Academic Organization & Programs

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Academic Divisions

List of Academic Divisions

Miami University has seven academic divisions:

  1. College of Arts and Science
  2. Farmer School of Business
  3. College of Creative Arts
  4. College of Education, Health, and Society
  5. College of Engineering and Computing
  6. College of Professional Studies and Applied Sciences
  7. Graduate School.

It also has the Miami University Dolibois European Center (MUDEC), which is located in Luxembourg.

Consolidation, Partition, Transfer or Elimination of Academic Divisions

Resolution 08-09 of University Senate, “Guide for the Consolidation, Partition, Transfer, or Elimination of Academic Divisions, Departments, or Programs” articulates the process and guidelines for altering or eliminating an academic division.  That resolution notes that:

“ordinary administrative chains of command should always be observed in the decision-making and implementation process; that is, discussion, consultation, and fact-finding will normally begin at the programmatic, departmental and dean level, with recommendations passing through divisional channels before reaching the Provost’s office. This does not preclude initiative for such a decision-making process coming from a higher or lower level, but it is meant to establish the principle of involving first, and in a substantial way, those who are closest to the areas under consideration.”

It also outlines a process which should be followed which is led by a process coordinator “designated by the Provost in consultation with the Executive Committee of University Senate at the point when a program, department, or division administrator initiates formal discussion involving consolidation, partition, transfer, or elimination. Although not necessarily a member of Senate, the process coordinator will regularly report to Senate on the progress of discussions and will, wherever needed, facilitate the communication process among affected parties.”  Every effort should be made “to keep the Provost, other appropriate University officers, and the faculty, staff, and students in affected divisions, departments, and programs informed of the progress of such discussions as they take place.”

The following actions and timetables should guide all administrators and key stakeholders whenever consolidation, partition, transfer, or elimination is being formally considered. Relevant communication should occur at a time that would allow for substantive feedback from affected parties.

Step 1: Name a process coordinator and appoint an ad hoc working group or appropriate committee.

Step 2: State action being considered and broad rationale for the proposed action, and identify those who would be affected. [15 days]

Step 3: Gather information, consider courses of action, and communicate results of assessment and impact analysis. [90 days; if Academic Program Review is necessary, adequate time will be added to the process to complete the program review.]

  • Identify sources and types of information and provide this information to those affected.
  • Consult with the faculty, staff, and students in affected divisions, departments, and programs.
  • Consult the Council of Academic Deans and the affected administrators.
  • Initiate Academic Program Review when elimination of a division, department(s) and/or program(s) is among the tentative goals and when an Academic Program Review has not been conducted within the last three years.
  • Assess impact on and consequences for:
    • Miami’s mission and primary goals;
    • students, faculty, and staff;
    • divisions, departments, or programs that will be directly or indirectly affected;
    • budgetary issues.
  • Communicate results of assessment and impact analysis.

Step 4: Seek response from individuals directly or indirectly affected, including interested external parties. [60 days]

Step 5: Make recommendation to University Senate for consideration.

Step 6: Make recommendation to Provost. [15 days]

Academic Departments, Programs, and Centers

College of Arts and Science

Air Force and Naval ROTC

Anthropology (ATH)

Biology (BIO)

Chemistry & Biochemistry (CHM)

Classics (CLS)

Comparative Religion (REL)

Economics (ECO)

English (ENG)

French & Italian (FRE and ITL)

Geography (GEO)

Geology (GLG)

German, Russian & East Asian Languages (GER)

History (HST)

Mathematics (MTH)

Media, Journalism, and Film (MJF)

Microbiology (MBI)

Philosophy (PHL)

Physics (PHY)

Political Science (POL)

Psychology (PSY)

Sociology & Gerontology (SOC and GTY)

Spanish & Portuguese (SPN)

Speech Pathology & Audiology (SPA)

Statistics (STA)

Interdisciplinary Programs

  • American Culture and English (ACE)
  • American Studies (AMS)
  • Asian/Asian-American Studies (AAS)
  • Black World Studies (BWS)
  • Individualized Studies (Western Program) (WST)
  • International Studies (ITS)
  • Latin American, Latino/a & Caribbean Studies (LAS)
  • University Studies
  • Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies (WGS)

 

Centers and Institutes:

  • Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies
  • Center for American & World Cultures
  • Center for Animal Behavior
  • Center for Aquatic & Watershed Sciences
  • Center for Bioinformatics and Functional Genomics
  • Center for Advanced Microscopy and Imaging
  • Center for Environmental Education
  • Center for Neuroscience & Behavior
  • Center for Public Management and Regional Affairs
  • Center for Chemistry Education
  • Ecology Research Center
  • Institute for the Environment and Sustainability
  • Scripps Gerontology Center
  • Havighurst Center for Russian and Post-Soviet Studies
  • Mallory-Wilson Center for Healthcare Education
  • Interactive Language Resource Center
  • Statistical Consulting Center
  • Summer Undergraduate Mathematical Sciences Research Institute

Farmer School of Business

Accountancy (ACC)

Economics  (ECO)

Finance (FIN)

Information Systems & Analytics (ISA)

Management (MGT)

Marketing (MKT)

Centers & Institutes:

  • Institute for Entrepreneurship
  • Center for Social Entrepreneurship
  • Center for Business Excellence

 

College of Creative Arts

Architecture & Interior Design (ARC)

Art (ART)

Music (MUS)

Theatre (THE)

Centers & Institutes:

  • Art Museum

 

College of Education, Health, and Society

Educational Leadership (EDL)

Educational Psychology (EDP)

Family Studies and Social Work (FSW)

Kinesiology and Health (KNH)

Teacher Education (EDT)

Centers:

  • Discovery Center
  • Ohio’s Evaluation and Assessment Center for Mathematics and Science Education
  • Heckert Center for Children’s Reading and Writing
  • Center for Human Development, Learning, and Technology
  • Center for Education and Cultural Studies
  • Center for Health Enhancement
  • Questionnaire & Test Design-Analysis Laboratory

 

College of Engineering & Computing

Chemical, Paper, and Biomedical Engineering

Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Computer Science and Software Engineering

 

College of Professional Studies and Applied Sciences

Bachelor of Integrative Studies (BIS)

Business Technology (BTE)

Computer and Information Technology (CIT)

Criminal Justice (CJS)

Engineering Technology (ENT)

Nursing (NSG)

 

Graduate School

Establishment of an Academic Department or Program

According to Article II, Section 5 of the “Regulations of the Board of Trustees,” “An academic department is an administrative unit established to combine the various offerings of a particular academic discipline or area of knowledge.  The number and designation of such departments shall be determined by the President, subject to approval by the Board.”

