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General Bulletin 2006-2008

The Miami Plan for Liberal Education

The Miami Plan for Liberal Education

Liberal education complements specialized studies in your major and provides a broadened context for exploring personal and career choices. Every student, regardless of major, is required to participate in the Miami Plan for Liberal Education. Liberal education course work and co-curricular programming emphasize four basic goals:

  • Thinking Critically. Students learn how to develop critical thinking skills that enable them to carefully identify problems worth studying; to examine pros and cons about issues; to develop skills for examining evidence and counter-arguments; to analyze research and other information; to explore underlying assumptions about multiple positions and arguments; and to draw solid conclusions after examining all sides of an issue or problem.
  • Understanding Contexts. Students learn how to understand contexts that inform how we make meaning out of issues and events. They may explore political, social, economic, historical, or other contexts that surround problems or issues confronted. They learn that contextual analysis and understanding opens up new ways of knowing not only about the world in which you live, but also about yourself.
  • Engaging with Other Learners. The Miami Plan is based on the firm belief that we learn from one another, from people different than ourselves, and from a wide variety of others. A healthy exchange of different ideas and viewpoints encourages rethinking of accepted perspectives. Thus, students learn to think critically and to understand contexts through in- and out-of-class activities designed to engage them with other learners: other students, other faculty or staff, and other learners outside of the university. They learn how to work effectively in group settings, how to listen actively to the ideas of others, and how to negotiate a shared understanding of complex issues and tasks.
  • Reflecting and Acting. Finally, the Miami Plan encourages students to both reflect upon and act on the new knowledge, understanding, and commitments made. They learn how to make decisions about complex intellectual, ethical and personal issues; to think about the meaning of coursework for themselves, and to commit to informed action.

Requirements of the Miami Plan

All students must complete courses for the Miami Plan as well as courses in the major. The Miami Plan has three parts: Foundation Courses, a Thematic Sequence, and a Capstone Course.

The Foundation (MPF) requirement is met by taking 36 semester hours of Foundation courses in five specific areas:

I. English Composition (6 hours)
II. Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science (12 hours)
III. Cultures (6 hours)
    A. United States Cultures (3 hours)
    B. World Cultures (3 hours)
IV. Natural Science (9 hours, must include 1 laboratory course)
    A. Biological Science (3 hours minimum)
    B. Physical Science (3 hours minimum)
V. Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology (3 hours)

Additionally, to complete the Foundation area requirements, students must complete the following:

Historical (H) requirement - All students must take at least one Foundation course that presents a historical perspective (H). Students satisfy this requirement by taking an appropriately designated course in any Foundation area. The same course may meet both a Foundation area requirement and the historical perspective requirement.

First Year Seminar Requirement: All students must complete a seminar course in their first year. This requirement is met by completing a First Year Seminar course (denoted with an "F" in the course number; e.g. ENG F110; see adviser for listings), or ENG 112 or ENG 113, or a first year honors seminar, or the Western College Program core curriculum. The first year seminar requirement can also be met through Advanced Placement or the portfolio program of the Department of English for ENG 112.

The Thematic Sequence (MPT) requirement is met by completing three related courses (usually nine hours) in an approved Thematic Sequence outside their department of major. Thematic Sequence courses are designed.

The Capstone Course (MPC) course requirement is met by completing three hours in an approved Capstone course during their senior year.

Extended Study and Service-Learning in Miami Plan Courses

Students may gain an extra credit hour in any Foundation course, Thematic Sequence course, or Capstone for academic work and/or service-learning activities directly connected to the content and objectives of these courses. Students are responsible for initiating the extra-hour proposals. Instructors will determine whether the proposed work represents an extra credit hour and if their teaching schedules and related professional activities will permit them to sponsor and monitor these projects. The maximum number of hours of extended study or service-learning that can be applied to graduation is four; students may propose and enroll in such courses no more than once each semester.

An instructor should write a memo of understanding—preferably with the student—outlining expectations that must be fulfilled either by the end of the current semester or the semester immediately succeeding for the extra hour to be awarded. The academic department approves this memo before the project begins. Two grades are assigned: one for the primary course and one for the extended study and/or service-learning project. Credit/no-credit may be used for extended study and/or service-learning projects in Foundation courses and Thematic Sequence courses; credit/no-credit cannot be used in required Capstones in the student’s department of major.

Extended study and/or service-learning permits, which must be completed by students and endorsed by sponsoring instructors and department chairs, are available from the Office of Community Engagement and Service. For more information, consult the Office of Liberal Education or the Office of Community Engagement and Service.

Advanced Placement Credit

Advanced Placement credit may be used to satisfy Foundation course requirements, including the first course in a Thematic Sequence. Advanced Placement credit cannot be used for advanced, non-Foundation courses in a Thematic Sequence.

Course Descriptions and Abbreviations

Foundation courses are listed below according to the area they satisfy (English composition; fine arts, humanities; etc.). Some Foundation courses will appear in two or more Foundation areas. For example, ARC 188 is classified as a course in the fine arts as well as one in the humanities; it appears, then, in Foundation IIA (fine arts) and Foundation IIB (humanities). Students who take such courses may use them to fulfill one Foundation area requirement only.

I, II, III, IV, V: (Refers to Foundation courses outline.) Course fulfills a part of one of the five major Foundation area requirements (for example, I. English Composition).

A, B, or C: (Refers to Foundation courses outline.) Course fulfills a part of a sub-area of one of the Foundation requirements (for example: IIA. Fine Arts; IIB. Humanities; IIC. Social Science).

H: Fulfills the historical perspective requirement.

LAB: (all uppercase letters): Fulfills the laboratory course requirement for the Miami Plan.

Note: Other abbreviations and terms are explained in the Registering for Courses and Courses of Instruction chapters.

Foundation Courses

Foundation Courses That Meet the Historical Perspective (H) Requirement
AMS 101 Introduction to American Studies (3)
ARC 188 Ideas in Western Architecture (3)
ARC 221, 222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3)
ART 185 Asian Art in Context: India and Southeast Asia (3)
ART 186 History of Asian Art: China, Korea, and Japan (3)
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3)
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3)
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3)
ART/JPN/ REL 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (4)
ART 280 Art and Politics (3)
ATH/GEO/HST/ REL 207 Civilization of the Middle East (3)
ATH/GEO/HST/ITS/POL/ SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3)
ATH/BWS/GEO/HST/ REL 209 Civilization of Africa (3)
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4)
CLS 101 Greek Civilization (3)
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3)
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3)
ENG 121 Comedy or Tragedy (3)
ENG 125 Introduction to Drama (3)
ENG 131, 133 Life and Thought in English Literature (3, 3, 3)
ENG 141, 143 Life and Thought in American Literature (3, 3, 3)
ENG 163 Literature and Travel (3)
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3)
ENG 168/GER/ ARC 161 Romanticism: Roots of Modernity (3)
ENG 251, 252 Life and Thought in European Literature (3, 3)
ENG 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3)
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Literature in Translation (3)
FSW 160 Family Relations: Historical and Comparative Analysis (3)
GER 151 The German-American Experience (3)
GER 231 Folk Fairy Tales and Literary Fairy Tales (3)
GER 251 German Literature in Translation: Changing Concepts of the Self (3)
GER 252 Jews and German Culture (3)
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe: 1870 to Present (3)
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and the U.S. (3)
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3)
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (3, 3)
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (3, 3)
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3)
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3)
HST/BWS 224 Africa in History (3)
HST/BWS 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3)
HST 296 World History Since 1945 (3)
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3)
JPN 231 Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3)
LAS 207, 208 Latin American Civilization (3, 3)
LAS 299A Culture and History of Mexico (3)
MUS 135 Jazz, Its History and Evolution (3)
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3)
PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (3)
PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India and South Asia (3)
PHS 276 The Meaning of Leisure (3)
PHS 279 African Americans in Sport (3)
PHS 292 Dance, Culture and Contexts (3)
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (3)
REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (3)
REL 103 Religion, History, and Society (3)
REL 213 Religious and Social History of the Jewish People (3)
THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (3)
WCP 111 Creativity and Culture I (3)*
WCP 112 Creativity and Culture I (3)*
WCP 131 Social Systems I (3)*
WCP 132 Social Systems I (3)*
* The School of Interdisciplinary Studies provides information each semester on designated WCP courses that meet the Historical (H) perspective.

Foundation I. English Composition (6 hours)

ENG 109 English for Foreign Students (3)
ENG 111 College Composition (3)
ENG 112 Composition and Literature (3)*
ENG 113 Advanced College Composition (3)*
* Fulfills first-year seminar requirement.
Note: Students enrolled in Interdisciplinary Studies fulfill this requirement by taking the core curriculum.

Foundation II. Fine Arts, Humanities, Social Science (12 semester hours)

IIA. Fine Arts (3 hours minimum)

ARC 188 Ideas in Western Architecture (3) IIB, H
ARC 221,222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3) IIB, H
ART 181 Concepts in Art (3)
ART 183 Images of America (3) IIIA, IIB
ART 185 Asian Art in Context: India and Southeast Asia (3) IIB, IIIB, H
ART 186 History of Asian Art: China, Korea, and Japan (3) IIB, IIIB, H
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3) IIB, H
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3) IIB, H
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3) IIB, H
ART 256 Design, Perception, and Audience (3)
ART 280 Art and Politics (3) IIB, H
MUS 135 Jazz, Its History and Evolution (3) IIIA, H
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIB, IIIB
MUS 188 The Music of Russia (3)
MUS 189 Great Ideas in Western Music (3) H
THE 101 Introduction to Theatre: Drama and Analysis (3)*
THE 103 Introduction to Theatre: Production and Performance (1)*
THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (3) H
WCP 141 Interdisciplinary Fine Arts (3)
WCP 211 Creativity and Culture III (4) IIB
*must be taken concurrently

IIB. Humanities (3 hours minimum)

AMS 101 Introduction to American Studies (3) IIIA, H
ARC 188 Ideas in Western Architecture (3) IIA, H
ARC 221, 222 History and Philosophy of Environmental Design (3, 3) IIA, H
ART 183 Images of America (3) IIA, IIIA
ART 185 Asian Art in Context: India and Southeast Asia (3) IIA, IIIB, H
ART 186 History of Asian Art: China, Korea, and Japan (3) IIA, IIIB, H
ART 187 History of Western Art: Prehistoric-Gothic (3) IIA, H
ART 188 History of Western Art: Renaissance-Modern (3) IIA, H
ART 189 History of Western Dress (3) IIA, H
ART 280 Art and Politics (3) IIA, H
CHI/ JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3) IIIB
CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (3) H
COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals,
and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media (3) IIIA
EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (3)
ENG 121 Comedy or Tragedy (3) H
ENG 122 Popular Literature (3)
ENG 123 Introduction to Poetry (3)
ENG 124 Introduction to Fiction (3)
ENG 125 Introduction to Drama (3) H
ENG 131, 133 Life and Thought in English Literature (3, 3, 3) H
ENG 134 Introduction to Shakespeare (3)
ENG 141, 143 Life and Thought in American Literature (3, 3, 3) H
ENG 144 Major American Writers (3)
ENG 161 Literature and Politics (3)
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3) IIIA
ENG 163 Literature and Travel (3) H
ENG 165 Literature and Sexuality (3) H
ENG 168/GER/ ARC 161 Romanticism: Roots of Modernity (3) IIIB, H
ENG/ IMS 171 Humanities and Technology (3)
ENG 202 Varieties of American English: Dialect Diversity &Language Change (3) IIIA
ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3) IIIA
ENG 251, 252 Life and Thought in European Literature (3, 3) H
ENG/ LAS 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3) IIIA
ENG 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3) IIIA, H
FRE 131 Masterpieces of French Literature in Translation (3) H
FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (3)
GER 151 The German-American Experience (3) IIIA, H
GER 231 Folk Fairy Tales and Literary Fairy Tales (3) IIIB, H
GER 251 German Literature in Translation: Changing Concepts of the Self (3) IIIB, H
GER 252 Jews and German Culture (3) IIIB, H
HST 111, 112 Survey of American History (3, 3) IIIA, H
HST 121, 122 Western Civilization (3, 3) IIIB, H
HST 197 World History To 1500 (3) IIIB, H
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3) IIIB, H
HST/BWS 224 Africa in History (3) IIIB, H
HST/BWS 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3) IIIB, H
HST 296 World History Since 1945 (3) IIIB, H
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3) IIIB, H
JPN 231 Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3) IIIB, H
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIA, IIIB
PHL 101 Knowledge of World, God, and Morality (3)
PHL 103 Society and the Individual (3)
PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (3) H
PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (3)
PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (3)
PHS 292 Dance, Culture and Contexts (3) H
REL 101 Varieties of Religious Expression (3)
REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (3) H
REL 103 Religion, History, and Society (3) H
REL 213 Religious and Social History of the Jewish People (3) H
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3) IIIB
RUS/ ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in
English Translation (3)
WCP 112/114 Creativity and Culture II, III (3, 4) (114 is IIA)**

IIC. Social Science (3 hours minimum)

ATH 155 Introduction to Anthropology (4)
ATH 175 People of the World (3) IIIB
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3) IIIA
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (4) IIIA, H
COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)
COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication Theory and Issues (3)
ECO 131 Economic Perspectives on Inequality (3) IIIA
ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (3)*
ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)*
EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (3)
EDP 201 Human Development and Learning in Social and Educational Contexts (3)
ENG 201 Language Awareness (3)
FSW 160 Family Relations: Historical and Comparative Analysis (3) H
FSW/ NSG 162 Men in Families: A Critical Analysis of Selected Topics (3)
FSW 206 Social Welfare: Impact on Diverse Groups (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) IIIB
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3) IIIB
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3) IIIA
GTY 154 Aging in American Society (3)
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) IIIB, H
MGT 111 Introduction to Business (3)
PHS 188 Exercise and Health (4)
PHS 188L Exercise and Health Laboratory (1)
PHS 206 AIDS: Etiology, Prevalence, and Prevention (3)
PHS 242 Personal Health (3)
PHS 276 The Meaning of Leisure (3) H
PHS 279 African Americans in Sport (3) H
POL 101 Politics and National Issues (3)
POL 102 Politics and Global Issues (3)
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (3) IIIA
POL 159 U.S. Identity Politics (3) IIIA
PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (4)
SOC 141 Multiculturalism in the U.S. (3) IIIA
SOC 151 Social Relations (4)
SOC 152 Social Relations and U.S. Cultures (4) IIIA
SPA 127 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3)
SPA 211 Deaf Culture and Community (3) IIIA
SPA 223 Theories of Language Development (3)
WCP 131/133 Social Systems I (3, 3)**
WCP 231 Social Systems III (4)**
WMS 201 Introduction to Women’s Studies (3) IIIA
* ECO 201 and 202 are a year course; the recommended sequence is 201, 202. This course sequence ordinarily should not be taken during the freshman year.
** The School of Interdisciplinary Studies provides information each semester on designated WCP courses that meet the H perspective.

