Minor

A rabbi prays during an interfaith rally outside a government building
 A Buddhist monk observes as a doctor checks the blood pressure of a woman in a rural Burmese community
 A Sikh child in a modern blouse and a head covering smiles at the camera, while her grandmother, in more traditional dress, observes
 African Muslim militants sit on the ground, apparently doing schoolwork, with their weapons beside them
 A Hasidic Jewish couple, in traditional dress, walk down a city street with their young children

The religion minor gives you intellectual tools to help you confidently navigate culturally diverse settings and to address religious issues that relate to your major field of study. The minor can supplement your preparation for a career in law, government, education, health services, business, or nonprofit work.

What does the religion minor give you for the job market?

  • Exposes you to a diversity of religious traditions that may inform the identities of your future colleagues or clients.
  • Introduces you more deeply to your choice of two religious traditions, or religions from two regions of the world.
  • Teaches you theories and methods that you can apply to addressing issues, challenges, or opportunities in your field of work that arise from religion.
  • Prepares you for work and leadership in a diverse world by giving you practice at engaging empathetically with beliefs, values, and cultural practices different from your own.
  • Provides you with 18 credit hours of coursework designed to develop your skills in writing, critical reading, critical thinking, inquiry & analysis, and intercultural competence.

Other options to consider

How does the minor compare with a major or Thematic Sequence in the study of religion? Compare them side by side.

I. Foundational knowledge and skills  (9 hours)

A. Foundation in theory and method

REL 201 - Methods for the Study of Religion

You are formally introduced to major theories and methods that have been used in the academic study of religion. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

B. Foundations in traditions or regions

You take introductory courses on two religious traditions of your choice, or on religions in two world regions of your choice.

Choose one tradition or region associated with the global West
  • REL 233 - History of Christianity
  • REL 241 - Religions of the American People
  • REL 275 - Introduction to the Critical Study of Biblical Literature
  • REL 286 - Global Jewish Civilization
Choose one tradition or region from beyond the global West
  • REL 203 - Global Religions of India
  • REL 223 - Introduction to Buddhism
  • REL 226 - Introduction to Islam

II. Upper-level learning and application  (9 hours)

You take (typically) three upper-level courses of your choice, in which you apply academic theories and methods to questions or problems having to do with religion in society.

Choose from these courses
  • REL 312 - Religions of the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 313 - Marriage Across Cultures  
  • REL 314 - Social and Religious History of the Jewish People
  • REL 316 - The Age of the Reformation
  • REL 331 - Paul and the Beginnings of Christianity
  • REL 332 - The Development of Christianity, 100-451
  • REL 333 - Religion, Dress, and Status
  • REL 334 - Women's Religious Experiences in the Ancient Mediterranean World  
  • REL 335 - Women in the Bible
  • REL 336 - Jesus and the Gospels
  • REL 337 - Religions of Russia and Eurasia
  • REL 338 - Eastern Christianity
  • REL 341 - Protestantism and the Development of American Culture
  • REL 342 - Religious Pluralism in Modern America  
  • REL 343 - African American Religions  
  • REL 345 - Women, Religion, and Social Change in America
  • REL 346 - Issues in the Study of Native American Religions
  • REL 355 - Religion and Law
  • REL 360 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics  
  • REL 365 - Arab Gulf Economies in Social Transition
  • REL 376 - Global Militant Islamisms
  • REL 385 - The Religious Roots of Anti-Semitism
  • REL 392 - Philosophy of Religion

Note: With approval of the Chief Departmental Advisor, you could fill 3 credit hours with a course from another department on a subject having to do with religion in society.

Total: 18 hours

Overview

What does the religion minor give you for the job market?

  • Exposes you to a diversity of religious traditions that may inform the identities of your future colleagues or clients.
  • Introduces you more deeply to your choice of two religious traditions, or religions from two regions of the world.
  • Teaches you theories and methods that you can apply to addressing issues, challenges, or opportunities in your field of work that arise from religion.
  • Prepares you for work and leadership in a diverse world by giving you practice at engaging empathetically with beliefs, values, and cultural practices different from your own.
  • Provides you with 18 credit hours of coursework designed to develop your skills in writing, critical reading, critical thinking, inquiry & analysis, and intercultural competence.

Other options to consider

How does the minor compare with a major or Thematic Sequence in the study of religion? Compare them side by side.

Course requirements

I. Foundational knowledge and skills  (9 hours)

A. Foundation in theory and method

REL 201 - Methods for the Study of Religion

You are formally introduced to major theories and methods that have been used in the academic study of religion. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

B. Foundations in traditions or regions

You take introductory courses on two religious traditions of your choice, or on religions in two world regions of your choice.

Choose one tradition or region associated with the global West
  • REL 233 - History of Christianity
  • REL 241 - Religions of the American People
  • REL 275 - Introduction to the Critical Study of Biblical Literature
  • REL 286 - Global Jewish Civilization
Choose one tradition or region from beyond the global West
  • REL 203 - Global Religions of India
  • REL 223 - Introduction to Buddhism
  • REL 226 - Introduction to Islam

II. Upper-level learning and application  (9 hours)

You take (typically) three upper-level courses of your choice, in which you apply academic theories and methods to questions or problems having to do with religion in society.

Choose from these courses
  • REL 312 - Religions of the Hebrew Bible
  • REL 313 - Marriage Across Cultures  
  • REL 314 - Social and Religious History of the Jewish People
  • REL 316 - The Age of the Reformation
  • REL 331 - Paul and the Beginnings of Christianity
  • REL 332 - The Development of Christianity, 100-451
  • REL 333 - Religion, Dress, and Status
  • REL 334 - Women's Religious Experiences in the Ancient Mediterranean World  
  • REL 335 - Women in the Bible
  • REL 336 - Jesus and the Gospels
  • REL 337 - Religions of Russia and Eurasia
  • REL 338 - Eastern Christianity
  • REL 341 - Protestantism and the Development of American Culture
  • REL 342 - Religious Pluralism in Modern America  
  • REL 343 - African American Religions  
  • REL 345 - Women, Religion, and Social Change in America
  • REL 346 - Issues in the Study of Native American Religions
  • REL 355 - Religion and Law
  • REL 360 - Interdisciplinary Special Topics  
  • REL 365 - Arab Gulf Economies in Social Transition
  • REL 376 - Global Militant Islamisms
  • REL 385 - The Religious Roots of Anti-Semitism
  • REL 392 - Philosophy of Religion

Note: With approval of the Chief Departmental Advisor, you could fill 3 credit hours with a course from another department on a subject having to do with religion in society.

Total: 18 hours

Photo credits

Councilman Johnson's Prayer for the City Event 6-2-2017 by Flickr user Philadelphia City Council, licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0; cropped from original.

Health Care Program by Flickr user thebestfriend peaceinburma, licensed under CC BY 2.0; cropped from original, brightness-contrast increased.

SYC langar May 2012-009 by Flickr user Anuraj Singh, licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0; cropped from original.

Morocco dismantles terror recruitment cell by Flickr user Magharebia, licensed under CC BY 2.0; cropped from original.

Hasidic Family in Street - Borough Park - Hasidic District - Brooklyn - New York - USA by Flickr user Adam Jones, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0; cropped from original.