Academic Unit Name Change

Requests for name changes to academic departments (programs, if appropriate) and/or divisions, after consultation with the relevant parties, are reported on the University Senate consent calendar and require the approval of the following bodies: department chair (program director, if appropriate), academic dean of the division, Provost, and the Board of Trustees. For more information, please see MUPIM 2.9.B.

Once the name change has been approved by all of the necessary Miami bodies or persons, a change request must also be submitted to the Ohio Board of Regents.

 

Consolidation, Partition, Transfer, or Elimination of Academic Departments and Programs

The guidelines for the consolidation, partition, transfer, or elimination of academic divisions (described above) also apply to academic departments and programs.

Academic Degree Programs

Definition of an Academic Degree

According to the Ohio Board of Regents, an academic degree is defined as “any recognition or award for completion of a prescribed course of study in an institution of higher education designated by the customary titles of associate, bachelor, master, specialist or doctor. “

Miami University offers associate, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees.

Associate’s DegreeAn award that requires completion of at least 64 semester credit hours with a certain number coming from Miami University.   Sixteen credit hours must come from the Miami regional division for all associate’s degrees, except for the Associate in Arts which requires 32 of the 64 hours from any Miami division.  All associate degrees must have student learning outcomes and an ongoing plan for assessing them.

  • Associate in Arts and Associate of Science degrees are designed for students wishing to complete the first two years of a bachelor’s degree, as well as those desiring two years of a liberal arts education.
  • Associate of Applied Business and Associate of Applied Science degrees are awarded in recognition of successful completion of career technical education programs and prepare student for immediate employment upon graduation. The curricula for applied associate’s degree programs are described in terms of technical and non-technical studies.  Non-technical studies include general education and courses that serve as a base for the technical field (sometimes referred to as “applied general education” or “basic” coursework).  Non-technical studies should make up approximately 50% of the curriculum.
  • Associate of Technical Study degrees are awarded for successful completion of an individually planned program of study designed to respond to the need for specialized technical education not currently available in the formal degree programs available on a particular campus.  The program must have an area of concentration which is equivalent to at least 30 semester credit hours in technical studies and a clearly identifiable career objective. 

Bachelor’s Degree:  An award that requires completion of at least 128 semester credit hours; bachelor’s degree programs do not normally exceed 146 semester credit hours unless the additional coursework is required to meet professional accreditation or licensing requirements. The degree includes fulfillment of liberal education, divisional and major requirements. At least 32 of the credit hours must be from Miami University, including 12 of the final 20 hours required for the bachelor’s degree.  If students are enrolled in an arts-professional arrangement program, in which they transfer to another university after three years, you must earn 96 Miami credit hours in the college of Arts and Science of Miami University.  Bachelor’s degrees may be awarded for general areas of study, such as those recognized by the Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science degrees or in specialized professional and technical fields such as these recognized by the Bachelor of Fine Arts. Although bachelor’s degrees require completion of a specified number of credit hours, the length of the program can vary.  All bachelor’s degrees must have student learning outcomes and an ongoing plan for assessing them.

Master’s DegreeAn award that requires the successful completion at least 30 semester credit hours.  Master’s degrees such as the Master of Arts and the Master of Science are typically considered research graduate degrees, and involve six to 12 credit hours of research to discover new knowledge.  Some departments offer a thesis-type master’s program, while others offer a course-type program.  Master’s degrees may also recognize preparation for professional practice.  Examples of professional practice master’s degrees include the Master of Business Administration (MB A) and the Master of Social Work (MSW). All master’s degrees must have student learning outcomes and an ongoing plan for assessing them.

Doctoral DegreeThe highest award a student can earn for graduate study.  The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) is typically considered a research degree and involves preparation for the conduct of independent research and the discovery of new knowledge.  Doctoral degrees may also recognize preparation for professional practice.  Examples of professional practice doctoral degrees include the Doctor of Education (Ed.D.).  Miami University offers the Doctor of Philosophy in the Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Education, Educational Leadership, English, Geology & Environmental Earth Science, Gerontology, History, Microbiology, and Psychology.  The Doctor of Education is awarded in the Department of Educational Leadership.  Each doctoral degree program has different requirements. 

Guidelines for Submission of Degree Program Proposals

The internal institutional process for proposing any curriculum leading to a new undergraduate or graduate degree, including name changes to the same, begins with approval by the department or program, after consultation with other departments or programs (where appropriate).

Please note: New degrees must be approved by Miami University as well as by the Ohio Board of Regents. To expedite the process, departments and programs are encouraged to work with the Office of the Provost to submit a Letter of Intent to the Ohio Board of Regents early in the internal institutional approval process.  The link to the Letter of Intent template can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents website.  For more information on the Ohio Board of Regents process of approval, see the “Ohio Board of Regents Guidelines for Approval of Degree Programs” in this manual.

Proposal forms for new degree programs can be found on the Office of the Registrar website.

