Courses & Scheduling

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Types of Courses

 

Miami Plan Courses

The Liberal Education Council reviews and approves all Miami Plan courses.  There are four types of Miami Plan course offerings: first-year seminars, foundation courses, thematic sequences, and senior capstones.  Each of these types is described below.

First-Year Seminars

First-Year Seminars are specially designed for first year students and focus on an intellectual theme, problem or issue based on the passion and expertise of the faculty member. Each course fulfills one of the Miami Plan Foundation areas and is limited to 20 students.

Proposal forms for first-year seminars can be found on the Liberal Education website and are typically due at the end of the November for seminars offered during the following academic year.

Faculty are encouraged in the proposal to describe the student learning outcomes for each of the four Miami Plan principles  you expect students to accomplish by completing the seminar. For each outcome, give one example of an assignment, class activity, or other method that you use to help students meet the specified outcome.  

Foundation Courses

There are five categories of Miami Plan Foundation Courses:

  1. 1.      MPF I – Composition
    College Composition focuses especially on helping students learn and apply rhetorical knowledge, methods, and strategies.  Students analyze and construct arguments using rhetorical inquiry; understand, refine, and improve their composing practices; develop critically aware strategies for reading and interpretation; and explore and use alternative modes of exploration and expression.  A key purpose of this foundation is to teach students to deliver writing in a variety of contexts, including digitally networked environments. The essential skills students develop in composition courses help them in their academic work at the university but also in their civic, social, and professional endeavors. 

 

  1. 2.      MPF IIA – Fine Arts
    Offerings in this section prepare students for global engagement as practitioners, creators, advocates, and patrons of the arts.  The courses foster the pursuit of creative and scholarly inquiry by extending artistic traditions, while embracing a culture of innovation and change.

MPF IIB – Humanities
Courses in the humanities contribute to the advancement of cultures. These courses engage students through scholarly investigation of ideas, texts, and people who shape or have been seen to shape human cultures. Students develop skills in literary, historical, cinematic, philosophical, and linguistic analyses while exploring their own place and potential influence in the world.  Promoting creative thinking, critical reasoning, and ethical understanding, humanities courses enable students to interpret local and global issues from diverse perspectives and develop respectful and effective ways they might respond to these issues. 

MPF IIC – Social Science
Courses categorized as social science investigate human behavior, social relationships, and/or the interactions of people with their cultural, social and political environments. Students in social science courses examine a variety of social phenomena including specialized human communities, political processes and structures, interpersonal and intercultural relationships, economic behaviors, psychological phenomena, and the relationships that discrete human populations have with other subnational, national, or international entities.

  1. 3.      MPF IIIB & C - Global Courses and Clusters
    These categories comprise courses or a series of courses focused on themes or issues relevant to the globalized society in which we all live, asking us to situate subject matter and skills relevant that subject in terms of their global implications.  Through their work in G-Courses or G-Clusters, students develop and exercise the ability to communicate and act respectfully across linguistic and cultural differences; explore and understand their place and influence in the changing world; determine and assess relationships among societies, institutions, and systems in terms of reciprocal – though not necessarily symmetrical – interactions, benefits, and costs; describe the development and construction of differences and similarities among contemporary groups and regions; and identify and analyze the origins and influences of global forces.

All MPF IIIB Global Perspectives courses must meet the goal to develop and exercise the ability to communicate and act respectfully across linguistic and cultural differences (the A-goal), and at least 2 of the following goals:

  • Explore and understand place and influence in the changing world.  
  • Determine and assess relationships among societies, institutions, and systems in terms of reciprocal – though not necessarily symmetrical – interactions, benefits, and costs.
  • Describe the development and construction of differences and similarities among contemporary groups and regions.
  • Identify and analyze the origins and influences of global forces.  
  1. 4.      MPF IVA – Biological Science
    Biological sciences involve the study of living organisms, including their origin, compostion, function (molecular, cellular, and organismal) diversity, classification, ecology, evolution, and behavior.  

MPF IVB – Physical Science
Physical Science comprise the disciplines that study the nature of energy and the inorganic world. It is traditionally subdivided into four general areas: chemistry, physics, astronomy, and earth sciences.

