“It makes me feel like myself”: Person-centered versus traditional visual arts activities for people with dementia

July 21, 2014

Authors

  • Elizabeth "Like" Lokon
  • Jennifer M. Kinney

During February 2010 and April 2011, video data on people with dementia were collected during a person-centered and intergenerational arts activity program called Opening Minds through Art (OMA) at three different long-term care facilities in Ohio. A modified version of the Greater Cincinnati Chapter Well-Being Observation Tool was used to code the intensity and frequency of observed domains of well-being and ill-being. Paired-sample t-tests comparing OMA vs. traditional visual arts activities showed significantly higher intensity scores for OMA in the domain of engagement and pleasure, as well as significantly lower intensity scores for disengagement. The findings of this exploratory study contribute to the overall discussion about the impact of person-centered, creative-expressive arts activities on people with dementia. 

Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice, 15(5). doi: 10.1177/1471301214543958 

Publication available online, subscription may be required.

  • Arts and Aging
  • Chronic Illness/ Disability
  • Long-Term Care - Other
  • Mental Health