The proposal must be submitted for approval by the following bodies:

Approving Body or Person

Undergraduate

Graduate

Department or Program

*

*

Division

*

*

Council for Undergraduate Curriculum

*

 

Graduate Council

 

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

*

University Senate

*

*

President

*

*

Board of Trustees

*

*

Ohio Board of Regents

*

*

Higher Learning Commission Notification

*

*

*Note: Upon approval by the Board of Trustees, the Office of the University Secretary, in consultation with the academic division and department or program, shall submit proposals for new undergraduate degrees to the Ohio Board of Regents (OBOR) and Higher Learning Commission. The Graduate School reports proposals for new graduate degrees to the Regents Advisory Committee on Graduate Study (RACGS) and Higher Learning Commission.

For more information, see: MUPIM 11.1.E.

Combined Degree Programs

The combined bachelor’s-master’s program allows highly qualified students to simultaneously pursue both a bachelor’s and master’s degree.  Currently, Miami offers multiple master’s programs that can be completed in the combined format:

Admission Requirements: Students can declare their interest in the combined program anytime during their academic career at Miami, from the time they apply for undergraduate admission.  Upon earning a minimum of 64 hours and having a GPA of 3.25 or greater, students may apply to a combined program by completing the Graduate School application and submitting materials as required by the program to which they are applying.   Standard application and admission procedures shall be used.  Both full- and part-time students may participate in the combined program at a department’s discretion.  Regular time-limits for completing the master’s degree apply to students in a combined program.

 

Double Counting Graduate Hours: Departments or programs with a combined degree may allow students to double-count up to 12 hours of graduate course work toward their undergraduate degree.  With permission of the appropriate advisor(s) and dean(s) or their designee(s), these students may count the graduate courses toward their major, minor, electives, and university requirements.  A minimum of 150 hours is required for the combined program, of which 30 must be graduate course work.

 

Student Classification and Graduation:  Students in a combined program will remain undergraduates until they apply for graduation or submit a request to the Graduate School to have their classification changed from undergraduate to graduate.  Students must have completed a minimum of 128 hours to be classified as a graduate student.  Students may receive their bachelor’s degree prior to completing their master’s degree.  Upon receiving the bachelor’s degree, students will automatically be classified as graduate students.  Students receiving the bachelor’s degree prior to completing the master’s degree can count up to 12 hours of graduate course work toward their bachelor’s degree.  Those hours can also count toward the completion of their master’s degree as indicated above.

 

Students may withdraw from the combined program by completing a withdrawal form at the Graduate School.  The student must note on the withdrawal form that he/she is withdrawing only from the combined program and wishes to retain their status in the undergraduate program.  The student must also notify their department of their decision to withdraw from the combined program.

 

Guidelines for Proposing a Combined Program

Departments or programs with a combined degree may allow students to double-count up to 9 hours of graduate course work toward their undergraduate degree.  With permission of the appropriate advisor(s) and dean(s) or their designee(s), these students may count the graduate courses toward their major, minor, electives, and university requirements.  A minimum of 150 hours is required for the combined program; 120 semester hour minimum for a bachelor's degree and 30 hour minimum for a master's degree.

Each of the two degrees must undergo the approval process for any new degree program.  Once approved, the chair or director of the combined program should contact the Graduate School so that it is listed among the options of combined degree programs at Miami.  The department(s) or program(s) hosting the combined degree is also encouraged to market it on their departmental websites.

Ohio Board of Regents Guidelines for Approval of Degree Programs

Undergraduate Degrees

Both Miami University as well as the Ohio Board of Regents must approve all new academic degrees. Below are the steps needed for approval of a new undergraduate degree by the Ohio Board of Regents:

  1. 1.      Letter of Intent:  The Provost submits a Letter of Intent at least six months prior to the planned implementation of the new degreeThe Letter of Intent may be submitted prior to the completion of internal institutional approval processes and will be shared with individuals charged with oversight of the Ohio Board of Regents Course and Program Sharing Network.  
  • The link to the Letter of Intent template can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents website.
  • If the new degree contains a program that leads to an education license or endorsement, the Letter of Intent must indicate the specific license or endorsement that the institution intends to offer.  Each license and endorsement will require a review and may require a site visit.
  1. 2.      Posting of Request: Once the Letter of Intent is received, the institution and name of proposed degree is posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ website: http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php.
  2. 3.      Proposal:  After the new degree has received all of the required internal approvals, the institution’s president or chief academic officer submits a Proposal at least three months prior to the planned implementation of the new degree.  The Proposal provides information to demonstrate that the program meets the General Standards for Academic Programs.
  • The link to the Proposal template can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents website.
  • If the new degree contains a program that leads to education licensure or endorsement, the educator preparation program review will proceed concurrently.
  • A Proposal must be submitted within one year of submission of the Letter of Intent or a new Letter of Intent is required. 
  1. 4.      Staff Review of Proposal: Chancellor’s staff members review the proposal for completeness prior to presentation for expert comment from peer institutions.
5.      Peer Review of Proposal:
  • The proposal is circulated to a listserv of campus contacts to solicit comments from experts within the discipline
  • The peer review focuses on the qualifications, experience and sufficiency of faculty, the curriculum and its alignment with expectations for the discipline, the need for the degree and the resources (e.g., classrooms, libraries, technology, laboratory, equipment) available to support the degree.
  • Peer institutions and the Chancellor’s staff will have 30 days to submit comments to the listserv.
  1. 6.      Institutional Response Document:  Proposing institutions will have an opportunity to provide a written response to the peer comments.  This response document will be submitted to the Chancellor’s staff at least two months prior to the planned implementation of the new degree.
  2. 7.      Resolution of Concerns:  The Chancellor’s staff members work with the institution proposing the program to address questions or concerns raised during the peer comment period.
  3. 8.      Public Comment Period:  If the program is recommended to the Chancellor for approval, a background summary will be posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ web site (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php) for a ten-day public comment period.
  4. 9.      Chancellor’s Approval:  The request and public comments are forwarded to the Chancellor for final approval. 