Foundation III. Cultures (6 hours)

IIIA. United States Cultures (3 hours minimum)

AMS 101 Introduction to American Studies (3) IIB, H
ART 183 Images of America (3) IIA, IIB
ATH 185 Cultural Diversity in the U.S. (3) IIC
BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (3) IIC, H
COM/FST/IDS 206 Diversity and Culture in American Film (3)
COM 281 Mediated Sexualities: Lesbians, Gays, Bisexuals, and Transgendered Persons and the Electronic Media (3) IIB
ECO 131 Economic Perspectives on Inequality (3) IIC
EDP 272 Disability Studies (3)
ENG 162 Literature and Identity (3) IIB
ENG 202 Varieties of American English: Dialect Diversity and Language Change (3) IIB
ENG 248 Asian American Literature (3) IIB
ENG/ LAS 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas (3) IIB
ENG 271 Cultures and Literature of the American South (3) IIB, H
GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (3) IIC
GER 151 The German-American Experience (3) IIB, H
HST 111,112 Survey of American History (3,3) IIB, H
HST/ LAS 260 Latin America in the United States (3)
ITL 222 Italian American Culture (3) IIB, H
MUS 135 Jazz: Its History and Evolution (3) IIA, H
POL 142 American Politics and Diversity (3) IIC
POL 159 U.S. Indentity Politics (3) IIC
PSY 210 Psychology Across Cultures (3)
SOC 141 Multiculturalism in the United States (3) IIC
SOC 152 Social Relations and U.S. Cultures (4) IIC
SPA 211 Deaf Culture and Community (3) IIC
WCP 111/113 Creativity and Culture I (3, 3)
WMS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (3) IIC

IIIB. World Cultures (3 hours minimum)

ART 185 Asian Art in Context: India and Southeast Asia (3) IIA, IIB, H
ART 186 History of Asian Art: China, Korea, and Japan (3) IIA, IIB, H
ART/JPN/ REL 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan (4) H
ATH/GEO/HST/ REL 207 Civilization of the Middle East (3) H
ATH/GEO/HST/ITS/POL/ SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia (3) H
ATH/BWS/GEO/HST/ REL 209 Civilization of Africa (3) H
ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3)
CHI 251 Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation (3)
CHI/ JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in English Translation (3) IIB
CLS 101 Greek Civilization (3) H
CLS 102 Roman Civilization (3) H
ENG 168/GER/ ARC 161 Romanticism: Roots of Modernity (3) IIB, H
FRE 202 Critical Analysis of French Culture (3)
GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (3) IIC
GEO 111 World Regional Geography: Patterns and Issues (3) IIC
GER 231 Folk Fairy Tales and Literary Fairy Tales (3) IIB, H
GER 251 German Literature in Translation: Changing Concepts of the Self (3) IIB, H
GER 252 The German-Jewish Experience (3) IIB, H
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe Since 1870 (3) H
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and the U.S.A. (3) H
HST 121,122 Western Civilization (3,3) IIB, H
HST 197 World History to 1500 (3) IIB, H
HST 198 World History Since 1500 (3) IIB, H
HST/BWS 224 Africa in History (3) IIB, H
HST/BWS 225 The Making of Modern Africa (3) IIB, H
HST 296 World History Since 1945 (3) IIIB, H
IDS 159 Strength Through Cultural Diversity (3)
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization (3) IIB, H
ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (3) IIC, H
JPN 231 Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation (3) IIB, H
LAS 207, 208/ ATH 206 Latin American Civilization (3, 3) H
MUS 185 Diverse Worlds of Music (3) IIA, IIB
PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India and South Asia (4) H
RUS 137 Russian Folklore (3) IIB
WCP 132 Social Systems II (3)

Foundation IV. Natural Science (9 hours, must include one laboratory course)

IVA. Biological Science (3 hours minimum)

BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts: Ecology, Evolution, Genetics, and Diversity (4) LAB
BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology (4) LAB
BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (3)
BOT 155 Field Botany (3) LAB
BOT 171 Ecology of North America (3)
BOT 191 General Botany (4) LAB
MBI 111 Microorganisms and Human Diseases (3)
MBI 121 The Microbial World (3)
MBI 123 Experimenting with Microbes (1) LAB
MBI 131 Community Health Perspectives (2)
MBI 143 Laboratory Diagnosis of Disease (1) LAB
MBI 161 Elementary Medical Microbiology (4) LAB
WCP 121/123 Natural Systems I (3, 3) LAB
WCP 221 Natural Systems III (4) LAB
ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (4) LAB
ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (4) LAB
ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (3)
ZOO 161 Human Physiology (4) LAB
ZOO 171 Human Anatomy and Physiology (4) LAB

IVB. Physical Science (3 hours minimum)

AER 101 Introduction to Aeronautics (3)
AER/ PHY 118 Introduction to Atmospheric Science (3)
CHM 111 Chemistry in Modern Society (4) LAB
CHM 131 Chemistry of Life Processes (4) LAB
CHM 137 College Chemistry (4)
CHM 141, 144 College Chemistry, College Chemistry Lab (3, 2) LAB
CHM 141M General Chemistry (3)
CHM 153 General Chemistry Laboratory (2) LAB
EDT 181, 182 Physical Science (4, 4) LAB
GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environment (4) LAB
GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (3) H
GLG 115L Understanding the Earth (1) LAB
GLG 121 Environmental Geology (3)
GLG 141 Geology of U.S. National Parks (3)
PHY 101 Physics and Society (3)
PHY 103 Concepts in Physics Laboratory (1) LAB
PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (3) H
PHY 121 Energy and Environment (3)
PHY 131 Physics for Music (3)
PHY 141 Physics in Sports (3)
PHY 181,182 The Physical World (4,4)
PHY 183,184 Physics Laboratory (1,1) LAB
WCP 122 Natural Systems II (3) LAB

Foundation V. Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology (3 hours minimum)

ARC 212 Principles of Environmental Systems (3)
ATH 309/ ENG 303/ GER 309/ SPN 303 Introduction to Linguistics (3)
CSA 151 Computers, Computer Science, and Society (3)
CSA 163 Introduction to Computer Concepts and Programming (3)
MTH 115 Mathematics for Teachers of Grades P-6 (4)
MTH 121 Finite Mathematical Models (3)
MTH 151 Calculus I (5)
MTH 153 Calculus I (4)
MTH 217 Mathematics for Middle School Teachers: Structure of Arithmetic and Algebra (3)
MTH 249 Calculus II (5)
PHL 273 Formal Logic (4)
PSE 120 Contrasting Environmental Systems of Developing and Developed Countries (3)
STA 261 Statistics (4)
WCP 142 Interdisciplinary Technology (3)

Thematic Sequence (9 hours minimum)

A Thematic Sequence is a series of related courses (usually three) that focuses on a theme or subject in a developmental way. Each course builds or expands upon knowledge or perspective gained from preceding courses, and some sequences prepare students for Capstone experiences. The first course may be a Foundation course and may count as hours in both Foundation and Thematic Sequence requirements. Advanced Placement credit may be used for the first Foundation course in a sequence. In interdepartmental Thematic Sequences, students must select those courses that are offered outside their department of major. For example, English majors who enroll in a Thematic Sequence comprised of English and history courses must sign up for the history courses.

You must complete at least one Thematic Sequence outside the department of your major. Exceptions to this requirement include either students with majors in two different academic departments or students with minors outside their department of major. Students should consult divisional requirements for further restrictions on Thematic Sequences.

Students who wish to meet the Thematic Sequence requirement through a double major or a minor must complete the second major or minor.

Typically, you are expected to complete most of your Foundation courses before beginning a Thematic Sequence. To enroll in a sequence, contact the department listed in the Course Schedule or the Course Planning Guide.

The Office of Liberal Education website (www.muohio.edu/led) provides a current listing of Thematic Sequences.

Thematic Sequences

ACC 1 A Language of Accounting
ACC 2 Financial Accounting and Reporting
AES 1 Air Power and National Security
ARC 1 Urban Issues of Public Welfare and Policy
ART 1 Women, Art and Art History
ART 2 Ceramics Studio
ART 3 Metals Studio
ART 4 Sculpture Studio
ART 5 Three-Dimensional Art Studio
ART 7 East Asian Art History
ATH 1 Earth, Ecology, and Human Culture
ATH 2 Museum Studies
ATH 3 World Cultures
ATH 4 World Cultures, Policy, and Ecology
ATH 5 World Cultures and Social Relations
BLS 1 Law and Commerce
BOT 1 Conservation and the Environment
BOT 2 Molecular Processes: From Cells to Whole Plants
BOT 3 Plant Ecology
BOT 4 Plant Structure and Development
CHI 1 Developing Language Skills in Chinese
CHM 1 Chemistry of Environmental Measurements
CHM 2 Chemistry of Life Processes
CLS 1 Classical Civilization
CLS 2 Classical Literature
COM 1 Relational Communication and Development in Modern Society
COM 2 Rhetorical Theory and Application
COM 3 Contexts of Mass Media
CSA 2 Computer Systems
CSA 3 Mathematical and Computer Modeling
DSC 1 Quantitative Concepts for Managerial Decision Making
DSC 2 Applied Business Statistics
ECO 1 Economics of Labor Markets
ECO 2 Markets, Institutions, and the Role of Government
ECO 3 Business Cycles, Economic Welfare, and Macroeconomic Policy
ECO 4 Exchange, Growth, and Development in the Global Economy
ECO 5 Sustainable Systems
ECO 6 Microeconomic Perspectives
EDL 1 Cultural Studies and Public Life
EDP 1 Developmental, Social, and Educational Patterns in Individuals with Exceptionalities
ENG 1 Victorian Literature and Culture
ENG 2 Women and Literature
ENG 3 American Life and Culture Since World War II
ENG 4 Film in Popular Culture
ENG 5 Language and Literacy
ENG 6 Modernism
ENG 7 The Romantic Era
ENG 8 African American History and Literature
ESP 1 Entrepreneurship in Different Contexts
FRE 1 French Cultural Studies (with FRE Capstone)
FRE 2 French Cultural Studies (without FRE Capstone)
FRE 3 European Cinema
FSW 1 Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families
FSW 2 Families in Diverse Contexts
FSW 3 Families and Sexuality Across the Life Course
FSW 4 Children in Families
GEO 1 Urban Geography
GEO 2 Earth’s Physical Environment: Geographic Patterns and Processes
GEO 3 Geographic Change
GEO 4 Global Forces in Regional Contexts
GER 1Culture, Literature, and Language of German Speaking Europe
GER 2 Recurrent Themes in German Literature and Film
GER 3 Developing Language Skills in German
GLG 1 Oceanography
GLG 2 The Water Planet
GTY 1 Sociological Perspectives on Aging
GTY 2 Aging in Diverse Contexts
HST 1 Medieval Studies
HST 2 Women and Gender in History
IMS 1 Design, Development, and Management of Interactive Media: Business and Engineering Track
IMS 2 Design, Development, and Management of Interactive Media: Humanities, Arts, and Social Science Track
IMS 3 3D Animation and Game Design
ITL 1 Italy in the Renaissance
JPN 1 Developing Language Skills in Japanese
LAS 1 Modern Latin American Development
LAS 2 People and Power in the Americas
MBI 1 Biomedical Science
MBI 2 Molecular Genetics
MGT 1 Dynamics of Human Behavior in Organizations
MIS 1 Information Management, Technology,
and the Role of Electronic Commerce
MIS 2 Applications Integration With Enterprise Systems
MIS 3 Mining and Knowledge Management
MKT 1 Marketing Research
MKT 2 Promotion and Persuasion
MKT 3 Retailing in a Global Environment
MKT 5 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing
MME 1 Automation and Society
MME 2 Modelling, Computer Graphics, and Design
MME 3 The Art and Science of Engineering Thinking: A Design-based Approach to Creative Problem-Solving
MTH 1 Axioms, Theorems, and Proof in Geometry and Algebra
MTH 2 Basic Mathematical Tools for Science
MTH 3 Almost Linear Structures: Models for Physical Science
MUS 1 The Performance of Music
MUS 2 Music Composition
MUS 3 African and African-Derived Music in the Western World
NSC 1 Naval Science: History of Warfare
NSC 2 Naval Science: War—An Extension of Politics
NSC 3 The Naval Sciences—An Integrated Study of Naval Engineering, Navigation, and Piloting
PCE 1 Chemical Engineering Principles
PHL 1 Applied Ethics
PHL 4 Metaphysics and Epistemology
PHL 5 Reasoning
PHS 1 Biophysical Health Across the Lifespan
PHY 1 The Physical World: Contemporary Physics
PHY 2 Your Place in the Universe
POL 1 Comparative Analysis of Foreign Policy
POL 3 National Political Institutions
PSY 1 Perspectives on Psychopathology
PSY 2 Patterns in Human Development
PSY 4 Developmental Patterns in Adulthood
PSY 5 Cognition: Understanding and Improving Thought
REL 1 Religion and American Life
REL 2 Historical and Comparative Study of Religion
REL 3 Religion and Philosophy of Buddhist Asia
REL 5 Jewish Civilization Through History
RUS 1 Russia and the Soviet Union
RUS 2 Russian Culture
RUS 3 Developing Language Skills in Russian
SBI 1 Summer Business Institute for Non-Business Majors/Minors
SDT 1 Self Designed Thematic Sequence
SOC 2 Applied Social Science Methods
SOC 3 Sociological Perspectives on Inequality
SOC 4 Sociological Perspectives on Criminality and Deviance
SPA 2 Exploring Social, Emotional, and Communication Consequences in Special Populations
SPN 1 Literature and Culture in Spain
SPN 2 Literature and Culture in Spanish America
SPN 3 Spanish Linguistics and Culture
STA 1 Quality Issues in Contemporary Business and Industry
STA 2 Applied Statistics
THE 1 Modern Theatre and Drama
WMS 1 Women and the World
ZOO 1 Concepts in Physiology
ZOO 2 Animal Diversity

Thematic Sequences Available at Dolibois European Center, Luxembourg

For information contact the Oxford campus coordinator (513-529-5050).

LUX 1 The Development of Contemporary Europe - Social Science Emphasis
LUX 2 The European Cultural Heritage
LUX 3 European Culture and Society
LUX 4 The Development of Contemporary Europe - Business Emphasis

Descriptions of Thematic Sequences

ACC 1 A Language of Accounting. Develops in non-business majors an ability to read and understand general-purpose external financial statements and internal managerial accounting reports for businesses and not-for-profit organizations. As such financial data are widely disseminated across all contexts in our society, a knowledge of the language of accounting is useful in a professional career and personal life. The focus is on using and interpreting, rather than preparing, financial statements and internal accounting reports.

1. ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3); and
2. ACC 222 Introduction to Managerial Accounting (3); and
3. ACC 225 The Accounting Process (1); and
4. ACC 468 Accounting for Governmental Operations (2); and
5. ACC 469 Accounting for Non-Governmental Not-For-Profit Organizations (1)
Note: Not open to business majors.

ACC 2 Financial Accounting and Reporting. Develops in business majors as well as non-business majors an ability to read and understand general-purpose financial statements of businesses, ranging from large publicly traded corporations to small privately held companies. As such financial information is widely disseminated, an understanding of financial statements is useful in a professional career and personal life. The sequence progresses from an introductory level, which focuses on using and interpreting financial statements, through intermediate and advanced levels, which examine the impact of more complex transactions and events on financial statements.

1. ACC 221 Introduction to Financial Accounting (3); and
2. ACC 225 The Accounting Process (1); and
3. ACC 321 Intermediate Financial Accounting (3); and
4. ACC 422 Financial Accounting Research (3)
Note: Not open to business majors.

AES 1 Air Power and National Security. Provides students opportunity to examine critically the definitions of national security and how national security policies affect­—and are affected by­—the context of international politics. The sequence examines, in particular, how the United States Air Force plays a major role in formulating national security policies.

1. POL 271 International Politics (MPF) (4); and
2. AES 221, 222 The Development of Air Power (1, 1); and
3. POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy (3); and
4. AES 431 National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

ARC 1 Urban Issues of Public Welfare and Policy. Enhances theoretical knowledge and understanding of urban issues. Exposure to complexities of cultures, economics, demographics, politics, physical landscapes, and patterns of cities. Confronts you with the challenge of reconciling the complex, contradictory, and dialectic natures and discourses of human relationships expressed both through and amidst urban landscapes. Presents parallax of interdisciplinary integration as each discipline contributes a distinct perspective upon urban phenomena. Courses may be taken in any order; however, they must be from at least two departments and from departments other than your department of major.

ARC 405H Social Structure in Urban Settlement and Habitation (3)
ARC 405.I Urban Issues of Housing (3)
ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3)
GEO 454 Urban Geography (3)
POL 364 Federalism and Intergovernmental Relations (3)
POL 467 Public Budgeting (3)
Note: Open to all majors. Majors in architecture or in the departments of Geography or Political Science must complete a minimum of nine hours of course work from departments other than their major.

ART 1  Women, Art and Art History. Introduces the role of women as subjects as well as creators and patrons of art from antiquity to the present. Considers the role of women in the study of art and art history and in the creation of the “new art history.”

1. ART 189 History of Western Dress (MPF) (3), or
     ART 280 Art and Politics (MPF) (3); and
2. Two of the following:
     ART 476 Origins of Art in Europe, Egypt, and the
    Ancient Near East (3)
     ART 480W Women in Medieval Art (3)
     ART 480X Women in Art: Renaissance to Modern (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 2 Ceramics Studio. Explores and develops concepts, techniques, materials, methods, and critical aesthetic thinking as applied to the process of making utilitarian or sculptural ceramics. Ceramics as a nonverbal visual language is taught through research, production, viewing, interaction, and verbal critique with a focus on further development toward a significant personal expression at the 300 level. Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102 Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).

1. ART 261 Ceramics I (3); and
2. ART 361 Ceramics II (3); and
3. ART 362 Ceramics III (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 3  Metals Studio. Explores and develops concepts, critical aesthetic thinking, methods, techniques, and materials as applied to the process of designing and making of jewelry, holloware, as well as functional and nonfunctional objects in non-precious and precious metals. Metals as a visual language is taught through research, interaction, production, and verbal critique with a focus on further development toward a more significant personal expression at the 300 level. Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102 Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).

1. ART 264 Jewelry Design and Metals I (3); and
2. ART 364 Jewelry Design and Metals II (3); and
3. ART 365 Jewelry Design and Metals III (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 4  Sculpture Studio. Explores concepts and develops critical aesthetic thinking, methods, techniques, and materials as applied to the process of making sculpture. Sculpture, as a visual language, is taught through viewing, research, interaction, production, and verbal critique with focus on further development toward significant personal expression at the 300 level. Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102 Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).

