2014-15 Faculty Spotlight

Gary Lorigan

photo of Gary Lorigan(Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry)

I provide students with real-world examples of how these [biophysics] concepts are used on a day-to-day basis in the laboratory, which makes them more applicable and not theoretical. Students are therefore able to see the value of these concepts within a career setting.


Read what Dr. Lorigan had to say about his research on the structure of membrane proteins and how they coincide with heart disease.


Dawna "Cricket" Meehan

photo of Dawna (Center for School-Based Mental Health Programs)

I have always been interested in helping those with different mental challenges and illnesses. This sparked my interest in psychology—it's one of those fields that's really about people and their attitudes, beliefs, and perceptions. I realized that my work in psychology could be really helpful.


Read what Dr. Meehan had to say about directing the Center for School-Based Mental Health Programs.


Steven L. Tuck

photo of Steven Tuck(Department of Classics)

A vast majority of the students in my classes are not fulfilling a major requirement. Rather, those students are there because they want to be there, and that's what I really enjoy about teaching.


Read what Dr. Tuck had to say about the interdisciplinary nature of archaelology.


Mitchell Balish

photo of Mitchell Balish(Department of Microbiology)

What I enjoy most about teaching is when students just 'get it'…when I see a student's eyes open up, I get very excited!


Read what Dr. Balish had to say about his research with mycoplasmas—bacteria that cause disease in humans, plants, and animals.


Mary Jean Corbett

photo of Mary Jean Corbett(Department of English)

What I enjoy most about teaching is that I really like young people…I do not find teaching that exciting if I am just telling the students things—when we are working things out together, I find that the most interesting.


Read what Dr. Corbett had to say about her lifelong fascination with 19th century British literature.


Karen Dawisha

photo of Karen Dawisha(Department of Political Science)

I think students would say that I run a very active class. I believe in games and simulations and mock trials and debates. A scenario might be that it is 1985, Gorbachev has just come to power, and students have to play the parts of other members of the political elite and brief him on what the situation is in Eastern Europe. In other words, they have to do it from the Soviet perspective!


Read what Dr. Dawisha had to say about her books, including Putin's Kleptocracy: Who Owns Russia?.


Vaishali V. Raval

photo of Vaishali V. Raval(Department of Psychology)

I really enjoy my interactions with students, especially when students are interested in solving a real-world problem rather than focusing only on a grade.


Read what Dr. Raval had to say about her research on understanding how culture is connected to child health outcomes.


Noriko Reider

photo of Noriko Reider(Department of German, Russian, Asian, and Middle Eastern Languages and Cultures)

My interaction with students is very meaningful, and I like to hear their perspectives. I have great students, and they inspired my second book, Japanese Demon Lore: Oni, from Ancient Times to the Present.


Read what Dr. Rieder had to say about her many and varied interests in Japanese culture.


April Smith

photo of April Smith(Department of Psychology)

"I try to encourage my students to think like scientists…I also believe it's important to help students refine their critical thinking skills so that they can become active and informed consumers of information.


Read what Dr. Smith had to say about her research focused on reducing suicide-related deaths.