Graduate Degrees

The Ohio Board of Regents’ Advisory Committee on Graduate Studies (RACGS) oversees the peer review of new graduate degree requests.  The members of RACGS are the graduate deans (or designees) of each of Ohio’s public research institutions and the University of Dayton and Case Western Reserve University.

  1. 1.      Program Development Plan (PDP): The institution’s RACGS representative submits a PDP at least 12 months prior to the planned implementation of the new degreeThe PDP may be submitted prior to the completion of internal institutional approval processes
  • The format for the PDP is in the RACGS Guidelines and Procedures for Review and Approval of Graduate Degree Programs; a link to this document can be found in Appendix I.
  • The PDP is submitted electronically to the RACGS listserv (racgs@regents.state.oh.us) for circulation among the RACGS members and the Chancellor’s staff.
  • If the new degree contains a program that leads to an education license or endorsement, the PDP must indicate the specific license or endorsement that the institution intends to offer.  Each area will require the submission of an education supplement to the internal Board of Regents team responsible for the approval of educator preparation licenses and endorsements and may require a site visit.  The RACGS administrator will facilitate coordination of the review of the degree by RACGS and the educator preparation review of the license or endorsement component.
  • In cases where graduate degrees are preparing P-12 educators for work in schools, additional forms may need to be completed even if the program does not lead to an education license or endorsement.  The RACGS administrator will coordinate the review by RACGS and the review of the P-12 education component.
  1. 2.      Posting of Request:  Once the PDP is received, the institution and name of proposed degree is posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ website: (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php). 
  2. 3.      Peer Review:  The graduate deans share the PDP with experts within the discipline at their institutions, who then provide suggestions for improvements (graduate deans have six weeks to submit comments to the RACGS listserv). The Chancellor’s staff members may also choose to provide comments on the PDP.  Based on the RACGS reviews, the review of the education license and endorsement components (when applicable) and its own assessment, the proposing institution will decide whether the PDP should be expanded to a Full Proposal and be submitted for RACGS review.
  3. 4.      Full Proposal:  After the new degree has received all of the required internal approvals, the institution’s RACGS representative submits the Full Proposal electronically to the RACGS listserv and requests responses from disciplinary experts and the Chancellor’s staff within 6 weeks.
  • The format for the Full Proposal is in the RACGS manual.
  • If the new degree contains a program that leads to an education license or endorsement, the full proposal will be forwarded to the internal Board of Regents team responsible for the approval of educator preparation licenses and endorsements.  The RACGS administrator will facilitate coordination of the review of the full proposal by RACGS and the license or endorsement component.
  • The Full Proposal is submitted electronically to the RACGS listserv (racgs@regents.state.oh.us) for circulation among the RACGS members and Chancellor’s staff.
  • A Full Proposal must be submitted within 2 years or a new PDP is required. 
  1. 5.      Peer and Chancellor’s Staff Review of the Full Proposal:  The graduate deans share the Full Proposal with experts within the discipline at their institutions, who then provide their written comments to the graduate dean via the listserv within 6 weeks. The Chancellor’s staff members may also choose to provide comments on the full proposal.
  2. 6.      Response Document and RACGS Presentation:
  • Based on the comments received on the Full Proposal (including any comments made regarding the educator preparation portion of the program), the proposing institution prepares a Response Document.  The format for the Response Document is in the RACGS manual; a link to that manual can be found in Appendix I. 
  • The chair of RACGS schedules a formal presentation of the proposal at an upcoming RACGS meeting. 
  • The institution posts the Response Document to the RACGS listserv at least 10 days prior to the formal presentation.
  • Faculty members from the proposing institution present the proposal to RACGS members and Chancellor’s staff. 
  1. 7.      RACGS Recommendation:  Following the presentation, each RACGS member votes either to recommend or not recommend the new degree to the Chancellor.  A two-thirds affirmative vote of those present (with a minimum of eight affirmative votes) is required for a positive recommendation. 
  2. 8.      Public Comment Period:  If the program is recommended to the Chancellor for approval, a background summary will be posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ web site (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php) for a 10-day public comment period.
  3. 9.      Chancellor’s Approval: The request and public comments are forwarded to the Chancellor for final consideration and approval. 

Specialized Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees

New Specialized Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees for Which Specialized Accreditation is Available

An institution seeking authorization to expand either specialized undergraduate technical and professional education programs (e.g., the associate of applied business in accounting, associate of applied science in respiratory therapy, bachelor of music, bachelor of science in nursing, bachelor of fine arts) or to expand graduate degrees in specialized fields of study (e.g., master of business administration, master of social work, master of fine arts, doctor of education or the doctor of business administration) beyond those listed on its current Certificate of Authorization may obtain an amended Certificate of Authorization using the steps outlined below.