1. ART 271 Introduction to Sculpture I (3); and
2. ART 371 Sculpture II (3); and
3. ART 372 Sculpture III (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 5  Three-Dimensional Art Studio. Explores and develops concepts, techniques, materials, methods, and critical aesthetic thinking as applied to the process of making three-dimensional objects. Three-dimensional art as a nonverbal language is taught through research, production, viewing, interaction, and verbal critique with a focus on further development toward a significant personal expression. Begins with the departmental core course then provides a broad experience of working in three disciplines: metals, ceramics, and sculpture. Prerequisite: ART 171 Visual Fundamentals 3-D (3), or ARC 101, 102 Environmental Design Studio (5, 5).

Courses may be taken in any order:
ART 261 Ceramics I (3); and
ART 264 Jewelry Design & Metals I (3); and
ART 271 Sculpture I (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ART 7  East Asian Art History. Explores the richness and complexity of East Asian culture through a study of Asian art. The first course provides an overview of the art of China, Korea, and Japan, and introduces the basic philosophies and historical movements that shaped the history of art. The second examines in detail the development of specific genres in Chinese painting and calligraphy, with particular attention paid to Chinese thought and social history. The third course demonstrates the influence of China in the development of Japanese painting and prints, and explores in depth both what is unique to Japan and the distinctive Japanese interpretation of outside influences.

1. ART 186 History of Asian Art: China, Korea, Japan (MPF) (3); and
2. ART 478 Chinese Painting History (3); and
3. ART 479 Japanese Painting and Prints (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Art.

ATH 1  Earth, Ecology, and Human Culture. Examines some of the complex interrelationships of human culture with the earth. Because cultural assumptions have roots in religion, philosophy, politics, and economics, the sequence explores ways in which basic ideas in these fields influence our understanding of our relation to the earth, its biosphere, history, and resources.

1. PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4); and
2. Two from the following:
ATH 371 Anthropology of Parks and Protected Areas (3)
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
GEO 271 Conservation of Natural Resources (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy. Majors in anthropology or in the departments of Geography or Geology must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

ATH 2 Museum Studies. Provides an understanding of museum functions, their cultural and historical context, cultural processes of granting significance and value to the tangible world, and opportunity to participate in solving problems and making decisions in museum work. Work with museum collections, conservation techniques, information management, interpretation, communication, and exhibition. With great diversity in museum responsibilities and activities, this sequence provides opportunity to apply knowledge within a practical context.

1. ATH 441 Museum Development, Philosophy, and
Social Context (3); and
2. ATH 444 Museum Collections Management and
Conservation (3); and
3. ATH 443 The Museum Exhibit (3)
Note: Not open to anthropology majors.

ATH 3 World Cultures. Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and how anthropologists interpret that diversity in marriage and family patterns, political and economic organizations, and symbol systems. Acquaints you with various perspectives anthropologists use to understand human cultural variability. The final course allows you to pursue cultural diversity in one of the world’s major culture areas or in the relations between culture and one specific aspect of life for all people, such as personality, environment, or cognition.

1. ATH 175 Peoples of the World (MPF) (3); and
2. ATH 231 Perspectives on Culture (3); and
3. ATH 303 Native American Culture (4), or
ATH 304 Contemporary Issues in Native American Life (3), or
ATH 305 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3), or
ATH 307 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3), or
ATH 322 The American Community (3), or
ATH/BWS/LAS/WMS 325 Indentity: Race, Gender, Class (3), or ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3), or
ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions (3), or
ATH 465 Seminar in Linguistic Anthropology (3), or
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3)
Note: Not open to anthropology majors.

ATH 4 World Cultures, Policy, and Ecology. Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and envelops anthropological approaches to understanding diversity in political, economic and environmental organization and practice.

1. ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3); and
2. One of the following courses on a World Area:
     ATH 303 Native American Cultures (4); or
     ATH 304 Contemporary Issues in Native American Life (3); or
     ATH 305 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3); or
     ATH 306 Peoples and Cultures of Russia and Eurasia (3); or
     ATH 307 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3); or
     ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3); or
     ATH 364 Language and Cultures in Native North America (3); or
    ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions (3); and
3. Take one of the following courses on anthropological topics in world cultures:
     ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3); or
     ATH 431 Origins of State (3); or
     ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology (3).
Note: Not open to anthropology majors.

ATH 5 World Cultures and Social Relations. Provides an appreciation of human cultural diversity and develops anthropological approaches to understanding diversity in social and economic organization, marriage and family patterns, and other facets and forums for social relations.

1. ATH 175 Peoples of the World (3); and
2. One of the following courses on a World Area:
     ATH 303 Native American Cultures (4); or
     ATH 304 Contemporary Issues in Native American Life (3); or
     ATH 305 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3); or
     ATH 306 Peoples and Cultures of Russia and Eurasia (3); or
     ATH 307 Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East (3); or
     ATH 329 Religions of Africa (3); or
     ATH 364 Language and Cultures in Native North America (3); or
    ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions (3); and
3. One of the following courses on anthropological topics in world cultures:
    ATH/ ITS 301 Intercultural Relations (3); or
    ATH/BWS/LAS/WMS 325 Identity: Race, Gender, Class, Sexuality (3);
     ATH 331 Social Anthropology (3), or
     ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism (3)
Note: Not open to anthropology majors.

BLS 1 Law and Commerce. Examines legal theory, history, and institutions as they relate to American culture, society and business. Focuses on why and how "American law" developed, how and why it is applied, how and why the law is evolving, and how and why it impacts commerce. Applies legal principles to analyze, identify and solve legal problems arising in common business activity. Emphsizes in-depth study of legal rules, rationale, and application in substantive areas of law and commerce. Acquaints potential law students with legal thinking and application in substantive areas of law and commerce. Acquaints potential law students with legal thinking and concepts.

1. BLS 342 Legal Environment of Business (3)*; and
2. BLS 442 Business Associations and Commercial Law (3); and
3. ECO 385 Government and Business (3), or
     BLS 443 Property Law (3), or
    FIN 462 Estates, Wills, and Trusts (3), or
     BLS 464 International Business Law (3), or
     BLS 483 Comparative International Business Law (4), or
     MGT 402 Employment Law (3)
* Certain sections of BLS 342 have seats designated for non-business majors who wish to enroll in the sequence. Please contact Dr. Daniel Herron, 14 Upham (513-529-1574) for admission to these sections.
Note: Not open to majors in business.

BOT 1 Conservation and the Environment. Focuses on the challenge of reconciling increasing demands on resources with limitations on resource availability, and explores conservation as it pertains to the environment from a biological and social science perspective, including a historical overview. The first course, chosen from three options, is also a Foundation course in the biological science area. The second course integrates ecological, socioeconomic, and policy perspectives on the use and management of natural resources. The third course focuses on applied problem solving.

1. BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and Environment (MPF) (3), or
     BOT 171 Ecology of North America (MPF) (3), or
     ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (MPF) (3); and
2. GEO 271 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation (3); and
3. IES 431 Principles and Applications of Environmental Science (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography. Majors in the Department of Botany must select ZOO 121 at the first level; majors in the Department of Zoology must select a botany course at the first level.

BOT 2 Molecular Processes: From Cells to Whole Plants. A contemporary consideration of how plants work mechanistically. Combines molecular and subcellular structure and function with physical and chemical measurements of underlying genetic and physiological controls. Deals with establishment, replication, maintenance, coordination, and adaptive responses of plants at organizational levels ranging from molecules to whole plants.

1. BOT 191 General Botany (MPF) (4), or
    BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function,
    Cellular, and Molecular Biology (MPF) (4); and
2. BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4); and
3. BOT/ ZOO 342 Genetics (3), or
     BOT 425 Plant Physiology (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Botany. Majors in the Department of Zoology must take BOT 342 or BOT 425 at the third level.

BOT 3 Plant Ecology. Provides an understanding of how plants interact with the environment, other plants, and other organisms. Included is study of the evolution of plant traits that are important in these interactions and factors that influence plant distributions at global and local scales. Several levels of organization are covered, including individuals, populations, communities, ecosystems, and landscapes.

1. BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (MPF) (4), or
     BOT 191 General Botany (MPF) (4); and
2. BOT 204 Evolution of Plant Biodiversity: Genes to Biosphere (4); and
3. BOT401 Plant Ecology (3), or
    BOT/ GEO 431 Global Plant Diversity (3), or
    BOT/ GEO 432 Ecoregions of North America (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Botany.

BOT 4 Plant Structure and Development. In order to appreciate the unique role that plants play in the world’s ecosystems, it is important to understand plant structure and development. This sequence allows students to consider plants from the molecular and cellular level to the tissue and organ level. It illustrates how evolutionary forces have resulted in exquisite adaptations in plant form and function.

1. BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function (MPF) (4), or
     BOT 191 General Botany (MPF) (4); and
2. BOT 203 Introduction to Plant Cell and Molecular Biology (4); and
3. BOT 312 Plant and Fungal Diversity (3); or
     BOT 402 Plant Anatomy (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Botany.

CHM 1 Chemistry of Environmental Measurements. Enhances theoretical knowledge toward understanding environmental chemical issues and provides a foundation for learning followed by systematic investigation of advanced concepts in chemistry. Allows accomplished students to take alternative courses.

1. CHM 138 College Chemistry (4), or
     CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry, or College Chemistry Laboratory (3, 2), or
     CHM 142M, 161 Inorganic Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis (4, 2); and
2. CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4), or
     CHM 241, 244 Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry Laboratory (3, 2), or
     CHM 251, 254 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors, Laboratory (3, 3); and
3. CHM 363, 364 Analytical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (3, 2)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

CHI 1 Developing Language Skills in Chinese. For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Chinese language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from textbooks as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no credit and must be taken in order.

1. CHI 201 Intermediate Chinese I (3)
2. CHI 202 Intermediate Chinese II (3)
3. CHI 301 Chinese Conversation, Composition, Reading (3)

CHM 2  Chemistry of Life Processes. Enhances theoretical knowledge toward understanding biochemistry and provides a foundation for learning followed by the systematic investigation of advanced concepts in chemistry. Allows accomplished students to take alternative courses. Prerequisite: CHM 141, 153 (all Foundation courses); alternative courses require additional prerequisites.

1. CHM 138 College Chemistry (4), or
     CHM 142, 145 College Chemistry, or College Chemistry Laboratory (3, 2), or
     CHM 142M, 161 Inorganic Chemistry, Quantitative Analysis (4, 2); and
2. CHM 231 Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry (4), or
     CHM 241, 244 Organic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry Laboratory (3, 2), or
     CHM 251, 254 Organic Chemistry for Chemistry Majors, Laboratory (3, 3); and
3. CHM 332 Outlines in Biochemistry (4), or
     CHM 432 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (4), or
     CHM 433 Biochemistry (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

CLS 1  Classical Civilization. Combines a general introduction to classical civilization and an in-depth encounter with Greco-Roman civilization, focusing on elements that provide opportunities for observing differences between modern and ancient civilization. Uses literature, monuments, legal documents, art, and sculpture to examine key examples of social organization, including the status of women, legal structures, and urban organization.

1. CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (MPF)(3), or
     CLS 102 Roman Civilization (MPF) (3), or
     CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (MPF) (3); and
2. CLS 210C Roman Cities (3), or
     CLS 210E Eureka: Monumental Discoveries in the Attics of Antiquity (3), or
     CLS 210J Art and Archaeology of Egypt (3); or
     CLS 210R Race and Ethnicity (3), or
     CLS 235 Women in Antiquity (3), or
     ART 381 Greek and Roman Architecture (3); and
3. CLS 310D Democracy and Identity in Ancient Athens (3), or
     CLS 310E Conflict in Greco-Roman Eqypt (3), or
     CLS 310I Ancient Imperialism (3), or
     CLS 310S Egypt in Greco History and Fiction (3), or
     CLS 310T Arts and Empire in the Classical World and Russia (3), or
     CLS 321 Justice and the Law (3), or
     CLS 322 Growing Old in Greece and Rome (3), or
     ART 382 Greek and Roman Painting (3), or
     ART 383 Greek and Roman Sculpture (3), or
    ART 384 Greek and Roman Decorative Arts (3); or
    REL/WMS 334 Women’s Religious Experiences in the Ancient Mediterranean World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics. Majors in the departments of Art and Comparative Religion must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

CLS 2  Classical Literature. Provides an overview of Greek or Roman literature, then examines in detail the historical evolution of specific genres, such as tragedy, drama, and epic. Attention to historical forces that brought these genres into existence and those forces that affected their growth and development.

1. CLS 101 Greek Civilization in its Mediterranean Context (MPF) (3), or
     CLS 102 Roman Civilization (MPF) (3), or
     CLS 121 Introduction to Classical Mythology (MPF) (3); and
2. CLS 210/ RUS 250 Classical Tradition in Russian Poetry (3); or
     CLS 211 Greek and Roman Epic (3), or
     CLS 212 Greek Tragedy (3), or
     CLS 213 Greek and Roman Comedy (3); or
     CLS 215 Roman Historians (3); and
3. CLS 310P From the Lair of the Cyclops to the Surface of the Moon: Travel and Self-Definition in Antiquity (3), or
     CLS 310S Egypt in Greco-Roman History and Fiction (3)
     CLS 310T Arts and Empire in the Classical World and Russia (3)
     CLS 316 Greek and Roman Lyric Poetry (3), or
     CLS 317 Greek and Roman Philosophical Writers (3), or
     CLS 331 From Epic to Romance (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Classics.

COM 1  Relational Communication and Development in Modern Society. Explores how people use verbal and nonverbal communication to define, negotiate, and change their interpersonal relationships. Seeks to enhance an appreciation of the importance of context and diversity by exploring cultural and individual difference variables, employing a transactional perspective, and examining diverse relational situations.

1. COM 136 Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (MPF) (3); and
2. COM 336 Advanced Interpersonal Communication (3); and
3. COM 338 Communication in Conflict Management (3), or
     COM 434 Nonverbal Communication (3), or
    FSW/WMS 361 Couple Relationships: Diversity and Change (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Communication. Majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

COM 2  Rhetorical Theory and Application. Develops an understanding of the relationships among speakers, messages, and audiences in a variety of contexts. Begins by exploring theoretical bases of informative and persuasive messages, then moves into finer analysis of issues and ideas in particular rhetorical situations.

1. COM 135 Public Expression and Critical Inquiry (MPF) (3); and
2. COM 239 Rhetorical Theory (3); or
     COM 241 Methods of Rhetorical Criticism (3); and
3. COM 332 Argumentation and Debate (3), or
     COM 335 Public Discourse in Western Thought (3), or
    COM/ HST 389 Great Issues in American History (3), or
     COM 438 Political Communication (3), or
     COM 447 Mass Media Criticism (3).
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Communication.

COM 3  Contexts of Mass Media. Focuses on ways the mass media have developed and the ways scholars have sought to explain the impact of media on society and society’s impact on media. Explores how the media are historically situated and how political, economic, social and cultural structures, and decisions have led to the type of media that have developed in this country and around the world.

1. COM 143 Introduction to Mass Communication Theory and Issues (MPF) (3); and
2. COM 215 Electronic Media History (3); and
3. COM 354 Media and Society (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Communication.

CSA 2 Computer Programming. Because computer information systems usually are not developed by single individuals, it is likely that you will participate on a development team during your professional life. With this sequence, you are in a unique position to understand, assist, and contribute to the development of information systems that improve your own and your colleagues’ way of work. Prerequisite: Ability to program.

1. CSA 174 Fundamentals of Programming and Problem Solving (3); and
2. CSA 271 Object-Oriented Programming (3); and
3. CSA 274 Data Abstraction and Data Structures (3) or
     CSA 275 Data Processing and File Design (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Computer Science and Systems Analysis.

CSA 3 Mathematical and Computer Modeling. Enhances your ability to approach applied problems in a quantitative way. Use your knowledge of calculus, probability, statistics, and computing to develop quantitative models of problem situations from a variety of areas. The first course provides an introduction to quantitative modeling, using calculus. All elements of the problem situation are represented as constants. The second course uses probability and statistics to create stochastic models in which some elements of the problem are represented as random variables. The third course introduces the use of computers to create simulation models of the problem situation.

1. CSA 273 Optimization Modeling (3); and
2. CSA 372 Stochastic Modeling (3); and
3. CSA 471 Simulation (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Computer Science and Systems Analysis.

DSC 1  Quantitative Concepts for Managerial Decision Making. Enhances analytical capabilities and provides breadth and depth of course work in decision science methodology. While its contextual orientation is business, the techniques and processes discussed and ways of thinking developed are applicable to every field. The underlying aim is improved decision making and action through thought that is informed by statistical and management science methodologies.

