation mobile app was a major success, with 5,169 total downloads (including 2,360 during Welcome Week alone). The app helped new students and families navigate orientation AND Welcome Week with schedules, maps, and other helpful program information. The app also meant that Welcome Week got a little greener by not printing a paper schedule.

  • Welcome Week 2015 offered 137 total programs coordinated by over 40 departments across campus. Student attendance was high and the major events went smoothly. New features included an ice show at the Goggin as part of the First Night Block Party, a spoken word poet who addressed topics of diversity, and a weekend tour of downtown Cincinnati (a collaboration with an MU alum through Downtown Cincinnati, Inc.). Attendance numbers are currently being collected; total combined attendance is expected to be well over 60,000.

  • The first-ever SOUL Homecoming Reunion is planned for Saturday, September 19th. NSP looks forward to welcoming SOUL alumni back to campus for this inaugural event, and further strengthening our alumni connections.

Off-Campus Outreach & Communication

  • We provided a resource table for commuter students at Summer Orientation for the first time, making contact with nearly all the incoming first year commuter students.

  • The office made upgrades to the Commuter Center, including the addition of a charging station, free locks and a locker-signup system, and the removal of the temporary walls of the grad assistant office to open up the space. We hosted our first event in the space on August 25, with 50 commuters in attendance.

  • We have been working on improving many web sites for Student Affairs departments, including improving accessibility. We also built new websites for Late Night Miami (www.miamioh.edu/latenightmiami), University Lecture Series (www.miamioh.edu/lecture), and convocation.

Parent and Family Programs

  • Parent & Family Programs coordinated New Student Send Offs for incoming students and families in Atlanta, Kansas City, Long Island, and the Twin Cities. Attendees connected with each other, as well as current parents, students, and recent alumni. 

  • Parent & Family Programs partnered with New Student Programs to orient over 4,900 family members of incoming first-year students. 

  • The Parents Council coordinated an effort to increase the number of employers recruiting at Miami by asking Miami parents in targeted geographic locations to encourage their organization to consider recruiting at Miami. This included the parents of over 800 current Miami students from: Los Angeles to San Diego, Portland to Seattle, Denver, Atlanta, and Boston to Washington, DC. 

  • Parents Council also worked closely with the Office of Student Wellness to prepare a video that engages parents and family members in efforts to prevent alcohol overconsumption and sexual and interpersonal violence. 

Residence Life

  • 88.4%, or 3645, of first year students participated in the Great Escape, our fire safety program where they navigate through a theatrical-smoke filled corridor followed by group discussions led by ORL staff about the experience. Students then are led in small groups to four sites where there receive information about the Oxford fire department, MUPD, previous fires at Miami & other nearby universities, and a fire extinguisher demonstration. The HAWKS Peer Educators gave out information about the “It’s on Us” campaign. ORL collaborates with Miami’s Department of Environmental Health & Safety, Miami U. Police Department, and the City of Oxford Fire Department.

  • We have 328 students living in off-campus apartments this year due to the increased size of the first year class. 12 RAs and a full-time RD have been hired to staff these facilities, raising the total number of RAs in the system to 246.

  • 41% of residential students moved in early, which equates to approximately 3175 students. Emerson Hall was opened on Wednesday, which significantly alleviated the traffic concerns due to the construction just south of campus.

  • 8 students affiliated with RHA (Residence Hall Association) attended the national conference for residence hall student leadership, held in in Grand Forks, ND.

  • First Year Communities had 3000 students and 18 external office stakeholders attend LLC kick-offs during Welcome Week. Second Year Communities had 1300 students and 5 external office stakeholders attend LLC kick-offs during Welcome Week.

  • There have been 3655 viewings of the ORL-produced video to assist students and family members for move-in. It can be viewed at www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dOHUQOj3fE.

  • As part of the late night programming initiatives being done by ORL this year, over 175 students attended the first e-gaming program: League of Legends round-robin tournament, held in Stonebridge Hall on the Friday of the first week of classes.

Student Activities and Cliff Alexander Fraternity and Sorority Life and Leadership

  • Over 450 students from student organizations and fraternities and sororities volunteered to assist with first year student move in resulting in positive feedback from first year students and their parents about how smooth the move in process was for families this year. 

  • The Office of Student Activities launched a comprehensive Late Night Programming Schedule for the Fall Semester. Events range from entertainment events in the Armstrong Student Center to Late Night Movies outside on campus. The overall schedule and website launched the first week of classes.

  • The Office of Student Activities hosted Welcome Fest, a concert for Miami Students on the first Saturday of Classes/Move in Weekend. 3500 students were in attendance. 