  1. 1.      Letter of Intent: The institution’s president or chief academic officer notifies the Chancellor of the institution’s intent to seek accreditation of the new program from a professional accreditor recognized by the US Department of Education by submitting a Letter of Intent and the required fees prior to the initiation of the accreditation process.
  • The Letter of Intent will include a section attesting that the new degree meets all standards outlined in the Requirements of Academic Programs section of the Ohio Board of Regents Program Approval Manual.
  • If the new degree contains a program that leads to education licensure or endorsement, the Letter of Intent must indicate the areas of licensure or endorsement that the institution intends to offer, as additional reviews may need to be coordinated.
  1. 2.      Posting of Request:  Once the Letter of Intent and fees are received, the institution and name of proposed degree is posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ website:  (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php). 
  2. 3.      Degree Approval Materials:  The Chancellor’s staff will accept materials prepared for the professional accreditor in lieu of the standard Board of Regents proposal. The institution will coordinate with the Chancellor’s staff members to ensure that the office receives all materials received by professional accreditor.
  3. 4.      Documentation of Accreditor’s Approval:  The institution is responsible for submitting evidence, including team reports, institutional responses and final determinations, demonstrating that the new degree has been approved by the accreditor.
  4. 5.      Public Comment Period:  Once approval has been received from the accreditor, a background summary will be posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ web site (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php) for a 10-day public comment period.
  5. 6.      Chancellor’s Approval:  The request and public comments are forwarded to the Chancellor for final consideration and approval. 
  6. 7.      Certificate of Authorization Issued:  A new or a revised Certificate of Authorization is issued to the institution.  If the institution is incorporated, the institution shall file a copy of the certificate of authorization with the secretary of state as required by section 1713.02 of the Revised Code.
  7. 8.      Progress Reports:  If progress or follow-up reports are required as part of the accreditation process, the institution is responsible for sending all such communication to the Chancellor’s representative.
New Specialized Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees for which Professional Accreditation is Available Only After a Period of Program Operation

If a specialized accreditor will not accredit a program until a period of operation has passed and if prior approval for offering the program is not[1] required by Higher Learning Commission, the institution may offer the program while specialized accreditation is pending using the steps outlined below. 

 

  1. 1.      Letter of Intent:  The institution’s president or chief academic officer notifies the Chancellor of the institution’s intent to seek accreditation of the new program from a professional accreditor recognized by the US Department of Education by submitting a Letter of Intent and the required fees prior to the initiation of the accreditation process.
  • The Letter of Intent will include a section attesting that the new degree meets all standards outlined in the Requirements of Academic Programs section of the Ohio Board of Regents Program Approval Manual.
  • The Letter of Intent will provide an estimate of the date that professional accreditation will be sought.
  • If the new degree contains a program that leads to education licensure or endorsement, the Letter of Intent must indicate the areas of licensure or endorsement that the institution intends to offer, as additional reviews may need to be coordinated.
  1. Posting of Request:  Once the Letter of Intent and fees are received, the institution and name of proposed degree is posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ website:  (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php). 
  2. Degree Approval Materials:  Once the program has reached the time when professional accreditation can be sought, the Chancellor’s staff will accept materials prepared for the professional accreditor in lieu of the standard Board of Regents proposal. The institution will coordinate with the Chancellor’s staff members to ensure that the office receives all materials received by professional accreditor.
  3. Documentation of Accreditor’s Approval:  The institution is responsible for submitting evidence, including team reports, institutional responses and final determinations, demonstrating that the new degree has been approved by the accreditor.  The Chancellor must be informed immediately if the institution decides not to seek professional accreditation or if accreditation is denied so that the standard review process can be initiated.
  4. Public Comment Period:  Once approval has been received from the accreditor, a background summary will be posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ web site (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php) for a ten-day public comment period.
  5. Chancellor’s Approval:  The request and public comments are forwarded to the Chancellor for final consideration and approval. 
  6. Certificate of Authorization Issued:  A new or a revised Certificate of Authorization is issued to the institution.  If the institution is incorporated, the institution shall file a copy of the certificate of authorization with the secretary of state as required by section 1713.02 of the Revised Code.
  7. Progress Reports:  If progress or follow-up reports are required as part of the accreditation process, the institution is responsible for sending all such communication to the Chancellor’s representative.
New Specialized Undergraduate and Graduate Degrees for which Professional Accreditation is Not Available

If the specialized degree does not have a specialized accreditor and if prior approval for offering the program is not[2] required by Higher Learning Commission, the institution may obtain an amended Certificate of Authorization using the steps outlined below:

  1. Letter of Intent: The institution’s president or chief academic officer notifies the Chancellor of the institution’s intent to offer a new degree program for which professional accreditation is not available.  See Ohio Board of Regents’ website for more information about submitting a Letter of Intent.
  • The Letter of Intent will attest that a specialized accreditor does not exist for the degree.
  • The Letter of Intent will include a section attesting that the new degree meets all standards outlined in the Requirements of Academic Programs section of the Ohio Board of Regents Program Approval Manual.
  • The Letter of Intent will include a formal request to the Chancellor, which includes the rationale for the degree and evidence of formal institutional approval of the degree.
  • If the new degree contains a program that leads to education licensure or endorsement, the Letter of Intent must indicate the areas of licensure or endorsement that the institution intends to offer, as additional reviews will need to be coordinated.
  1. Public Comment Period:  Once the Letter of Intent has been approved, a background summary will be posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ website (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php) for a 10-day public comment period.
  2. Chancellor’s Approval:  The request and public comments are forwarded to the Chancellor for final consideration and approval. 
  3. Certificate of Authorization Issued:  A new or a revised Certificate of Authorization is issued to the institution.  If the institution is incorporated, the institution shall file a copy of the certificate of authorization with the secretary of state as required by section 1713.02 of the Revised Code.

Higher Learning Commission Guidelines for Approval of New Degree Programs

The Higher Learning Commission requires that Miami University notify the Commission when it creates, cancels or suspends an academic degree program.  In most cases, this notification can occur after the degree program has been fully approved.

However, if the degree program has any of the following characteristics, the commission requires that Miami seek approval prior to undergoing the entire approval process:

  • The degree program requires allocation of substantial financial investment or resources;
  • The degree is at a credential level not included in Miami’s accreditation;
  • The degree program offers courses outside the range of Miami programs currently approved by the Commission;
  • 50% or more of the courses or credits in the degree program are provided through alternate delivery.

To seek approval or notify the Higher Learning Commission, please contact Miami’s Office of Institutional Research. 

For information about change approvals from the Higher Learning Commission, see: http://www.ncahlc.org/Information-for-Institutions/institutional-change.html.