1. DSC 205 Business Statistics (4); and
2. DSC 305 Applied Regression Analysis in Business (3); and
3. DSC 321 Quantitative Analysis of Business Problems (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Decision Sciences and Management Information Systems.

DSC 2  Applied Business Statistics. Enhances analytical capabilities and teaches fundamental concepts of statistical thinking. Provides breadth and depth of course work in business statistics methodology. While the academic area of business forms its contextual orientation, the techniques and processes discussed and ways of thinking developed are applicable to every field. The underlying aim is improved decision making and action through thought that is informed by statistical analysis.

1. DSC 205 Business Statistics (4); and
2. DSC 305 Applied Regression Analysis in Business (3); and
3. DSC/ STA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
     DSC 442 Design of Experiments in Business (3), or
     DSC 444 Business Forecasting (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Decision Sciences and Management Information Systems.

ECO 1 Economics of Labor Markets. Provides an understanding of how labor markets work, the impact and/or need for employment related public policies, and why employment outcomes (wages, benefits, hours worked, retirement ages) differ across time and people. Primarily provides understanding from an economic perspective.

1. ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF) (3); and
2 ECO 361 Labor Economics (3); and
3. ECO 462 The Economics of Compensation, Discrimination, and Unionization (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 2 Markets, Institutions, and the Role of Government. In some situations, competitive markets fail to allocate resources efficiently. In some instances, production is concentrated in the hands of a few firms that may restrain output and raise prices. In other cases, market prices fail to fully reflect the costs or benefits associated with the consumption or production of certain goods. This arises in the case of externalities or government in ensuring allocative efficiency.

1. ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF) (3); and
2. Two from the following:
     ECO 321 Economic Institutions and the Competitive System (3), or
     ECO 385 Government and Business (3), or
     ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 3 Business Cycles, Economic Welfare, and Macroeconomic Policy. Concern for the material well-being of individuals motivates the study of aggregates since fluctuations in these aggregates and changes in their growth rates significantly affect welfare. Focuses on possible government initiatives to influence the behavior of economic aggregates and enhance welfare. Addresses rationale for government intervention, practical difficulties associated with actual implementation of policy, and evaluation of policy. Macroeconomic history and current policy discussions provide many applications. Provides understanding of motives, pitfalls, and history of macroeconomic policy.

1. ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (MPF) (3); and
2. ECO 317 Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory (3); and
3. ECO 418 Monetary Theory and Policy (3), or
     ECO 419 Business Cycles (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 4 Exchange, Growth, and Development in the Global Economy. Evolution of the modern world economy has been influenced not only by technical and institutional changes within national economics but also by interactions among them. Substantial international flows of people, goods, capital, and technology, since the beginning of the modern era, have helped to set the terms for development of national patterns of economic growth and specialization. Introduces formal analysis of international economic relations in the areas of trade, financial flows, and government policies, and then encourages examination of international economic developments in various historical and institutional settings.

1. ECO 344 International Economic Relations (3); and
2. Two from the following:
     ECO 341 Economic History of Modern Europe (3), or
     ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems (3), or
     ECO 347 Economic Development (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

ECO 5 Sustainable Systems. Sustainability requires that business and resource use be conducted in ways that meet the needs of the enterprise and its stakeholders today, while protecting, sustaining, and enhancing human resources and the environment for the future. Provides scientific, philosophic, and economic principles necessary to appreciate a sustainable system. Sequence of four courses.

1. BOT 131 Plants, Humanity, and the Environment (MPF) (3), or
     ZOO 121 Environmental Biology (MPF) (4), or
     GLG 121 Environmental Geology (MPF) (3); and
2. GEO 271 Conservation of Natural Resources (3); and
3. PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4); and
4. ECO 434 Environmental Economics (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Geography or Philosophy, or in the School of Business. Majors in the departments of Botany, Zoology, and Geology must select a course outside the department of their major at the first level.

ECO 6 Microeconomic Perspectives. Introduces theory and practice of microeconomics and develops, both intuitively and formally, the prevailing paradigm for describing decision-making processes of microeconomics agents. Students see how the “microeconomic way of thinking” can be applied to a wide variety of topical political and social issues and discover how it provides a coherent and consistent structure for understanding, analyzing, and dealing with “real world” problems.

1. ECO 201 Principles of Microeconomics (MPF) (3); and
2. ECO 202 Principles of Macroeconomics (MPF) (3); and
3. ECO 315 Intermediate Microeconomic Theory (3); and
4. One of the following:
     ECO 321 Economic Institutions and the Competitive System (3), or
     ECO 325 Economic Analysis of Law (3), or
     ECO 331 Public Sector Economics (3), or
     ECO 332 Health Economics (3), or
     ECO 356 Poverty and Income Distribution (3), or
     ECO 361 Labor Economics (3), or
     ECO 385 Government and Business (3), or
     ECO 462 Economics of Compensation (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

EDL 1 Cultural Studies and Public Life. Assists in understanding how culture helps construct public life through deliberate and unwitting actions of people; therefore, reveals one way that you can play an active role in public life of your society. Cultural studies is concerned with the struggles over meaning that reshape and define cultures; therefore, this sequence studies contemporary cultural productions and attempts of people to participate in public life. Emphasis on mass and popular cultures, youth subcultures including minority subcultures such as those associated with African American and Latino cultures.

1. EDL 204 Sociocultural Studies in Education (MPF) (3), or
     PHS 292 Dance, Culture, and Contexts (MPF) (3), or
    COM/ FST 205 American Film as Communication (3); and
2. EDL 282 Culture Studies, Power, and Education (3); and
3. EDL 334 Youth Subcultures, Popular Culture, and the Non-formal Education (3), or
     ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3), or
    SOC/WMS 272 Social Perspectives: Images of Women (3)
Note: Open to all majors. Students must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major

EDP 1 Developmental, Social, and Educational Patterns in Individuals with Exceptionalities. Enhances critical understanding of issues surrounding individuals who fall outside the "norm." Issues include societal values and moral practices related to development, identification, socialization, education, and treatment of these individuals. Explores exceptionality among individuals from the perspectives of psychological "disorder," developmental or educational "difference," and/or "deviance" from socially defined norms. Prerequisite: EDP 101 Psychology of the Learner (MPF) (3), or PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4), or EDP 201 Human Development and Learning (MPF) (3).

1. EDP 256 Psychology of the Exceptional Learner (3); and Two from the following:
     EDP 402 Individuals with Special Gifts and/or Talents: Social, Educational, and Legal Issues (3), or
     EDP 457 Individuals with Mental Retardation (3), or
     EDP 492 Individuals with Severe Behavior Disorders and/or Emotional Disturbance: Social, Educational, and Legal Issues (3), or
     EDP 493 Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities: Social, Educational, and Legal Issues (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Educational Psychology.

ENG 1 Victorian Literature and Culture. Introduces the culture broadly defined as “Victorian” and focuses on the responses of artists, political leaders, and writers to various historical events and movements that have helped shape the 20th and 21st centuries: ideas of progress, democracy, nationalism and imperialism, religious doubt, theories of evolution and natural selection, impressionism and post-impressionism.

1. ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1660-1900 (MPF) (3); and
2.Two courses in any order from the following:
     ENG 343 Victorian Literature, 1830-1860 (3), or
     ENG 344 Victorian Literature, 1860-1900 (3), or
     ART 486 Art of the Late 19th Century (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English. Majors in the Department of Art must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

ENG 2  Women and Literature. Assumes the importance of gender as a category for analyzing authors and texts. Attention to how various literatures that constitute “English literature” represent women and the feminine, how these representations differ, and the various agendas pursued through these representations. Most important, emphasizes women as themselves authors and readers. Builds new knowledge of non-canonical writers and texts; reconsiders canonical writers and texts by focusing on depictions of women or your relation to women’s writings.

1. WMS 201 Introduction to Women’s Studies (MPF) (3), or
    ENG/WMS 368 Feminist Literary Theory and Practice (3); and
2. ENG/WMS 232 American Women Writers (3), or
    ENG/WMS 233 British Women Writers (3); and
3. ENG 390 Studies in American Regionalism: Women’s Local Color Fiction (3), or
    ENG/WMS 468 Gender and Genre (3), or
     ENG 490 Special Topics in Literary Study (3)*, or
    BWS/WMS 410 Special Topics (3)*
     FRE 350B The Woman-Centered Text (3), or
    SPN/WMS 180 Minority Women Writers in the U.S. (3), or
     WMS 370A Black Women Writers (3), or
     WMS 370C Lesbian Fiction (3), or
     WMS 370D Gender, Class, and Culture in 20th Century U.S. (3)
    * ENG 490 and BWS/WMS 410 topics may vary from semester to semester. Consult the sequence coordinator to see if the topic can be applied.
Note: Open to all majors. English majors must enroll in WMS for courses cross-listed with ENG.

ENG 3  American Life and Culture Since World War II. A cross-disciplinary study of the changing forms of American culture since World War II.

1. ENG 143 Life and Thought in American Literature, 1945 to Present (MPF) (3), or
     MUS 135 Understanding Jazz, Its History and Evolution (MPF) (3); and
2. Two courses from the following:
     ARC 427 The American City Since 1940 (3)
     ART 489 Contemporary Art (3)
     ENG 293 Contemporary American Fiction (3)
     ENG 355 American Literature, 1945-Present (3)
    ENG/BWS 338 Contemporary Black American Writers (3)
     HST 223 Assassinations in U.S. History (3)
     HST 367 The U.S. in the 1960s (3)
     HST 369 20th Century America Since 1933 (3)
    HST 380M God, Man, and the Crisis of Modernity (3)
    HST 380X A History of Jewish/Christian Religious Thought in the 1960s (3)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department of major.

ENG 4  Film in Popular Culture. Introduces cultural studies, specifically the analysis of contemporary popular culture. One of the central objectives is to develop analytical tools to examine how film, popular literature, and other mass media (ordinarily “taken for granted” elements of everyday life) have shaped our modern sensibility. In its very nature, the study of popular culture is interdisciplinary, examining both the text and the context of such cultural creations as mass-market literature and film.

1. FST 201 Introduction to Film History and Criticism (MPF) (3); and
2. Two courses from among the following:
    ENG/ FST 220 Literature and Film (3), or
    ENG/ FST 221 Shakespeare and Film (3), or
    ENG/ FST 236 Alternative Traditions in Film (3), or
    ENG/ FST 350A Topics in Film (3),or
    ENG/FST/WMS 350B Topics in Film (3), or
    ENG/ FST 350D The Satiric Film (3), or
    ENG/ FST 350I The Art Film in Italy (3), or
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English.

ENG 5  Language and Literacy. Examines how structure, history, and social aspects of language affect how we learn to write and how schools teach literacy skills. Uses formal reasoning skills, research and writing, and ethnographic case studies to develop a sense of the synchronic structure and diachronic background of the English language so that you understand how concepts of literacy have changed through the ages, how literacy functions in contemporary society, and how societies, schools, and communication technologies interact to shape our concepts of literacy, rhetoric, and language standards. Studies grammatical structure of modern English, social and cultural history of the language, and either rhetorical theory ( COM 239) or contemporary notions of teaching writing ( ENG 304). Although ENG 301 and 302 are recommended to be taken before ENG 304 or COM 239, three courses may be taken in any order.

1. ENG 301 History of the English Language (4); and
2. ENG 302 Structure of Modern English (4); and
3. ENG 304 Backgrounds to Composition Theory and Research (3), or
     COM 239 Rhetorical Theory (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English. Majors in the Department of Communication must select ENG 304.

ENG 6  Modernism. Examines the intellectual and cultural movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries commonly called modernism. In the visual arts, modernism marks the progression from natural representation to abstraction, best shown in the transition from the French impressionists to the cubists. In the literary arts, especially poetry and fiction, modernism moves from the realists and naturalists to the symbolists and imagists, and on to the fugitives and ironists. By taking these courses, you observe the significance of changes in attitude toward experience that are revealed in the transition from an external and objective outlook and expression to a more internal and subjective outlook and expression.

1. ENG 142 Life and Thought in American Literature: Civil War to World War II (MPF) (3), or
     ENG 133 Life and Thought in English Literature: 20th Century (MPF) (3); and
2. ENG 283 Modern Poetry (3), or
     ENG 345 British Modernism (3), or
     ENG 354 American Literature, 1914-1945 (3); and
3. ART 486 Art of the Late 19th Century (3), or
     ART 487 Art of the Early 20th Century (3), or
     HST 332 Europe, 1914-1945 (3), or
    RUS/ ENG 256 Russian Literature in Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of English. Majors in the departments of Art, History, or Russian must select a course outside their department of major at the third level.

ENG 7  The Romantic Era. Through methods and perspectives of at least two disciplines, introduces the culture characterized as “romantic,” which emerged in the later 18th century, flourished in the early 19th century, became domesticated in the Victorian era, was repressed by the modernists, revived by the counterculture of the 1960s, and newly historicized by post-modernists. Focuses on the response of artists and writers to economic, political, and social change (particularly change resulting from industrialism and revolution) and the role of artists and writers in shaping that change. Begin with ENG 132 or RUS 255, then take two of the remaining courses from at least two disciplines.

1. ENG 132 Life and Thought in English Literature, 1660-1901 (MPF) (3), or
    ENG/ RUS 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (MPF) (3); and
2. Two courses from at least two disciplines from the following:
     ENG 339 Writers: Early Romantic Period (3), or
     ENG 342 Writers: Later Romantic Period (3), or
     ART 485 Art of the Early 19th Century (3), or
     FRE 452 The Romantic Movement in French Literature (readings and classes in French) (3), or
     POL 303 Modern Political Philosophy (4)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department of major.

ENG 8  African American History and Literature. Provides a sustained encounter with the African American experience from the arrival of African Americans to North America through their contemporary cultural and literary accomplishments.

1. BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (MPF) (4); and
2. Two from the following:
    BWS/ ENG 336 African American Writing, 1746-1877 (3)
    BWS/ ENG 337 African American Writing, 1878-1945 (3)
    BWS/ ENG 338 African American Writing, 1945 to Present (3)
    BWS/ HST 221 African American History (3)
     ENG 355 American Literature, 1945-Present (3)
Note: Not open to majors in black world studies. English and history majors must complete courses outside their department of major.

ESP 1 Entrepreneurship in Different Contexts. Empasizes the application of entrepreneurial attitudes and behaviors in organizations of all sizes and types. Students explore the underlying nature of entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process and develop an appreciation for the unique aspects of entrepreneurship depending upon the context within which one is operating. The first course examines the role of creative thinking in coming up with new, entrepreneurial ideas and solving business problems; the second explores the interface between entrepreneurship and a particular functional area; the third is concerned with entrepreneurship in a larger, established organizational context.

1. ESP 366 Imagination and Entrepreneurship (3); and
2. MKT 311 Entrepreneurial Marketing (3); and
3. MGT 469 Entrepreneurship in Complex Organizations (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

FRE 1  French Cultural Studies. Explores cultural questions in a French context and how cultural productions can preserve or change social institutions. Provides a continuing analysis of how cultural productions interconnect with specific contexts: historical, aesthetic, social, political, economic, ethnic, racial, gender-related. Prerequisite: FRE 202 Intermediate French (MPF) (3). For students planning to take the French Capstone.

1. FRE 310 Texts in Context (3); and
2. FRE 411 or FRE 411.W French Civilization (4); and
3. FRE 341 or FRE 341.W French Conversation and Current Events (3), or
     FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3), or
     FRE 366 French Cinema in Translation (3), or
     FRE 431 Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation (3), or
     FRE 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of French and Italian.

FRE 2  French Cultural Studies. Students planning to take a Capstone in another department may take any three of these courses, although FRE 310 (or FRE 301 or the equivalent) is a prerequisite for FRE 411.

FRE 310 Texts in Context (3), or
FRE 341 or FRE 341.W French Conversation and Current Events (3), or
FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation (3), or
FRE 366 French Cinema in Translation (3), or
FRE 411 or FRE 411.W French Civilization (4), or
FRE 431 Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation (3), or
FRE 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of French and Italian.

FRE 3  European Cinema. Explores, questions, and seeks to provide a cross-cultural understanding of the historical, ideological, artistic, and social issues that inform European culture through a critical analysis of the major films of countries that have played an important role both in the birth and development of cinematic art and in shaping the modern world: France, Germany, Italy, and the Soviet Union.

1. FST 201 Introduction to Film Criticism and History (MPF) (3), or
     ITS 201 Introduction to International Studies (MPF) (3)
2. Two from the following:
    FRE/ FST 366 French Cinema in Translation (3)
     FRE 460 Topics in French Cinema Study (3)
    FST/ ITL 262 Italian Cinema (3)
    GER/ FST 261 A Survey of German Cinema (3)
    RUS/ FST 263 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department of major.