  • The Office of Student Activities hosted Mega Fair. An opportunity for over 500 student organizations to come together to promote their organizations. 5,000 students were in attendance. 

  • Chi Psi Fraternity and Tau Kappa Epsilon each won the top chapter of the year awards this summer at their national conventions. 

Student Counseling Service

  • Student Counseling Service (SCS) welcomed staff filling two new newly added positions: a Case Manager position designed to provide critical assistance in helping students complete effective mental health service referrals off campus and proper placement of those needing services on campus and to assist in response and management of students experiencing mental health crises (eg. hospitalizations, etc); and a Prevention Specialist position to provide vision and implementation for the recently adopted public health approach to primary prevention and suicide prevention within the SCS. In addition to those specialty areas, both maintain a full load of student counseling appointments. These additions are a direct result of the conversation with the Board of Trustees following our February 2015 presentation.

Student Wellness and Education

  • First year students on the Oxford campus are required to complete 2 online educational courses before the start of classes in August: Alcohol Edu for College and HAVEN: Understanding Sexual Assault. We have had a successful administration of the courses this summer with nearly a 95% completion rate (as of September 1).

  • The Office of Student Wellness participated in the Welcome Week Block party. Students enjoyed visiting our booth where they could ride a stationary bike that powered a smoothie maker. Samples were enjoyed by all the participants. 

Women’s Center

  • The Women's Center hosted a screening and discussion of "She's Beautiful When She's Angry," a documentary about the women's movement of the 1960s and 1970s, on Sunday of Welcome Week (8/23). Forty attended, including 33 students.

  • The Women's Center, in partnership with the League of Women Voters of Oxford, celebrated Women's Equality Day (8/26) at the Armstrong Student Center, registering 91 new student voters.

  • The Women's Center's weekly e-newsletter signed up 200 new student subscribers over the summer through Welcome Week.

  • Approximately 230 patrons visited the Women's Center in June-July; approximately 180 patrons visited in August, for a summer total of 410 patron visits.

  • The Women's Center hosted the annual retreat of the SOCHE/GCCCU Women's Center's Committee on July 24, showcasing Miami's Women's Center to colleagues from across the state.

Collaborative Efforts

  • While the details are listed above, all efforts to welcome new student students require a large amount of collaboration both within Student Affairs and across the university. Orientation, new student move-in, pre-Welcome Week retreats, and Welcome Week are among our best examples of the power of collaboration.

  • OCES partnered with Student Counseling Services to offer the annual Welcome Wags (formerly Pet and Play) event during Welcome/Welcome Back Week. Students, faculty and staff were invited to stop by OCES to play with therapy dogs and learn about volunteering at local animal shelters and other community organizations. 301 students, faculty and staff attended, up from 236 in 2014.

  • The Office of Community Engagement & Service, Off-Campus Outreach and Communication, and Student Wellness partnered with Parent and Family Programs, City of Oxford, Oxford Visitors Bureau and the Oxford Chamber of Commerce for the 13th Annual Welcome Back Walkabout. Community members, faculty, staff and student leaders visited houses throughout the Mile Square to welcome off-campus students to the Oxford community by handing out cookies and important information about living off-campus. This year volunteers visited 1,114 off-campus addresses. Volunteers spoke to residents at 625 addresses (a 50.6% increase over last year), left information at 449 of the address, and 40 addresses were vacant.

Staff Achievements and Accomplishments

  • Buffy Stoll Turton, Director of New Student Programs, and Kathy Jicinsky, Assistant Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute, were selected as members of the 12-person 2015 Institute for Miami Leadership Development (IMLD) coordinated by the Provost’s Office. The aim of the IMLD is to ensure future leadership capable of moving Miami into a vastly changing and exciting educational landscape.

  • Kathy Jicinsky, Assistant Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute, presented a 3-hour session titled “Strengths-Based Leadership: Recognizing, Articulating, and Capitalizing on Our Strengths as Leaders” to the 2015 Study of the United States Institute (SUSI): Civic Engagement participants hosted by the Center for Civic Engagement at Miami University Hamilton and U.S. Department of State in July. SUSI is an international academic program for approximately 30 foreign undergraduate students, selected by the U.S. Embassies in their home countries for a six-week residency program focused on civic engagement. The participants were from Egypt, Iraq, Syria, Tunisia, the Palestinian Territories, and the United States.

  • Dr. Gwen Fears (Associate Dean of Students) and Kathy Jicinsky (Assistant Director of the Wilks Leadership Institute) presented an educational session titled “Making Assessment Accessible: A Multi-Pronged Approach to Building Capacity” at the 2015 Student Affairs Assessment and Research Conference in Columbus, Ohio on June 19.