Flowchart for New Degree Programs

IMAGE TO BE INSERTED

 

Changes to an Existing Degree Program or Major

Internal Approval Process

Changes to an existing degree program or major require both internal and external forms of approval.  Changes come in two forms:

1)     Additional or minor change which consists of adding a course to an existing menu of course options for the degree or major without increasing the number of credit hours required for the degree;

2)     Significant or major change which includes any of the following:

  • Change in title (e.g. Clinical Laboratory Science to Medical Laboratory Science);
  • Change in total hours for the major;
  • Change in requirements, such as:
  1. Adding a requirement that has never been approved,
  2. Deleting a requirement that was previously approved, or
  3. Changing the number of courses or hours needed to complete an area (e.g., reducing the number of related hours from 15 to 12).

 

An additional or minor change requires approval from the appropriate dean or his or her designee sent to the Office of Registrar so that the change can be made to the General Bulletin and Degree Audit Report.

Significant changes need to undergo the full process of internal approval, using the form available on the Office of Registrar website.  The process includes approvals from the entities articulated below. 

Please note: If the change involves the modification of 50% or more of the requirements of the degree or major, a change to the name of the degree or major, or the creation of a separate degree designation for a specialization currently offered within the existing degree, then approval from the Ohio Board of Regents is necessary. 

Approving Body or Person

Undergraduate

Graduate

Department or Program

*

*

Division

*

*

Graduate Council (graduate degrees only)

 

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

*

University Senate

*

*

Ohio Board of Regents (if the change involves 50% or more of the degree requirements, name change or separate designation)

*

*

Higher Learning Commission Notification

*

*

 

Ohio Board of Regents Approval Process

Undergraduate Degrees

If the degree program change involves the modification of 50% or more of the requirements for the degree or major, then the department or program must seek approval from the Ohio Board of Regents.

The steps needed for approval are described below:

  • Change Request:  The Office of the Provost submits the appropriate Change Request at least three months prior to the planned implementation the changeThe link to the Change Request templates can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents website.  Please contact the Office of the Provost for assistance in submitting the change request.
  • Staff Review of Request and Resolution of Concerns: The Chancellor’s staff members review the request for change to ensure that the proposed changes are in line with the General Standards for Academic Programs and work with the institution to resolve any concerns.   
  • Letter of Acknowledgement:  A letter acknowledging the approval of the change is sent to the president or chief academic officer of the institution.  
Graduate Degrees

The procedures for RACGS institutions making changes to previously approved programs fall into two categories—those requiring RACGS notification only and those that require RACGS approval.  The processes for each are outlined below.

Changes Requiring Notification OnlyChanges to a previously approved program that involve: a) program delivery at an off-campus site; b) program delivery in an online, blended or flexibly delivered form; or c) degree titles are normally handled through a notification process. 

  • The Graduate School which is Miami’s RACGS representative submits the appropriate Change Request electronically to the RACGS listserv (racgs@regents.state.oh.us) at least three months prior to the planned implementation the changeThe link to the Change Request templates can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents website.
  • If the program leads to an education license or endorsement, a separate review is needed.  Coordination of the notification request and the review of the change to the education license or endorsement component will be coordinated by the RACGS administrator.  RACGS members will be notified of the outcome of the education review within 30 days.
  • If a RACGS member does not raise an objection within 45 days of notification, it is assumed that there is no objection to the proposed change, and the proposed change is recommended for approval as an “information item” in the minutes of the next RACGS meeting. 
  • If a RACGS member does respond with an objection, the proposing RACGS member will be notified and asked to respond to the objection.  If no resolution is reached via email, the item will be discussed at the next RACGS meeting, and a formal vote for approval will be taken.  If a majority of RACGS members present approve the proposed change, the proposed change is recommended for approval in the minutes of the RACGS meeting.

Changes Requiring RACGS Review and Approval: Changes to previously approved programs that involve: a) changes to more than 50% of the approved program; b) changes to the degree name or degree designation; or c) requests to create a separate degree designation for a specialization currently offered within an existing degree must be reviewed and formally recommended for approval by RACGS.

  • A request to change greater than 50% of the curriculum within a particular degree designation requires that a Full Proposal be submitted and approved through the normal RACGS process for the approval of new graduate majors or degree programs.  Note that the process is abbreviated, beginning with a Full Proposal rather than with a PDP.
  • A request to change the degree name or the degree designation requires a formal RACGS review.  If the change in the degree name is a change from a research degree to a professional degree, a Full Proposal may be submitted to RACGS without submission of the PDP.  If the proposed change is from a master’s degree or a professional degree to the PhD, the process for approving a new graduate major or degree program, beginning with the PDP, must be followed.
  • A request to create a separate degree designation for a specialization currently offered within an existing degree requires that a Full Proposal be submitted and approved through the normal RACGS process for the approval of new graduate majors or degree programs.  Note that the process is abbreviated, beginning with a Full Proposal rather than with a PDP.
Programs that Lead to Education Licenses and Endorsements

The Ohio Revised Code requires the Chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents to approve changes to programs that lead to education licenses and endorsements.  For the purposes of review, change is defined as a modification of 50% or more to any course, field experience or assessment within a program that leads to an education license or endorsement. 

The following process is used when changes to education programs do not meet the threshold for change to a degree or degree program (e.g., a 50% change to the requirements or delivery), but do meet the threshold for change to a program leading to an education license or endorsement.

  • Submission of the Change Request: The Provost Office submits the appropriate Education Change Request at least three months prior to the planned implementation the changeThe link to the Education Change Request templates can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents website.
  • Staff Review of Request and Resolution of Concerns: The Chancellor’s staff members review the request for change to ensure that the proposed changes are in line with the General Standards for Academic Programs and the standards set by the Ohio Department of Education.  Staff members will work with the institution to resolve any concerns. 
  • Letter of Acknowledgement:  A letter acknowledging the approval of the change is sent to the president or chief academic officer of the institution.  