FSW 1  Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families. Diversity is increasing among children, youth, families, and their community contexts. A growing number of people, especially African American and Hispanic children and their families, are experiencing the challenges of poverty. Increasing numbers of children and youth are deemed “at risk” for health, social, or educational problems. Amidst increasing diversity and confronted by rapid sociocultural change, existing services and supports are often ineffective; sometimes they may harm the people they intend to serve. Sequence provides experiences and opportunities that facilitate your understanding of children, youth, and families, including their needs, problems, aspirations, and strengths. Learn about and evaluate two kinds of services and supports: (1) educative, promotive, and preventive; and (2) need and problem-oriented, as well as crisis-responsive. Experiences in social service, education, and health organizations where you “shadow” helping professionals are required. As a citizen or future helping professional, prepares you for informed advocacy on the behalf of children, youth, and families.

1. FSW/ PHS 207 Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families I (4) and
2. FSW/ PHS 208 Services and Supports for Children, Youth, and Families II (5)
Note: Open to all majors. A minimum of nine semester hours must be taken outside your department of major.

FSW 2 Families in Diverse Contexts. Views U.S. families as diverse and emphasizes the various contexts in which families develop. Historical and comparative roots of families are explored with particular attention to gender and race and socioeconomic issues. Using critical principles, students examine controversial family issues (e.g., men’s and women’s roles, assisted reproduction, adoption, abortion, family values) within contemporary America. Provides an in-depth understanding of at least one important factor (poverty or divorce) that affects contemporary families.

1. FSW 160 Family Relations: Historical and Comparative Analysis (MPF) (3), or
    FSW/ NSG 162 Men in Families (MPF) (3); and
2. FSW 262 Current Controversies (4); and
3. FSW/BWS 362 Family Poverty (3), or
     FSW 461 Marital Distress and Divorce: Implications for Family Life Professionals (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work.

FSW 3 Families and Sexuality Across the Life Course. Provides an overview of family functioning, from the basis of family systems across the life cycle, human sexuality issues, and family relationships in later life. Objectives are: (a) to provide basic concepts and theoretical understandings of families as systems; (b) to provide a sound background in human sexuality that may be used as a base to think about underlying issues related to human sexuality; and (c) to define and describe the family relationships of older persons and review research focusing on family relationships in later life.

1. FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (MPF) (3); and
2. FSW 365 Family Life Sexuality Education Across Cultures (3); and
3. FSW 466 Later Life Families (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work.

FSW 4 Children in Families. Explores the historical and comparative roots of families with particular attention to gender, race, and socioeconomic issues. Examines family differences and family changes over the life course within contemporary U.S. society. Provides an in-depth understanding of at least one important area of individual development (childhood or adolescent development) that affects children in contemporary families.

1. FSW 261 Diverse Family Systems Across the Life Cycle (MPF) (3); and
2. FSW/WMS 381 Perspectives in Parenting (3); and
3. FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (4), or
     FSW 382 Infant and Toddler Caregiving and Supervision (3), or
    EDP/ FSW 481A Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Family Studies and Social Work.

GEO 1  Urban Geography. Applies geographic concepts to develop an understanding of the patterns, processes, and meanings of change within and among U.S. urban areas. The sequence first examines the changing distribution of economic activities and social groups. Second, the sequence is concerned with underlying processes resulting in distinctive distributions of people and activities observed in U.S. urban areas. The sequence also evaluates the problems and consequences for U.S. cities resulting from changing economic and social geography and examines practices and policies for the planning of U.S. urban areas.

1. GEO 201 Geography of Urban Diversity (MPF) (3); and
2. Two of the following:
     GEO 451 Urban and Regional Planning (3), or
     GEO 454 Urban Geography (3), or
    GEO/BWS 455 Race, Urban Change, and Conflict in America (3), or
     GEO 459 Advanced Urban and Regional Planning (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.

GEO 2 Earth’s Physical Environment: Patterns and Processes. Provides an understanding of the geographical patterns that characterize the Earth’s physical environment and the processes responsible for these geographical patterns. The objectives are to study Earth’s physical environment and their geographical distribution at global, regional, and local scales; to develop an understanding of the processes that connect Earth’s physical subsystems, including the lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and atmosphere; and to apply concepts (e.g., systems and budgets) and geographic tools (e.g., field research, geographic information systems, and remote sensing) to the geographic analysis of a particular environment or set of environments.

1. GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environment (MPF) (4); and
2. GEO 221 Regional Physical Environments (3); and
3. GEO 333 Geography of Natural Hazards (3), or
     GEO 421 Climatology (3), or
     GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3), or
     GEO 426 Watershed Management (3), or
     GEO 428 Soil Geography (4), or
     GEO 431 Global Plant Diversity (3), or
     GEO 432 Ecoregions of North America (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.

GEO 3 Geographic Change. Applies geographic concepts to understand patterns, processes, and meaning of change in the human landscape at the global scale.

1. GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (MPF) (3); and
2. GEO 211 Global Change (3); and
3. GEO 436 Women Gender, and the Environment (3); or
     GEO 473 Development and Underdevelopment (3); or
     GEO 475 Third World Urbanization (3).
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.

GEO 4 Global Forces in Regional Contexts. Applies geographic concepts to understanding patterns, processes, and underlying meaning of changes in a region's landscape.

1. GEO 101 Global Forces, Local Diversity (MPF) (3); and
2. GEO 211 Global Change (3); and
3. GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa (4); or
     GEO 304 Latin American Development (4); or
     GEO 308 Geography of East Asia (3); or
     GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3).
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geography.

GER 1  Culture, Literature, and Language of German-Speaking Europe. Explores the way in which culture and language work together as related systems of expression. Course material will be taken, wherever possible, from authentic sources. Prerequisite: GER 202.

1. GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe (MPF) (3), or
     GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and U.S. (MPF) (3); and
2. GER 312 Coming of Age in German Life and Thought (3); or
     GER 311 Passionate Friendships in German Literature, Film, and Culture (MPF) (3); and
3. GER 301 Advanced German Composition (3)
Note: Not open to German majors.

GER 2  Recurrent Themes in German Literature and Film. Proceeding from GER 251 Concepts of the Self (MPF), this sequence expands and deepens the study of themes such as maturation and self; the communal and the solipsistic self; tradition and change; love and family; conceptions of nature, society, and the phenomenology of good and evil. Includes readings from courtly literature, popular literature, and folklore; samples of major playwrights, poets, and prose writers; and film.

1. GER 251 Concepts of the Self (MPF) (3), or
     GER 231 Folk and Literary Fairy Tales (MPF) (3); and
2. HST 472 The Rise and Fall of Hitler (3); and
3. GER/ FST 261 A Survey of the German Cinema (3)
Note: Not open to German majors or majors in the Department of History.

GER 3 Developing Language Skills in German. For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level German language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from fiction, television, film, the Internet, journalism, and memoirs. The courses draw on computer-assisted materials developed by the Miami faculty for Miami students and are characterized by small sections and substantial in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

1. GER 201 Second Year German (3)
2. GER 202 Second Year German (3)
3. GER 301 German Studies Through the Media, Conversation and Composition (3)
Note: Not open to German majors.

GLG 1  Oceanography. Provides an appreciation of the critical importance of the oceans to the functioning of our planet. Oceans dominate the surface area of the Earth, and they are critical to the maintenance of a habitable planet. Examines what we know about the oceans and how the oceans are an integral part of the Earth’s ecology. Explores, first hand, the ways that we study the oceans.

1. GLG 111 Dynamic Earth (MPF) (3), or
     GLG 121 Environmental Geology (MPF) (3), or
     GLG 141 Geology of National Parks (MPF) (3); and
2. GLG 244 Oceanography (3); and
3. GLG 413 Tropical Marine Ecology (5), or
     GLG 414 Coastal Ecology of the Bahamas (5)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology.

GLG 2  The Water Planet. Provides an introduction to the essential role water plays in supporting life on Earth, including the origin of water, its physical/chemical characteristics, how these characteristics combine to make life possible on the continents and in the oceans, and details concerning the hydrologic cycle. Introduces the economic, legal, and political ramifications of water use in the U.S.

1. GEO 121 Earth's Physical Environment (MPF) (3), or
     GLG 111 The Dynamic Earth (MPF) (3), or
     GLG 121 Environmental Geology (MPF) (3), or
     GLG 141 Geology of National Parks (3); and
2. GLG 244 Oceanography (3); and
3. GEO 425 Hydrogeography (3), or
     GLG 207 Water and Society (3), or
     GLG 408 Introduction to Hydrogeology (4), or
     ZOO 463 Limnology (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Geology. Majors in the departments of Geography and Zoology must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

GTY 1 Sociological Perspectives on Aging. Uses a sociological perspective to consider the personal and interpersonal experiences of aging and to analyze the impact of aging on society as a whole. Begins with a general examination of individual and societal aging, and builds toward in-depth exploration of a specific aging-related social institution or issue.

1. GTY 154 Aging in American Society (MPF) (3); and
2. GTY/ SOC 318 Sociology of Aging (3); and
3. GTY/ SOC 435 Sociology of Death (3), or
    GTY/SOC/ WMS 463 Sociology of the Older Woman (3), or
     GTY 466 The Family in Later Life (3)
Note: Not open to sociology or gerontology majors.

GTY 2 Aging in Diverse Contexts. A significant paradigm shift has occurred within gerontology. The accumulation of research findings suggests that age alone predicts very little about the human experience. Instead, the impact of age and aging is mediated by a range of social and cultural factors. Social characteristics such as gender, race, and ethnicity, and societal factors such as economic development and cultural traditions combine to produce a diverse range of experience and patterns of aging. This thematic sequence begins with an overview of the social, cultural, and personal experiences of aging. The second course provides students with grounding in sociocultural analyses of the contexts of aging, and the third, an in-depth exploration of the sources of variation in the aging experience. Students completing this sequence will understand the ways in which meanings and experiences of aging are shaped by social and physical location, and the ways in which diversity among the older population is produced.

1. GTY 154 Aging in American Society (MPF) (3); and
2. GTY 260 Global Aging (3), or
    SOC/ GTY 318 Sociology of Aging (3); and
3. GTY/SOC/ WMS 463 Sociology of the Older Woman (3), or
     GTY 472 Minority Aging (3), or
     GTY 476 Environment and Aging (3)
Note: Not open to majors in Sociology or Gerontology.

HST 1  Medieval Studies. Seeks to enhance your knowledge of and appreciation for the history, art, and literature of the medieval period, as well as establish a full cultural context on which you can build an understanding of more recent history.

Select two courses from the following:
ART 466 Early Christian, Byzantine, and Islamic Art (3), or
ART 467 Early Medieval Art (3), or
ART 468 Romanesque Art (3), or
ART 469 Gothic Art (3), or
ENG 327 Medieval Literature (3), or
HST 345 Survey of Medieval History from 1000 (3), or
And one course from the following:
ART 480M/480W Special Topics in Medieval Art (3), or
ARC 405G Seminar on Gothic Architecture (3), or
HST 346 Medieval Jewish History (3); or
HST 451 Social History of Medieval Europe (3), or
ENG 440 Major English and American Authors (3)*
* ENG 440 topics may vary from semester to semester. Consult with the sequence coordinator or the Office of Liberal Education to see if the topic can be applied.
Note: Majors in architecture, German, art, English, history, and Spanish must select a minimum of nine hours of courses outside their department of major.

HST 2  Women and Gender in History. Studies the construction and nature of gender roles with particular emphasis on women, in a variety of historical contexts, places, cultures, and socioeconomic and political conditions. Encourages thought about whether there are any universal themes and questions regarding gender roles that transcend particular circumstances. Select three courses from these options:

ART 480M Special Topics in Medieval Art (3)
ART 480W Women in Medieval Art (3)
CLS 235 Women in Antiquity (3)
HST/WMS 381 Women in Pre-industrial Europe (3)
HST/AMS/WMS 382 Women in American History (3)
HST 383 Women in Chinese History (3)
HST/ AMS 392 Sex and Gender in American Culture (3)
HST/ WMS 450 Topics in Women’s History (3)
REL/WMS 334 Women’s Religious Experiences in the Mediterranean World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of History. Majors in the departments of Art, Classics, and Comparative Religion must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

IMS 1 Design, Development, and Management of Interactive Media: Business and Engineering Track. Develops the student's theoretical and hands-on understanding of the nature of digital development. Interactive media expertise requires a broad understanding of the perspective brought by many disciplines. These courses are designed to allow the student to focus their education on the Interactive Media aspects of their major. This sequence allows the student to broaden their Interactive Media expertise, developing a particular interest and then applying it in a hands-on interdisciplinary experience. This track focuses on IM development, e-commerce, and Internet marketing. Select courses from these options:

1. IMS 201 Information Studies in the Digital Age (3); and
2. IMS 333 e-Enterprising (3); or
    MGT/ EGM 311 Project Management (3); or
     MIS 381 Analysis and Design of Business Websites (3); or
     MKT 419 e-Commerce, Marketing and the Internet (4); and
3. IMS 410 Digital Project Development Methods: Theory and Practice (4)
Note: Open to all majors, but courses must be taken outside your department of major.

IMS 2 Design, Development, and Management of Interactive Media: Humanities, Arts and Social Science. Develops the student's theoretical and hands-on understanding of the nature of digital development. Interactive media expertise requires a broad understanding of the perspective brought by many disciplines. These courses are designed to allow the student to focus their education on the Interactive Media aspects of their major. This sequence allows the student to broaden their Interactive Media expertise, developing a particular interest and then applying it in a hands-on interdisciplinary experience. This track focuses on IM's role in the humanities, arts, and social sciences, specifically communication, English, psychology, American Studies, and music.

1. ENG/ IMS 171 Humanities and Digital Technology (MPF) (3); or
     IMS 201 Information Studies in a Digital Age (3); or
     WCP 142 Interdisciplinary Technology (MPF) (3); and
2. AMS 310R American Life, Learning, and Digital Media
     COM 211 Introduction to Electronic Media (4); or
     ENG 313 Introduction to Technical Writing (3); or
     MUS 303 Electronic Music (3); or
     PSY 462 Work Space and Work Organization (3); and
3. IMS 410 Digital Project Development Methods: Theory and Practice (4)
Note: Open to all majors, but courses must be taken outside your department of major.

IMS 3 Animation and Game Design. Designed to develop a focused expertise in the theory, processes, and production skills involved in the development of 3D environments in a gaming context. Students will be able to understand the basic terminology and processes involved in 3D design, animation, and game design. Students will develop expertise in "state-of-the-art" 3D design and animation tools and be able to present and discuss underlying concepts and techniques in 3D game design. They will also have a broad understanding of the history and cultural context of 3D game design and development.

1. ARC 404Y Mind and Medium (3)
2. IMS 319 Foundations in 3D Modeling and Animation (3)
3. IMS 445 Game Design (3)
Note: Open to all majors. Course must be taken outside your department of major.

ITL 1 Italy in the Renaissance. Analyzes the vital role Italy has played in the birth and evolution of modern Western culture in the humanities, arts, sciences, and political thought. Develops analytical skills by viewing Italian culture from a variety of disciplinary angles and over a broad span of time. Promotes a critical understanding of the rich artistic, literary, and intellectual heritage of the culture that laid the foundation for the European Renaissance and the modern period. Select three of the following courses in any order:

ARC 405E Renaissance Architecture (3)
ART 481 Italian Renaissance (3)
ENG/ ITL 364 Italian Humanism and the Renaissance (3)
ENG/ ITL 401 Dante's Divine Comedy (3)
HST 315 The Renaissance (3)
HST 452 Florence in the Time of the Republic 1250-1550 (3)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department of major.

JPN 1 Developing Language Skills in Japanese. For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Japanese language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from fiction, television, film, the Internet, journalism, and memoirs. The courses draw on computer-assisted materials developed by Miami faculty for Miami students and are characterized by small sections and substantial in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

1. JPN 201 Second Year Japanese (3)
2. JPN 202 Second Year Japanese (3)
3. JPN 301 Third Year Japanese (3)

LAS 1 Modern Latin American Development. Focuses on broadly defined development in Latin America from the 19th century forward from a central socio-political perspective, and allows students to assess the dynamic nature of political and economic institutions from historical, political, and geographic perspectives. LAS 208, a broad survey course, is recommended to be taken first; however, these courses may be taken in any order as long as nine or more credit hours are completed.

GEO 304 Latin American Development (4)
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization (MPF) (3)
LAS/ IES 414 Latin American Environmental Affairs (3)
POL 337 Politics of Latin America (4)
Note: Nine hours minimum must be taken outside your department of major.

LAS 2 People and Power in the Americas. Provides an interdisciplinary treatment of some of the major social and political issues confronting the Americas now and in the 21st century. Examines the relations and differences between the U.S. and Latin American and Caribbean societies, characterizes and contrasts world views from various social groups across the Americas, explores social conflict within and between countries of the Americas, and addresses such critical issues as human migration and economic integration. Courses are recommended to be taken as listed below; however, three courses may be taken in any order.