Withdrawal or Deactivation of an Existing Academic Degree

The guidelines for the consolidation, partition, transfer, or elimination of academic divisions (described above) also apply to academic degree programs.

Undergraduate Major

Guidelines for Submission of an Undergraduate Major

The internal institutional process for proposing any curriculum leading to a new undergraduate major begins with approval by the department after consultation with other departments (where appropriate).

Please note: New majors must be approved by Miami University as well as by the Ohio Board of Regents. To expedite the process, departments are encouraged to work with the Office of the Provost to submit a Letter of Intent to the Ohio Board of Regents early in the internal institutional approval process.  The link to the Letter of Intent template can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents’ website.  For more information on the Ohio Board of Regents’ process of approval, see the “Ohio Board of Regents Guidelines for Approval of New Majors” in this manual.

The internal Miami proposal forms for new majors can be found on the Office of the Registrar website.

 

The proposal must also be approved by the following bodies.

 

Approving Body

New Undergraduate Major

Department or Program

*

Division

*

Council for Undergraduate Curriculum

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

University Senate

*

Ohio Board of Regents

*

 

For more information, see MUPIM 11.1.F.

Changes to an Existing Major

Follow the guidelines articulated in the section, “Changes to an Existing Degree Program or Major” in this manual.

Withdrawal or Deactivation of an Existing Major

 

The Higher Learning Commission requires that Miami University notify the Commission when it cancels or suspends an academic major.  In most cases, this notification can occur after the degree program has been fully approved for cancellation or deactivation.

To seek approval or notify the Higher Learning Commission, please contact Denise Krallman, Director of Miami’s Office of Institutional Research. 

For information about change approvals from the Higher Learning Commission, see: http://www.ncahlc.org/Information-for-Institutions/institutional-change.html.

Ohio Board of Regents Guidelines for Approval of New Majors Within Approved Degrees

According to the Ohio Board of Regents, majors are defined as a course of study within a discipline or interdisciplinary field, which contain more than 30 semester hours.  The steps for approval by the Ohio Board of Regents are articulated below.

  1. Letter of Intent: The institution’s president or chief academic officer submits a Letter of Intent at least 6 months prior to the planned implementation of the new major or degree programThe Letter of Intent may be submitted prior to the completion of internal institutional approval processes.  
  • The link to the Letter of Intent template can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents’ Program Approval website.
  • If the new major or degree program leads to education licensure or endorsement, the Letter of Intent must indicate the areas of licensure or endorsement that the institution intends to offer.  Each area of licensure will require a separate review and a new major or degree program leading to licensure or endorsement may require a site visit.
  1. Posting of Request:  Once the Letter of Intent is received, the institution and name of proposed major or degree program is posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ website:  (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php). 
  2. Submission of ProposalAfter the new degree has received all of the required internal approvals, the institution’s president or chief academic officer submits a Proposal at least 3 months prior to the planned implementation of the new major or degree program.  The Proposal provides information to demonstrate that the major or degree program meets the General Standards for Academic Programs.
  • The link to the Proposal template can be found on the Ohio Board of Regents’ Program Approval website.
  • If the new major or degree program leads to an education license or endorsement, the educator preparation program review will proceed concurrently.
  • A Proposal must be submitted within one year of submission of the Letter of Intent or a new Letter of Intent is required. 
  1. Staff Review of Proposal:  Chancellor’s staff members review the proposal for completeness prior to presentation for expert comment from peer institutions.
  2. Peer Review of Proposal:
  • The proposal will be circulated to a listserv of campus contacts to solicit comments from experts within the discipline. 
  • The peer review will focus on the qualifications, experience and sufficiency of faculty, the adequacy of the curriculum and its alignment with expectations for the discipline, the need for the degree and the resources (e.g., classrooms, libraries, technology, laboratory, equipment) available to support the degree.
  • Peer institutions and the Chancellor’s staff will have 30 days to submit comments to the listserv.
  1. Institutional Response Document:  Proposing institutions will have an opportunity to provide a written response to the peer comments.  This response document must be submitted to the Chancellor’s staff at least 2 months prior to the planned implementation of the new major or degree program.
  2. Resolution of Concerns:  The Chancellor’s staff members will work with the institution proposing the program to address questions or concerns raised during the peer comment period.
  3. Public Comment Period:  If the program is recommended to the Chancellor for approval, a background summary will be posted on the Ohio Board of Regents’ web site (http://regents.ohio.gov/programapproval/pending.php) for a 10-day public comment period.
  4. Chancellor’s Approval:  The background piece and public comments are forwarded to the Chancellor for final approval. 

Higher Learning Commission Guidelines for Approval of New majors

The Higher Learning Commission requires that Miami University notify the Commission when it creates, cancels or suspends an academic major.  In most cases, this notification can occur after the major (or its cancellation or suspension) has been fully approved.

However, if the major has any of the following characteristics, the commission requires that Miami seek approval prior to undergoing the entire approval process:

  • The major requires allocation of substantial financial investment or resources;
  • The major involves a credential not included in Miami’s accreditation;
  • The major offers courses outside the range of Miami programs currently approved by the Commission;
  • 50% or more of the courses or credits in the major are provided through alternate delivery.
  • Courses will be offered at an international location or outside of Ohio.
  • 25% or more of the degree program is outsourced to another accredited or non-accredited institution or consortium.

To seek approval or notify the Higher Learning Commission, please contact Denise Krallman, Director of Miami’s Office of Institutional Research. 

For information about change approvals from the Higher Learning Commission, see: http://www.ncahlc.org/Information-for-Institutions/institutional-change.html.

Flow Chart for New Undergraduate Major

 

INSERT IMAGE HERE.

Undergraduate Minor, Concentration, Focus, or Emphasis

Guidelines for Submission of an Undergraduate Minor

Any new minor shall first be approved by the department or program, after consultation with other departments or programs (where appropriate).