ATH 305 Peoples and Cultures of Latin America (3)
GEO 405 The Caribbean in Global Context (3)
LAS 208 Latin American Civilization After 1825 (MPF) (3)
POL 326 Comparative Ethnic Policy (3)
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science. Majors in anthropology or the Department of Geography must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

MBI 1 Biomedical Science. Examines principles and examples of diseases caused by microbial infections so that the role of microorganisms in the development of disease in a human host can be understood. Studies the host at genetic or cell and tissue level to gain an overview of infectious and noninfectious diseases in populations. Fosters understanding of the effects of diseases on human communities and provides a perspective to help evaluate health dilemmas and develop strategies to solve them.

1. MBI 161 Elementary Medical Microbiology (MPF) (4); and
2. BOT/ ZOO 232 Human Heredity (3), or
     ZOO 325 Pathophysiology (4); and
3. MBI 361 Epidemiology (3)
Note: Offered only on the Hamilton and Middletown campuses. Not open to majors in the departments of Microbiology or Zoology.

MBI 2 Molecular Genetics. Provides an understanding of the basic microbiology principles that have provided the foundation for the development of the science of molecular genetics. Shows how the application of molecular genetics has had a significant impact on health, bioremediation, and agriculture, to name a few examples.

1. MBI/BOT/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts: Structure, Function Cellular and Molecular Biology (MPF) (4); and
2. MBI 201 General Microbiology I (4); and
3. MBI 365 Molecular and Cell Biology (2)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Microbiology.

MGT 1 Dynamics of Human Behavior in Organizations. Regardless of major, most students apply the knowledge and skills they acquire at Miami University within an organizational setting. Organizations form to benefit from collective efforts of individuals who are striving to accomplish a set of common goals. This sequence examines ideas, models, and theories that explain human behavior in organizations. Builds competence in critically analyzing factors that influence both human behavior and the capacity for the organization to achieve its objectives; then you are able to influence work behavior and effectively exercise a leadership role in the organizations you join.

1. MGT 291 Organizational Behavior and Theory (3); and Both of the following, in any order:
2. MGT 414 Motivation and Work (3); and
3. MGT 415 Leadership and Learning (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MIS 1 Information Management, Technology, and the Role of Electronic Commerce. Emphasizes the critical role of information and decision-making within a distributed Internet environment and enables students to develop a proficiency in the management evaluation and development of information systems that promote and implement electronic commerce technology. The sequence provides depth of course wor k in management information systems emerging applications and technology and focuses on technology management and adoption issues by organizations in order to gain a competitive advantage in the new Internet society. While the academic area of business forms the sequence's contextual orientation, technology and the applications discussed and ways of thinking and analyzing presented are applicable to a variety of organizational contexts.

1. MIS 235 Information Technology in Modern Organizations (3); and
2. MIS 381 Analysis and Design of Business Web Sites (3); and
3. MIS 385 Applications of Electronic Commerce Technology (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MIS 2 Applications Integration with Enterprise Systems. Emphasizes the critical role of information resources planning, management, and/or implementation in the electronic commerce era. In specific, this sequences enables students to develop a proficiency in the management of enterprise resources planning tools, concepts, and/or techniques to increase corporations' productivity, operational efficiency, and effectiveness. Please take these courses in order.

1. MIS 235 Information Technology in Modern Organizations (3)
2. MIS 302 Database Theory and Practice (3)
3. MIS 303 Enterprise Systems (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MIS 3 Web Mining and Knowledge Management. Emphasizes the critical role of information management and decision-making within a wireless, distributed Internet environment and enables students to develop a proficiency in knowledge management, Internet access/retrieval, and web searching/mining of information and data that promotes and enhances the e-commerce opportunity and the digital economy. The sequence focuses on technology management, strategic evaluation, and systems adoption issues by organizations in order to gain a competitive advantage in the new Internet society and associated wireless environment. Please take these courses in order.

1. MIS 235 Information Technology in Modern Organizations (3)
2. MIS 302 Database Theory and Practice (3)
3. MIS 404 Knowledge Management (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MKT 1 Marketing Research. Focuses on understanding the nature and extent of marketing research activities in both the private and public sectors and developing skills in assessing the validity, reliability, and measurement precision of a broad range of research findings. The sequence develops systematically, by first grounding the student in marketing principles, developing critical thinking skills in marketing analysis, and finally integrating that knowledge in the practicum-oriented marketing research course.

1. MKT 291 Marketing Principles (3); and
2. MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (3); and
3. MKT 335 Marketing Research (4)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MKT 2 Promotion and Persuasion. Leads to an understanding of how persuasion works, what makes persuasive communications effective, and how promotion and other persuasive communications can be used to influence human behavior and introduce new concepts to target audiences.
1. MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3); and
2. MKT 325 Consumer Behavior (4); and
3. MKT 435 Branding and IMC (4)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MKT 3 Retailing in a Global Environment. Focuses on understanding the functions and activities of retailing in both domestic and foreign settings; understanding both theory and practical application in the retailing function; how retailing influences and is influenced by its human and physical environment; and the role of interpersonal communications in the retailing function.

1. MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3); and
2. MKT 305 Principles of Supply Chain Management (3); or
     MKT 431 Logistics Management (3); and
3. MKT 415 Marketing to Organizations (4)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MKT 5 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing. The objectives of this sequence are to: 1. introduce students to the behavioral, sociological, psychological, and economic foundations behind marketing; 2. create an understanding of how marketing can improve the quality of life through enlightened personal selling; and 3. assist non-marketing majors to apply marketing concepts to a broad spectrum of personal and professional careers.

1. MKT 291 Principles of Marketing (3); and
2. MKT 315 Creating Customer Value Through Marketing (3); and
3. MGT 325 Consumer Behavior (3)
Note: Not open to majors in business.

MME 3 The Art and Science of Engineering Thinking: A Design-Based Approach to Creative Problem-Solving. Allows students to know and comprehend the art and science of the engineering thinking process. Enables students to discover the core of the logical problem-solving process used by engineers in design. Also, students will understand the nature of reasoning, characteristic ways of thinking, and methods of inquiry that distinguish the discipline of engineering. Engineering thinking combines art and science, intuition and logic, observation and experimentation; it is a creative activity that requires critical thinking, careful synthesis, comprehensive analysis, and skillful implementation. At the conclusion of the sequence, students should be able to integrate engineering thinking creatively into their work when solving problems.

1. MME 143 Engineering Design and Computer Graphics (3); and
2. MME 211 Static Modeling of Mechanical Systems (3); and
3. ECE 203 Electric Circuit Analysis (4); and
4. MME/ ECE 303 Computer-Aided Experimentation (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering.

MTH 1 Axioms, Theorems, and Proof in Geometry and Algebra. Considers algebras and geometries defined by axiomatic systems, two very active fields in modern mathematics. Surprises are here: geometrics without parallel lines, geometrics with parallel lines and no rectangles, and new algebraic operations that can describe the structure of Rubik’s cube and molecules. Develops the roles of definition, proof, and abstraction gradually until, at the 400 level, a full scale axiomatic treatment is given. At this level students provide many of the proofs. You rediscover results from the masters: Gauss, Hilbert, Galois, Abel, and others. Not an easy sequence, but you learn about how to read mathematics and solve problems on your own. Prerequisite: MTH 151 (5) (MPF) or MTH 153 (4) (MPF) Calculus I.

1. MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3); and
2. MTH 331 Discrete Mathematics (3); and
3. MTH 411 Foundations of Geometry (3), or
     MTH 421 Introduction to Abstract Algebra (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

MTH 2  Basic Mathematical Tools for Science. Scientists today use a variety of mathematical tools, including calculus, discrete mathematics, and statistics to describe physical, biological, and social systems. These mathematical subjects are developed in separate Foundation courses, but the development is stronger because the last two courses are built on the foundation of Calculus I. Helps students with interests in the sciences better understand and apply some of the mathematical and statistical models used in these disciplines.

1. MTH 151 Calculus I (MPF) (5), or
     MTH 153 Calculus I (MPF) (4); and
2. MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3); or
     MTH 231 Discrete Mathematics (3); or
     MTH 222T Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors) (3); or
     MTH 231T Discrete Mathematics (Honors) (3); and
3. STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
     STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Business majors will not receive credit for this sequence.

MTH 3  Almost Linear Structures—Models for Physical Science. The goal is to extend the derivative and antiderivative ideas from Calculus I and II by building on the linear function concept from MTH 222. Scientists use linear functions to model the economy, atomic structure, chemical reactions, and other phenomena. MTH 252 develops the derivative of a multivariable function as an approximating linear function, just as the graph of a function of one variable looks like a line segment near a point where the derivative exists. This allows the extension of important optimization techniques to multivariable functions. MTH 347 uses all available tools to generalize and solve antiderivative problems crucial to science. This sequence combines theory and practice and is the traditional path to upper division mathematics. MTH 222 and 252 may be taken in either order or concurrently. Prerequisite: Calculus I (MPF) and Calculus II.

1. MTH 222 Introduction to Linear Algebra (3); or
     MTH 222T Introduction to Linear Algebra (Honors) (3); or
     MTH 331T Discrete Mathematics (Honors) (3); and
2. MTH 252 Calculus III (4); and
3. MTH 347 Differential Equations (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics.

MUS 1  Performance of Music. Study and apply music performance in solo and ensemble settings in order to examine and evaluate musical style, emotional and programmatic aspects of composition in performance, the interrelationship of instruments in larger contexts, and the involvement of personal technique, style, and emotional context. Prerequisite: Not for beginning performers. Admission only to students granted “sophomore standing” by the music department after an audition or semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 142 or 144.

1. Three semesters minimum of private study, including at least one semester at 300-level with a prerequisite of “junior standing” granted by the music department after a semester-end jury following enrollment in MUS 242 or 244.
Courses available:
     MUS 242, 342 (2)
    MUS 244, 344 (3-4)
2. Four hours minimum of ensemble. No more than two hours per semester may be applied. MUS 106.B Marching Band cannot fulfill this requirement. You are encouraged to be involved in more than one ensemble for the duration of the sequence.
3. Juried half-recital (20 minutes of music minimum) given in your junior or senior year (0). The recital must be a lecture-recital or must have program notes written by you.
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

MUS 2 Music Composition. Focuses on composing from selected perspectives: (1) strict models of the receding past (early 19th century), (2) traditions in the electronic music of the recent past, (3) conventional forms from the current mass media, and (4) personal models developed by the student. Students study primarily the music of Western culture and write their own compositions. Designed for students already having both experience in performance on an instrument or voice and an understanding of a basic musical language through conventional music theory studies.

1. MUS 301 Counterpoint (3), and
2. MUS 303 Electronic Music (3), and
3. MUS 371 Composition (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

MUS 3 African and African-Derived Music in the Western World. Focuses on the development and influence of African-derived music in the western world, which includes not only North America but also the Carribean and South America. The subject is examined from several historical as well as musical perspectives: (1) African music in the traditional context and its defining factors on the lives and culture of Western African societies and people; (2) The Atlantic slave trade and the development of African-influenced genres in the West; (3) The impact of the development of and changes in Western societies (i.e., emancipation, segregation, unemployment, etc.) and the music that results . At the conclusion of this sequence, students should be able to integrate the material covered into their knowledge of American musical and social history and have a deeper understanding of how societal structures and racial identity have affected music.

1. MUS 285 Survey of African Music in the Diaspora (3); and
2. MUS 385 The Roots of Black Music: Blues, Gospel, and Soul (3); and
3. MUS 386 The History and Development of Hip-Hop Culture in America (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Music.

NSC 1  Naval Science: History of Warfare. Examines the evolution of strategic principles and the influence of economic, psychological, moral, political, and technological factors on strategic thought. Covers the evolution of warfare from 600 B.C. to present, naval warfare from 1500 to present, and amphibious warfare from 1800 to present. Through literature, you are exposed to differing perspectives, including official records of the event, personal experiences of participants, and post-event analysis by researchers. Engage in a critical analysis of great captains, military organizations, and military theorists of history.

1. NSC 311 The Evolution of Warfare (3); and
2. NSC 202 Seapower and Maritime Affairs Seminar (3); and
3. NSC 411 Amphibious Warfare (3)
Note: Open to all majors.

NSC 2  War: An Extension of Politics. Examines world politics, historical role played by the military in the outcome of those politics, and possible political methods to avoid future military action. Explores the complexity of world politics driven by differences in economics, population, culture, and philosophy, and studies the historical outcome of incidents where military action occurred as well as those incidents resolved without military involvement.

1. POL 271 World Politics (MPF) (4), or
     POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3), or
     HST 219 U.S. Diplomatic History to 1914 (3), or
     HST 222 U.S. Diplomatic History Since 1914 (3); and
2. NSC 202 Seapower and Maritime Affairs Seminar (3), or
     NSC 311 The Evolution of Warfare (3), or
     NSC 411 Amphibious Warfare (3); and
3. POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3), or
     POL 374 Comparative Foreign Policies (3), or
     POL 381 Global Governance (3), or
     POL 382 International Law (3), or
     HST 275 20th Century European Diplomacy (3), or
    HST/ENG/PSY 360C Interdisciplinary Special Topics: Alternatives to War (4), or
     HST 431 The U.S. - Vietnam War (3)
Note: Students must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

NSC 3  The Naval Sciences: An Integrated Study of Naval Engineering, Navigation, and Piloting. Going to sea and surviving for extended periods of time require unique and diverse knowledge in the subject areas. Engages in a critical examination of naval engineering systems, celestial and electronic navigation, and the practice of safely piloting a waterborne vessel.

1. NSC 102 Naval Ship’s Systems (3); and
2. NSC 301 Navigation I (4); and
3. NSC 302 Navigation II (3)
Note: Open to all majors.

PCE 1  Chemical Engineering Principles. Provides an understanding of basic chemical engineering principles, concepts, and methodologies and how they are applied to the design and performance analysis of industrial processes. Prerequisite: ( PCE 204) grade of C- or better in CHM 141, 142; MTH 151, 251.; and CSA 141 or competence in spreadsheeets. (MME/ PCE 313) grade of C- or better in PHY 182, and PCE 204. ( PCE 403) grade of C- or better in MME/ PCE 313, MTH 245, and MME/ PCE 314.

1. PCE 204 Material and Energy Balances (3); and
2. MME/ PCE 313 Fluid Mechanics (3); and
3. PCE 403 Heat Transfer (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Paper and Chemical Engineering. Majors in the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering must take PCE 313 at the second level.

PHL 1  Applied Ethics. Develops insight and expertise in dealing with ethical matters that you are likely to confront in your personal and professional life beyond the university.

1. PHL 131 Problems of Moral and Social Values (MPF) (3); and
2. PHL 312 Contemporary Moral Problems (4); and
3. PHL/WMS 355 Feminist Theory (4), or
    PHL/ENG/PSY/ REL 360.A Confronting Death (4), or
     PHL 375 Moral Issues in Health Care (4), or
     PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy. Students must select nine hours outside the department of major.

PHL 4  Metaphysics and Epistemology. Presents a range of philosophical outlooks and methods regarding the fundamental questions: what is real and how do we know it? Explores these questions as they are manifested in the history of philosophy.

1. PHL 101 Knowledge of World, God, and Morality (MPF) (3), or
     PHL 104 Purpose or Chance in the Universe (MPF) (3), or
     PHL 105 Theories of Human Nature (MPF) (3); and
2. PHL 221 Problems of Metaphysics and Knowledge (3); and
3. PHL 301 Ancient Philosophy (4), or
     PHL 302 Modern Philosophy (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHL 5  Reasoning. Focuses on the fundamental aspects of logic, as manifested in thought and language. Shows that reasoning occurs in both formal and interpretive modes, and that principles exist for the analysis and evaluation of reasoning in these modes. The emphasis is on developing skill in the application of such principles and on an appreciation of the overall scope of logic.

1. PHL 273 Formal Logic (MPF) (4); and
2. PHL 263 Informal Logic (4); and
3. PHL 373 Symbolic Logic (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Philosophy.

PHS 1  Biophysical Health Across the Life Span. As one ages, the body changes in physical appearance, health, and ability to perform, usually in a negative way. Certain aspects of the aging body are regulated by factors beyond our control (e.g., genetics); however, lifestyle (e.g., nutrition, exercise) from birth to adulthood influences biophysical health to a large extent. Learn how biophysical health can be improved, maintained, or impaired by factors beyond and within one’s control over time. Explore reasons for the systematic patterns of the unequal distribution of health and health services among persons of different age, gender, socioeconomic status, and culture.

1. PHS 188/188L Exercise and Health (MPF) (3,1); and
2. PHS 297 Children’s Exercise and Fitness (3), or
     PHS 407 Food and Nutrition for the Aging (3), or
     PHS 408 Perinatal and Child Nutrition (3); and
3. NSG 441 Health and Aging: Current Perspectives and Issues (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Physical Education, Health, and Sport Studies or Nursing.