 

Proposal forms for new minors can be found on the Office of the Registrar website.

 

The proposal must also be submitted for approval by the following bodies.

 

Approving Body

Undergraduate

Graduate

Department or Program

*

*

Division

*

*

Graduate Council

 

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

*

University Senate Consent Calendar

*

*

*Only those that require approval by the Regents’ Advisory Committee on Graduate Study (RACGS)

See MUPIM 11.1.G

Changes to an Existing Minor

Changes to an existing minor requires an internal process of approval.  The internal procedures for changing an existing minor are identical to those for making changes to an existing major.

Withdrawal or Deactivation of an Existing Minor

Any revision to a major, minor, certificate, emphasis, concentration, track, or focus, including name changes to the same, at either the undergraduate or graduate level shall first be approved by the department or program, after consultation with other departments or programs (where appropriate).

 

The proposed revision must also be submitted for approval by the following bodies.

 

Approving Body

Undergraduate

Graduate

Department or Program

*

*

Division

*

*

Graduate Council

 

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

*

University Senate Consent Calendar

*

*

*Only those that require approval by the Regents’ Advisory Committee on Graduate Study (RACGS)

See MUPIM 11.1.H

Flow Chart for New Undergraduate Minor

 

Certificate of Study

Definition of a Certificate of Study

A certificate is a formal award certifying the satisfactory completion of an organized program of study at the postsecondary level.  There are different types of certificates:

  • One Year Technical Certificate:  Certificates awarded by two-year colleges for the completion of a minimum of 30 and a maximum of 37 semester credit hours of coursework, with the majority of the coursework completed in a prescribed technical area.  These certificates should be applicable to an associate degree, either at the student’s “home” campus, at another community college within commuting distance, or through a distance education partnership with another campus. 
  • Short Term Technical Certificate:  Certificates awarded by two-year colleges for the completion of less than 30 semester credit hours that are designed for a specific employment situation.
  • Undergraduate Certificate:  An award that requires completion of an organized program of study at the postsecondary level (below the baccalaureate degree) that does not meet the requirements for a bachelor’s degree.  These certificates are classified by IPEDs as either “at least 1 but less than 2 academic years” or “at least two but less than 4 academic years.”
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate:  An award that requires completion of an organized program of study beyond the bachelor’s degree (typically at least 18 semester credit hours); designed for individuals who have completed a bachelor’s degree but do not meet the requirements for a master’s degree.
  • Post-Master’s Certificate:  An award that requires completion of an organized program of study beyond the master’s degree (typically at least 24 semester credit hours or 36 quarter credit hours) designed for individuals who have completed a master’s degree but do not meet the requirements for a doctoral degree. 

The purpose of a certificate program is to serve the needs of both matriculated and non‐degree students interested in developing specific skills and knowledge for personal and/or professional development. The certificate alone is not intended to prepare a student for gainful employment in a recognized occupation. Programs should carefully consider the gainful employment implications of their program prior to development. The following resources may be helpful in making gainful employment determinations of the proposed program:

http://www.ifap.ed.gov/GainfulEmploymentInfo/

Programs are encouraged to contact the General Counsel to determine whether or not their proposed program will require Gainful Employment reporting.

Even though certificate programs are not degree‐bearing, they are usually designated on a student’s official transcript and are as much a reflection on Miami’s quality of education as any other assemblage of courses. As a result, careful consideration should be given to the creation of a new certificate program based not only upon need and interest, but also upon how the program fits into Miami University’s educational portfolio.

Guidelines for Proposing a Certificate of Study

Proposal forms for new certificate programs can be found on the Office of the Registrar website.

 

Any new minor, new certificate, new emphasis, concentration, track, or focus at either the undergraduate or graduate level shall first be approved by the department or program, after consultation with other departments or programs (where appropriate).

 

Note: Some certificates require approval by the Ohio Board of Regents and the Higher Learning Commission.  See “Ohio Board of Regents Guidelines for Certificate Programs’ and “Higher Learning Commission Guidelines for a Certificate of Study” in this manual for more information.

 

Certificate proposals must be approved by the following bodies:

 

Approving Body

Undergraduate

Graduate

Department or Program

*

*

Division

*

*

Graduate Council

 

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

*

University Senate Consent Calendar

*

*

Ohio Board of Regents Change Request (for free-standing certificate programs only)

*

*

Higher Learning Commission Change Request Proposal

 

 

 

For more information, see MUPIM 11.1.G

Changes to an Existing Certificate of Study

Changes to an existing certificate require an internal process of approval.  The internal procedures for changing an existing certificate are identical to those for making changes to an existing major.

Ohio Board of Regents Guidelines for Certificate Programs

If the new certificate program being proposed is free standing, does not require enrollment in a concurrent degree program, or does not lead to an education license or endorsement, then a change request with the Ohio Board of Regents must be submitted.

See the Office of the Provost for information about submitting a change request to the Ohio Board of Regents.

Higher Learning Commission Guidelines for a Certificate of Study

Some types of certificates must be approved by the Higher Learning Commission.  Certificates requiring approval from HLC have the following characteristics:

  • the courses are credit-bearing;
  • the courses may be at any degree level or at the pre-associate’s level;
  • the courses are not a subset of courses extracted from existing degree
  • programs with 50% or more being courses developed for the Certificate program; and
  • the Certificate program is Title IV eligible.*

* Check with Miami’s Office of Student Financial Assistance to determine whether such Certificates are Title IV Eligible.

To seek approval from the Higher Learning Commission, please contact Miami’s Office of Institutional Research.   The online form is available at: http://www.ncahlc.org/Information-for-Institutions/institutional-change.html

Certificates not having the above characteristics do not require separate approval from the Commission and are included in an institution’s accreditation from The Higher Learning Commission.