PHY 1  The Physical World: Contemporary Physics. Option One—experimental emphasis, stresses experimental, hands-on experience in the laboratory. Option Two—theoretical emphasis, stresses modelling and simulation approaches to problem solving. Extends the basic foundation in the broad area of physics developed in “The Physical World.” Provides in-depth developments of topics in modern and contemporary physical science. The goal is to provide a level of understanding and skills in contemporary scientific methodology to enable further study in the sciences or to provide a substantial technical background for a future career.

1. PHY 182, 184 The Physical World II and Laboratory (MPF) (4,1); and
2. PHY 291, 293 Contemporary Physics and Laboratory (4, 2); and
3. Experimental Option: PHY 292, 294 Electronic Instrumentation (3, 2), or Theoretical Option: PHY 286 Introduction to Computational Physics (3)
Note: Although laboratory sections are listed as separate courses in this Bulletin, they are integral corequisites to the companion courses. Not open to majors in the Department of Physics.

PHY 2 Your Place In the Universe. For untold generations, humans have gazed at the stars, planets, and cosmos, and asked what is it all, and how do I fit in? This sequence attempts to address this timeless, universal, and totally human question from the viewpoint of modern science. The Foundation course provides an overview of our present understanding of the universe and some insight as to how we came to such an understanding. The second course addresses the crucial question, how do we know what we claim to know? Here, the observational foundation of our theories are examined in detail. The final course addresses several topics from astronomy that currently are without explanation.

1. PHY 111 Astronomy and Space Physics (MPF) (3); and
2. PHY 211 Observational Foundations of Astronomy (3); and
3. PHY 311 Contemporary Astronomy (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Physics.

POL 1  Comparative Analysis of Foreign Policy. Explores the study and substance of foreign policy. The sequence begins by analyzing the broader international and theoretical contexts of foreign policy, then moves into finer analysis of particular issues confronting national governments in the construction and pursuit of their foreign policy objectives. Completes the sequence with a country or region-specific course that examines in greater detail theories, contexts, and issues explored in earlier courses.

1. POL 271 International Politics (MPF) (4); and
2. POL 374 Comparative Foreign Policies (3), or
     POL 387 Comparative Security Issues (3); and
3. POL 373 American Foreign Policy (3), or
     POL 375 International Relations of East Asia (3), or
     POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy (3), or
     POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

POL 3  National Political Institutions. Enables you to understand the political system in which you live, how it operates or fails to do so, where and how citizen influence is applied, and how to assess proposals for reform. Take POL 141 first, then select three additional courses from the options listed. Sequence of four courses.

POL 141 The American Political System (MPF) (4); and
POL 343 American Presidency (3)
POL 344 U.S. Congress (3)
POL 352 Constitutional Law and Politics (4)
POL 356 Mass Media and Politics (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Political Science.

PSY 1  Perspectives on Psychopathology. Uses a psychological perspective to consider the personal and interpersonal experience of psychopathology and to analyze the impact of psychopathology on society as a whole. Begins with a general examination of individual and social psychopathology and builds toward in-depth exploration of selected specific individual or social issues related to psychopathology. Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4).

1. PSY 242 Abnormal Psychology (3); and
2. PSY 343 Psychopathology (3); and
3. PSY 345 Childhood Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.

PSY 2 Patterns in Human Development. Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change. How does our biological makeup interact with our physical and social surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A scientific approach to developmental psychology requires us to think critically in examining theories and research and to understand the contexts in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and research are conducted. Engage with other learners as you reflect on ideas about why we develop the way we do. Such reflection provides an informed basis for acting on issues affecting children, youth, families, and elders. Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4), or EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (MPF) (3).

1. PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3), or
     EDP 356 Human Development (3); and The second and third courses must be selected in order of their postion in the life span, as follows:
2. PSY 332 Child Development (3), or
     FSW 281 Child Development in Diverse Families (3); and
3. PSY 333 Adolescent Development (3), or
    FSW/ EDP 481 (481A) Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3) or
2. PSY 333 Adolescent Development (3), or
    FSW/ EDP 481 Adolescent Development in Diverse Families (3); and
3. PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in the Department of Educational Psychology and Department of Family Studies and Social Work must choose a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

PSY 4  Developmental Patterns in Adulthood. Throughout life, our thoughts, feelings, and behaviors change. Adulthood and aging are a culmination of lifespan development. How does our biological makeup interact with our physical and social surroundings to contribute to our actions and abilities? A scientific approach to the study of aging requires us to think critically in examining theories and research and to understand the contexts in which we develop and the contexts in which theories and research are conducted. Prerequisite: PSY 111 Introduction to Psychology (MPF) (4), or EDP 101 Critical Issues in the Psychology of the Learner (MPF) (3).

1. PSY 231 Developmental Psychology (3), or
     EDP 356 Human Development (3), and
2. PSY 334 Adulthood and Aging (3); and
3. PHS 471 Sport, Leisure, and Aging (4), or
     GTY 466 The Family in Later Life (3), or
     GTY 472 Minority Aging (3), or
    SOC/GTY/ WMS 463 Sociology of the Older Woman (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology. Majors in the Departments of Educational Psychology, Physical Education, Health, and Sport Studies, and Sociology and Gerontology must select a minimum of nine hours outside their department of major.

PSY 5  Cognition: Understanding and Improving Thought. Offers opportunity to reflect upon reasoning, those processes used to create, maintain, modify, and evaluate beliefs about the world. Begins by introducing the study of cognition within the discipline of psychology; the second course emphasizes specific cognitive processes (e.g., language) and methods and theories associated with their study; the third course offers an in-depth analysis of current theories and methods of studying cognition within a circumscribed topic area.
1. PSY 271 Cognition (3); and
2. PSY 372 Learning and Cognition (4), or
     PSY 374 Psychology of Language and Thought (3); and
3. PSY 470 Seminar in Cognition (3); or
     PSY 471 Spatial Cognition (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Psychology.

REL 1  Religion and American Life. Acquaints you with fundamental themes in the relationship between religion and society, as exemplified in the development of American religious pluralism in theory and practice, as well as in the impact of religious themes in the development of an American cultural identity.

1. REL 101 Varieties of Religious Expression (MPF) (3), or
     REL 102 Religion and Modern Culture (MPF) (3), or
     REL 103 Religion, History and Society (MPF) (3); and
2. Two of the following:
    AMS/ REL 241 Religions of the American Peoples (4), or
    AMS/ REL 242 Religious Pluralism in Modern America (4); and
    AMS/ REL 341 Protestantism and the Development of American Culture (4), or
    AMS/ REL 442 Religion, Society, and Culture in New England (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

REL 2  The Historical and Comparative Study of Religion. Uses the approach of the history of religions to provide perspective continuity and depends heavily on the study and interpretation of classical foreign-language texts in English translation, while using case studies, surveys, and field reports. Unlike some sequences in the humanities that concentrate on religious ideas and doctrines, this sequence utilizes categories developed from the field of comparative religion to acquaint students with the diversity of religious phenomena. Emphasizes the importance of studying religion in a comparative and global context; allows a choice of emphasis of either major Eastern or Western religious traditions, at the second level.

1. REL 101 Varieties of Religious Expression (MPF) (3); and
2. REL 202 Religions of Asia (3), or
     REL 211 Religions of the Hebrew Bible (3); and
3. REL 302 Methods for the Study of Religion (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

REL 3 Religion and Philosophy of Buddhist Asia. Seeks to give students a firm grounding in the patterns of thought, symbolism, and behavior originating in and associated with Buddhism. Students follow the path of Buddhism from its birth in Upanishadic India to its function as a bridge culture knitting together much of Asia.

1. PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India and South Asia (MPF) (3); and
2. REL 323 Buddhism in India and South Asia (3); and
3. REL 324 Buddhism in China, Korea, and Japan (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the departments of Philosophy or Comparative Religion.

REL 5 Jewish Civilization Through History. Acquaints students with the history of the Jewish people through their religious culture, social ideas, and political institutions; helps students understand the distinctive forms of Jewish ethnic self-identity as they have developed through history; and helps students appreciate both the positive and negative aspects of the interaction of Jews with Christians and Muslims in a variety of geographical and cultural settings.

1. HST 346 Medieval Jewish History (3); or
     REL 211 Religions of the Hebrew Bible (3), or
     REL 213 Social and Religious History of the Jewish People (MPF) (3); and
2. Two of the following:
     REL 385 The Religious Roots of Anti-Semitism (3), or
     REL 388 Jerusalem: The Meeting of Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Holy City (3), or
     REL 465 The Holocaust (4), or
     REL 475 Judaism in Modern Israel (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Comparative Religion.

RUS 1 Russia and the Soviet Union. Examines Russian culture, society, and politics from an interdisciplinary perspective, including major Russian literary works, historical patterns, and political leaders and parties from the 10th century to the present. By considering this interaction, you gain meaningful insights into the development of Russia as well as acquire useful perspectives on Western society.

1. RUS/ ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (MPF) (3), or
    RUS/ ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation: From Tolstoy to Nabokov (3); and
2. HST 374 Russia to 1855 (3), or
     HST 375 Russia and the USSR from 1855 to the Present (3); or
    HST 470 Topics in Russian History (3); or
     HST 475 Images of Russia At Home and Abroad: 16th Century to Present (3); and
3. POL/RUS 230 Topics in Russian Culture and Civilization (3); or
     POL 331 Development of the Soviet Polity (3), or
     POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics (3), or
     POL 430B Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe (4)
Note: Not open to Russian majors or majors in the Departments of History or Political Science.

RUS 2 Russian Culture. Examines Russian culture from the point of view of artistic media, including major literary works, films, and varieties of folkloric expression. Russian folklore, film, and literature often explore some of the same issues, central to the society they reflect, like rebellion and revolution, alienation and the creation of a community, and the intricacies of social and sexual relationships. Through the study of diverse elite and popular approaches to these topics, you gain an appreciation of some pervasive Russian attitudes and concerns.

1. RUS 137 Russian Folklore (MPF) (3), or
    RUS/ ENG 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation (MPF) (3); and
2. RUS/ ENG 256 Russian Literature in English Translation: Tolstoy to Nabakov (3), or
     RUS 257 Russian Literature in English Translation: Pasternak to Present (3); and
3. FST/ RUS 263 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema (3)
Note: Not open to Russian majors.

RUS 3 Developing Language Skills in Russian. For students who have completed the first two semesters of college-level Russian language or the equivalent. This sequence develops speaking, listening, reading, and writing ability using a variety of materials drawn from textbooks, fiction, the Internet and journalism as well as multimedia. The courses are characterized by small sections and in-class and out-of-class interaction. Courses may not be taken credit/no-credit and must be taken in order.

1. RUS 201 Intermediate Russian (3); and
2. RUS 202 Intermediate Russian (3); and
3. RUS 301 Advanced Russian (3).
Note: Not open to Russian majors.

SBI 1 Summer Business Institute for Non-Business Majors/Minors. Students will acquire a basic understanding of how businesses and people work together, providing synergy with the student's chosen major. Six-week program is designed to help talented non-business students develop a clear advantage in the competitive job market. The sequence assumes that you have no prior knowledge of business topics and is intended to make business learning interesting, accessible, and valuable to students in all majors. Prerequisite: Students must have 60 hours of college credit and permission of the instructor.

Take these three courses:
BUS 301 Macro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3)
BUS 302 Micro Concepts in Contemporary Business (3)
BUS 303 Business Process Integration (3)
Note: Not open to students with majors or minors in business.

SDT 1 Self-Designed Thematic Sequence. The purpose of the self-designed thematic sequence is to provide students with the opportunity to design a specialized thematic sequence beyond those that are currently offered. This sequence should be based on the student's interests, career, goals, and intellectual interests. A proposal must be submitted to the Office of Liberal Education for approval (229 Culler Hall or visit www.muohio.edu/led).

SOC 2 Applied Social Science Methods. Emphasizes the applied dimensions of social research, and reviews the basic methodologies social scientists employ in their research. Although you receive exposure to the techniques involved, emphasis is on the thinking processes involved in doing social research and in applying research findings. Learn how to frame questions, link them to basic concepts in sociology and anthropology, how to decide on appropriate methodologies, how to examine data, and how to link the results of research to theoretical and applied issues. Prerequisite: Either SOC 151 (MPF) (3) or SOC 152 (MPF) (4) or ATH 155 (MPF) (3).

1. SOC 262 Research Methods (4); and
2. ATH 265 Language and Culture (3); and
3. ATH 411 Applied Anthropology (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Sociology and Gerontology or the Department of Anthropology.

SOC 3 Sociological Perspectives on Inequality. Uses a sociological perspective to approach the issues of social, political, and economic inequality in contemporary society, paying particular attention to inequality as it is determined by class, race, and gender. Begins with an examination of theories of social stratification; then follows a sequence of courses that allows you to develop an in-depth understanding of the major dimensions of social inequality. Prerequisite: SOC 151 Social Relations (MPF) (3) or SOC 152 (MPF) (4) or BWS 151 Introduction to Black World Studies (MPF) (4).

1. SOC/WMS 203 Sociology of Gender (3); and
2. BWS/ SOC 348 Race and Ethnic Relations (3), or
    BWS/ SOC 448 The African American Experience (3); and
3. SOC 372 Social Stratification (3), or
     SOC 411 Social Conflict (3), or
     SOC 417 Economy and Society (3)
Note: Not open to sociology or gerontology majors.

SOC 4 Sociological Perspectives on Criminality and Deviance. Students will use the social dynamics of history and a sociological perspective to understand and critique conformity, crime, deviance, and the justice system in contemporary society, paying particular attention to the social construction of legality, normality, and crime as influenced by various cultural contexts. The sequence begins with an examination of the basic theories and components of deviance/conformity, then follows a sequence of courses that allows them to examine and develop an understanding of the criminology field and concludes with an advanced course. Students must apply for this Thematic Sequence; enrollment is limited.

1. SOC 202 Social Deviance (4); and
2. SOC 352 Criminology (3); and
3. SOC 409 Systems of Justice (3), or
     SOC 410 Topics in Criminology (3), or
     SOC 413 Juvenile Delinquency (3)
Note: Not open to sociology or gerontology majors.

SPA 2 Exploring Social Emotional and Communication Consequences in Special Populations. Offers students the opportunity to develop insight into: (1) the problems facing physically, mentally, communicatively, culturally, or socially challenged individuals in our society; (2) the development of structures and environments needed for such individuals to communicate effectively, and (3) how these environmental modifications can be implemented. Provides specific information on recognizing and treating physical and communicative disorders, with emphasis placed on those problems that impact the normal development of speech, hearing, and language.

1. SPA 127 Introduction to Communication Disorders (3); and
2. EDP 256 Psychology of Learners with Exceptionalities (3); or
     SPA 233 Perspectives of the Human Face (3); and
3. SPA 427 Alternative Communication Systems for the Severely Handicapped (2); and
     SPA 427L Laboratory Experience in Alternative Communication Systems for the Severely Handicapped (1); or
     EDP 493 Individuals with Specific Learning Disabilities: Social Educational, and Legal Issues (3).
Note: Not open to speech pathology and audiology majors. Special education majors must take all SPA courses (nine hours minimum outside department of major).

SPN 1  Literature and Culture in Spain. Focuses on the literature of Spain, exploring the interrelationships among texts, history, and culture. SPN 313, a Foundation course, emphasizes skills in the analysis and interpretation of Spanish texts; SPN 413 explores social and historical circumstances (Christian reconquest, rise of monarchy, colonialism, tradition, and modernity) as represented in Spanish literature; SPN 420 engages in an in-depth exploration of an important cultural theme in Spanish literature, such as explorations of national identity, medieval and Golden Age views of love, urban versus rural culture, and the literature of the Spanish civil war. Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.

Important: At the time of printing, this thematic sequence is undergoing revision. For current course listings, please visit www.muohio.edu/led.

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

SPN 2  Literature and Culture in Spanish America. Focuses on the literature of Spanish America, exploring the interrelationships among texts, history, and culture. SPN 314, a Foundation course, emphasizes skills in the analysis and interpretation of Spanish American texts; SPN 414 explores social and historical circumstances (colonialism, national independence, and issues of national development) as represented in Spanish American literature; SPN 430 provides an in-depth exploration of a central cultural theme in Spanish American literature, such as women in colonial Spanish America, ethnicity in literature, and the literature of revolution. Prerequisite: SPN 311. Courses must be taken in order.

Important: At the time of printing, this thematic sequence is undergoing revision. For current course listings, please visit www.muohio.edu/led.

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

SPN 3  Spanish Linguistics and Culture. Focuses on the study of language as a sign of cultural identity and as a social marker. Although the focus is on Spanish, the general goal is to develop the ability to think critically about the connection between language and the social and cultural contexts in which it develops and exists. Learn to collect and interpret linguistic data, discuss historical events and conditions that have determined the evolution of Spanish dialects and the establishment of a standard, and evaluate current linguistic conflicts in the Spanish-speaking world.

Important: At the time of printing, this thematic sequence is undergoing revision. For current course listings, please visit www.muohio.edu/led.

Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

STA 1  Quality Issues in Contemporary Business and Industry. Provides sufficient understanding of the factors influencing quality and organizational productivity. Upon completion, you should be able to critically examine work systems and play a leading role in the improvement of any work process in which you are involved. Key themes include: data based decision-making, use of statistical tools for process analysis and quality improvement, measurement of quality, Total Quality Management, quality leadership, employee involvement, and the relationship between work processes and quality improvement systems.

1. DSC 205 Business Statistics (4), or
     STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
     STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4); and
2. MGT 302 Introduction to Operations and Supply Chain Management (3); and
3. DSC/ STA 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
     MME 334 Quality Planning and Control (3); and
4. MGT 453 Productivity Improvement (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Management. Majors in the departments of Decision Sciences and Management Information Systems; Manufacturing and Mechanical Engineering; and Mathematics and Statistics must select a minimum of nine hours from outside their department of major.

STA 2  Applied Statistics. Provides a basic understanding of the statistical data analysis procedures of estimation and hypothesis testing and their use in data-based decision making. Based primarily on the “classical” assumptions of random sampling and normal distributions, data analysis applications range from one and two population problems to more complex problems of rMMEession and design of experiments. The first course, chosen from three options, introduces additional statistical procedures that go beyond the “classical” assumptions. Considers examples from a variety of disciplines and life experiences and employs statistical software extensively.

1. STA 261 Statistics (MPF) (4), or
     STA 301 Applied Statistics (3), or
     STA 368 Introduction to Statistics (4); and
2. STA 363 Regression and Design of Experiments (3); and
3. STA/ DSC 333 Nonparametric Statistics (3), or
    STA/ DSC 365 Statistical Quality Control (3), or
    STA/ DSC 432 Survey Sampling in Business (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics. Majors in decision science and management information systems must select a statistics course at the third level.

THE 1  Modern Theatre and Drama. Study of the influences, backgrounds, playwrights, and theatre artists that have brought about contemporary theatre production practice, style, and dramaturgy. The eclecticism of 20th century theatre reflects the shifting realities of science, culture, politics, and aesthetics in a way that mirrors our attempts to understand ourselves and our world. The objective is to reach an integrative knowledge of the connectedness of art and society to understand how in creating an image of our lives, in forging new realities, in exploring new forms and styles, theatre artists have helped define our response to the world and our experience.

1. THE 101 Theatre Production I: Theory and Analysis (MPF) (3); and
     THE 103 Theatre Production I Laboratory (MPF) (1); or
     THE 191 Theatre Appreciation (MPF) (3); and
2. Two from the following:
     THE 391 Modern American Theatre (3)
     THE 392 Modern European Theatre (3)
     THE 393 Cultural, Ethnic, and Gender Issues in Dramatic Literature (3)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Theatre.

WMS 1 Women and the World. This sequence focuses on understanding women's historical and contemporary socio-cultural and political realities from an international perspective. Students will learn to use gender as a category of analysis, to understand complex issues and processes related to an increasingly interconnected world system and the ways women and gender are implicated in these processes, and to apply this knowledge to the topical issues of either the environment and natural resources or the politics of varied forms of cultural representation and interpretation.

1. WMS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies (MPF) (3); and
2. WMS/ POL 346 Global Gender Politics (3); or
    WMS/ HST 450 Topics in Women's History (3); and
3. WMS/ REL 333 Religion, Dress, and Status (3); or
    WMS/ GEO 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment (3)
Note: Not open to women's studies majors.

ZOO 1  Concepts in Physiology. Provides an understanding of cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in physiological systems. Begins with a Foundation course then provides more depth to cellular and molecular mechanisms of action in physiological processes.

1. BOT/MBI/ ZOO 116 Biological Concepts (MPF) (4), or
     ZOO 114 Principles of Biology (MPF) (4); and
2. ZOO 202 Patterns in Development (4), or
     ZOO 203 Introduction to Cell Biology (3); and
3. ZOO 305 Animal Physiology (4)
Note: Not open to majors in the Department of Zoology.

ZOO 2 Animal Diversity. Illustrates the diversity of organisms within the Kingdom Animalia. This diversity includes variation in body structure and function, life history traits, and ecological roles. Upon completion, students will be able to describe major patterns in variation among animal taxa, understand mechanisms that lead to creation of such variation, and provide detailed examples of animal diversity.

1. ZOO 113 Animal Diversity (MPF) (4); or
    BOT/MBI/ ZOO 115 Biological Concepts (MPF) (4); and
2. ZOO 204 Fundamentals of Ecology (3); or
     ZOO 206 Evolutionary Biology (3); and
3. ZOO 311 Vertebrate Zoology (4); or
     ZOO 312 Invertebrate Zoology (4).
Note: Not open to zoology majors.

Thematic Sequences Available at Dolibois European Center, Luxembourg

For information contact the Oxford campus coordinator, 220 MacMillan Hall (513-529-5050).

LUX 1 The Development of Contemporary Europe — Social Science Emphasis As one of the centers of the European Union, Luxembourg is an ideal place to study Europe from a social science perspective. Permits you to gain a clear perspective on the cultural, political, and sociological phenomena in the post World War I period. Take the core lecture course plus two courses from the companion list for a total of nine credit hours. Students whose major is in the same department as the core may only count the core lecture course for this unit.

LUX  2 The European Cultural Heritage. (Humanities) As a microcosm of contemporary European culture and one of the capitals of the European Union, Luxembourg provides a setting for you to investigate these interrelationships from the perspective of the humanities, taking advantage of the proximity of the Grand Duchy to the great centers of European culture. Take the core lecture course plus two courses from the companion list for a total of nine credit hours. Students whose major is in the same department as the core may only count the core lecture course for this unit.

LUX  3 European Culture and Society. (Interdisciplinary) Permits you to draw on the variety of European focused courses available at the Dolibois European Center to develop an in-depth understanding of the complexities of contemporary Europe. Emphasis is on an interdisciplinary perspective which links cultural phenomena and socio-political dynamics. You must take at least one course from each of the three groupings: language, social sciences, and humanities.

LUX 4 The Development of Contemporary Europe — Business Emphasis. As one of the centers of the European Union, Luxembourg is an ideal place to study Europe from a business perspective. This location permits you to gain a clear perspective on the cultural, political, and sociological phenomena in the post World War I period. Take the core lecture course plus two courses from the companion list for a total of nine credit hours. Students whose major is in the same department as the core may only count the core lecture course for this unit.

Capstone Experience (3 hours minimum)

The Capstone Experience, completed near the end of baccalaureate studies, integrates liberal learning with specialized knowledge. Each Capstone emphasizes sharing of ideas, synthesis, and critical, informed reflection as significant precursors to action, and each includes student initiative in defining and investigating problems or projects.

Capstones may be completed in or outside your major; in some departments, the Capstone Experience may be a requirement of the major. All Capstones presume a significant scholarly background of specialized study in a major as well as in liberal education course work. In other words, a Capstone does more than culminate four years of baccalaureate study: it culminates your Miami undergraduate education.

Ordinarily, a Capstone Experience is taken at Miami and completed in the senior year (minimum of 96 hours registered or earned). Students who plan to transfer any course to meet the Capstone requirement must obtain permission from the Office of Liberal Education before they take the course.

The Office of Liberal Education website (www.muohio.edu/led) provides a complete listing of Capstone Experiences. Please refer to the Courses of Instruction chapter for course descriptions of the Capstones.

Students may propose their own Senior Capstone Experience. See the Office of Liberal Education website (www.muohio.edu/led) for details.

Endowed Capstones

Generous contributions from alumni and friends of the university have led to the creation of several endowed Capstone courses. These specially designated Capstones provide funding for activities and opportunities not usually available in most Capstones. Students in endowed Capstones might meet and exchange ideas with distinguished scholars or specialists not affiliated with the university, might travel to sites studied by the Capstone, or might engage in any number of activities that, without external support, could not be offered to students.

Endowed Capstones include the following:
The Mina Burckhardt Capstone in Women’s Studies
The Elizabeth Burckhardt Capstone in Psychology
The Nevin Clark Family Fund Capstone in English Literature
The Walter Halbedel Capstone in Zoology
The Ernst G. Siefert Capstone in Political Science

Capstone Experience Courses

AES 432 National Security Forces in Contemporary American Society (3)
AMS 401 Senior Capstone in American Studies (4)
ARC 402C Senior Studio Capstone Experience (6)
ARC 405U/ GEO 493 Urban Field Experience (3)
ARC 408 Senior Interior Design Studio Capstone Experience (6)
ART 419 Supervised Teaching in Art (16)
ARC 426 Architecture and Society (3)
ART 452 Senior Degree Project (3)
ART 453 Advertising Practice (Laws, Hall & Associates) (4, maximum 8)
ART 492 Professional Artist’s Portfolio and Exhibition Experience (3)
ART 497 Museums as Interpreters of Culture (3)
ART 498 Seminar in the History and Methods of Art and Architectural History (3)
ATH 421 Senior Seminar in Anthropology (3)
ATH 426 Ethnographic Field Research (4-16)
ATH/ ZOO 498 Evolution of Human Behavior (3)
BLS 465 Ethics, Law, and Business (3)
BOT/ ZOO 467 Conservation Biology (3)
BOT 490A Current Advances and Issues in Botany (1) with concurrent enrollment in BOT 477 (2)
BOT 490B Research/Internship Capstone in Botany (1) with concurrent enrollment in BOT 400 (2) or BOT 477 (2) for research option; or concurrent enrollment in BOT 340 (2) for internship option
BOT 490C Departmental Honors Capstone in Botany (1) plus concurrent enrollment in BOT 480 (2)
BOT490D Undergraduate Botany Teaching (1) plus concurrent enrollment in BOT 477 (2)
BOT 3-2 Program in Forestry/Environmental Management
BOT/GLG/ ZOO 494 Sustainability Perspectives in Resources and Business (3)
BOT/ GEO 496 Biodiversity of Kenya (5)
BOT 499A Tropical Flora of the Bahamas (3)
BUS 461 Small/Emerging Enterprise Consulting (3)
BWS/FST/ LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution (4)
BWS/ WMS 370E Feminism and the Diaspora: Women of Color in the U.S. (3)
CHM 491 Chemistry in Societal Issues (3)
CHM 492 Independent Research Capstone in Chemistry (3)
CLS 401 The Age of Pericles (3)
CLS 402 The Age of Augustus (3)
COM/ MIS 412 Communicating Through Multimedia (3)
COM 414 Senior Project in Communication (4)
COM 415 Practicum in Television Journalism (3)
COM 437 Advocacy in Contemporary America (3)
COM 439 Advanced Organizational Communication (3)
COM 440 Practicum: Mass Media Advertising and Public Relations (Laws, Hall & Associates) (4)
COM 445 Seminar in Mass Communication Law (3)
COM 459 Advanced Public Relations (3)
CSA 475 Software Systems Project (3)
ECO 405 Managerial Economics (3)
ECO 408 Productivity and Growth (3)
ECO 427 The Great Depression Revisited (3)
EDL 401 Cultural Studies and the Complexity of Empowerment (3)
EDP 460 Action Research/Problem-based Seminar in Exceptional Education/Developmental Differences (3)
EDP 497 Literacy Training Seminar (3)
EDT 422 Studies in Educational Issues (3)
EDT 499B Developing Cross-Cultural Contexts for Teaching and Learning (3)
EDT 499C Comparing Selected U.S. and European Schools (3)
EDT 499J The Inca Empire (3) Engineering 3-2 Program
ENG 405 Advanced Linguistics (3)
ENG 406 Discourse Analysis: Speech Acts in Context (3)
ENG 415 Practicum in Technical and Scientific Communication (3)
ENG 460 Issues in Creative Writing (3)
ENG/WMS 495 Capstone in Literature (3)
ENG 496 English Studies: Reflections on Literature and Language (3)
ENT 497, 498 Senior Design Project (2, 2)
ESP 467 Entrepreneurship: New Ventures (3)
FIN 485 Integrative Concepts in Finance (3)
FRE 410 Senior Seminar (3)
FSW 498 Critical Thinking About Family Relationships (4)
GEO 491 Senior Seminar (4)
GEO 492 Geography of the Auto Industry (3)
GER 471 Linguistic Perspectives on Contemporary German (3)
GLG 411 Field Geology (6)
GTY 468 The Aging Individual in a Changing Society (3)
HST 400 Senior Capstone in History (3-6)
IMS 440 Interactive Media Studies Practicum (4)
ITS 402 Senior Capstone in International Studies (3)
LAS 410 Current Latin American Issues (3)
LAS/ POL 478 Media and Politics in Latin America and the Caribbean (3)
MBI 440C Research Problems (2) and MBI 490C Undergraduate Seminar (1)
MBI 477C Independent Study (2) and MBI 490C Undergraduate Seminar (1)
MBI 480C Departmental Honors (2) and MBI 490C Undergraduate Seminar (1)
MBI 487, 489 Clinical Laboratory Science Practicum (8, 15, 15)
MGT 495 Strategic Management (3)
MIS 495 Seminar in Management Information Systems (3)
MKT 442 Integrated Marketing Communications Practice (Laws, Hall & Associates) (4)
MKT 491 Marketing Strategy (3)
MKT 495 Marketing Strategy Practicum (4)
MME 448, 449 Senior Design Project (2, 1-2)
MTH 407 Mathematical Structures Through Inquiry
MTH 425 Number Theory (3)
MTH 435 Mathematical Modeling Seminar
MTH 482 Great Theorems of Mathematics (3)
MUS 453 Comparisons in the Arts (3)
MUS 475 Senior Practicum in Music Education (3)
MUS 493 Capstone Senior Recital (3)
NSC 416 Leadership Seminar (1) and NSC 410 Leadership Laboratory (1, 1)
NSG 435 Challenges in Health Care Delivery (3)
PHL 404 What is Philosophy? (3)
PHL 405 Philosophy for Children (4)
PHS 402 Critical Reflections on Health Care (3)
PHS 499M International Health: Global Perspectives (4)
PHS 499N A European Perspective: Health, Social, Economic and Political Impacts of Health Promotion (4)
PHY 488A and 488B Research Capstone in Physics (3)
PHY 490S Topics in Physics Seminar (3)
POL 419 Civil Society and Modern Politics (3)
POL 424 Transatlantic Seminar on the European Union (4)
POL 439 North American Politics: Unity and Diversity (3)
POL 459 Capstone Seminar on the American Political System (3)
POL 466 Public Policy Analysis (3)
POL 471 The International System (3)
POL 487 Individual Lives and International Politics (3)
POL 489 Conflict Management in a Divided World (3)
PSE 411 Advanced Paper Manufacturing (3)
PSE 471, 472 Senior Design I, II (1, 2)
PSY 410 Capstone Seminar in Psychology: Multiple Determinants of Behavior (3)
PSY 490 Research Apprenticeship in Psychology (3)
REL 402 Basic Structures in the History of Religions (4)
RUS 401 St. Petersburg: History, Literature, Culture (3)
SOC 459 Sociology Capstone (3)
SOC 462 Applied Sociological Research (3)
SPA 413 Senior Seminar in Communication Disorders (3)
SPA 499B Intercultural Workshop in Speech Pathology and Audiology (3)
SPN 490 Issues in Hispanic Literature (3)
STA 475 Data Analysis Practicum (3)
THE 490 The Theatre and a Cultural Aesthetic (3)
THE 499K Field Studies in the Czech Republic (8)
WCP 444, 445 Senior Workshop and Project (5, 5)
WMS 401 The Role of Women in a Transforming Society (3)
ZOO 400 Capstone Seminar: Contemporary Issues (3)
ZOO 419R Independent Research in Zoology (3)
ZOO 431 Winter Biology (3)
ZOO 444 Molecular Biology (3)
ZOO 452 Nerve and Muscle Physiology (4)
ZOO 453 Animal Physiological Ecology (4)
ZOO 454 Endocrinology (3)
ZOO 459 Neurophysiology (4)
ZOO 462 Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment (4)
ZOO 465 Animal Behavior (4)
ZOO/ BOT 467 Conservation Biology (3)

Beyond your liberal education courses, you must complete work for your major and divisional requirements, and complete additional hours for minors or electives.

Frequency of Course Offerings

Scheduling information is provided for some courses in the Courses of Instruction chapter in this Bulletin. Scheduling patterns are subject to change without notice based, usually, on student demand, faculty availability, and programmatic priorities.


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