  1. 5.      MPF V – Mathematics, Formal Reasoning, Technology
    Courses in this area involve mathematical reasoning. This reasoning could either be problem solving and pattern finding at the inductive level, or formal and abstract reasoning at the deductive level, or a combination of both forms of arguments. In all courses, students’ abilities to develop logical arguments are strengthened and improved. The courses may also provide opportunities for the students to explore the role of formal reasoning in history, society, and the modern world, and to reflect upon its use in formulating well-founded, ethical decisions.
  • Technology RequirementCourses in the technology group should introduce the technical professional’s methodology, including the evaluation of empirical data, problem recognition and definition, and the application of scientific principles. Although skills are included, the primary emphasis should be on developing an awareness of technology’s impact on society.
  • Mathematics Requirement: Courses in this group should introduce logical and systemic methodology used by mathematicians to examine and explore concepts, such as quantity, space, probability, structure, and the study of motions and shapes of physical objects. Courses may include theoretical or applied studies of statistics, calculus, arithmetic, algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.
  • Formal Reasoning Requirement: Courses in this group should provide a formal introduction to logic and methodologies used in deriving conclusions. Students will explore concepts of truth, proof, meaning, and their role in informing and influencing our perceptions, imagination, thought processes, and learned experience. Courses may also include studies of the use of language and reasoning to develop the “what” and “how” of artificial intelligence.

Cultures Requirement
These courses use the United States  and/or other regions of the world as points of departure to encourage students to view the diversity of societies and the issues raised by their diversity. Diversity is broadly defined and may include disability, sexual orientation, race, ethnicity, religion, language or class, but is certainly not limited to these groups. In addition to acquiring knowledge about cultural diversity, students will examine the nature of societies’ ideas concerning others, how ideas about others are developed, the significance of these ideas when interacting with others, and the importance of analysis and evidence when making judgments.

Historical Perspective
Courses that meet this requirement explore particular historical contexts to help students expand their understanding of how we humans have acted and could act, of how we made decisions in different situations, and how we can interpret the same event in different ways.

Thematic Sequence

A thematic sequence is a series of related courses (usually three) that focus on a theme or subject in a developmental way.  Each course builds or expands upon the knowledge or perspective gained from preceding courses, and some sequences prepare students for capstone experiences.  The first course may be a Foundation course and may count as hours in both Foundation and Thematic Sequence requirements. Advanced placement credit may be used for the first Foundation course in a sequence and transfer credit may be applied. In interdepartmental Thematic Sequences, students must select those courses that are offered outside their department of major. 

Students who are following the Global Miami Plan must complete one Thematic Sequence outside the department of their major.  Exceptions to this requirement include either students with majors in two different academic departments or students with minors outside their department of major.  Students are encouraged to complete the Foundation courses before beginning a Thematic Sequence.

Senior Capstone Courses

Miami University capstone courses are designed to culminate a liberal education curriculum (as distinct, for example, from culminating a major) and promote integration and synthesis.  It should also  address Miami’s broader goals for liberal learning, including reflection, informed action, thoughtful decisions, personal moral commitment, ethical understanding, and civic participation.  Special emphasis should be placed on students sharing of ideas for critical review, evaluation and recognition.  Finally, an important characteristic of a Global Miami Plan capstone is student initiative.  Students should be prompted to take initiative in defining problems and carrying through systematic investigation in this capstone experience.

Capstones may be completed in or outside students' majors; in some departments, the Capstone Experience may be a requirement of the major. All Capstones presume a significant scholarly background of specialized study in a major as well as in liberal education course work. In other words, a Capstone does more than culminate years of baccalaureate study: it culminates a student's liberal education.

Ordinarily, a Capstone Experience is taken at Miami and completed in the senior year (minimum of 96 hours concurrently registered or earned). Students who plan to transfer any course to meet the Capstone requirement must obtain permission from the Office of Liberal Education before they take the course.

Proposal forms for all three types of course offerings can be found on the Liberal Education website.

Students may propose their own Senior Capstone Experience. See the Office of Liberal Education’s Current Students page for details.

Independent Studies

 

An independent study is a learning experience that allows a student opportunity for self-directed learning relating to an area of academic and/or professional interest that is not covered in a regular course. The independent study will involve, in a broad sense, critical analysis and application or development of theories and concepts relating to the area of inquiry chosen by the student. Although the student may engage in creative projects or field research, such endeavors must be accompanied by the previously described academic approaches and written assignments.

Independent Study is not intended to be a mechanism for remedying a deficiency in credit hours nor a device for bringing a schedule up to the minimum credit-hour load required by the University.  Accordingly, the following guidelines for independent study apply:

  • the proposed study must not duplicate any course available to the student;
  • the proposal must present a convincing rationale for the intended project;
  • the proposal must provide evidence of a genuine desire to work independently:
  • the proposed study may not normally be used to meet a Miami Plan, divisional, major or minor requirement.

Courses numbered 177, 277, 377 and 477 are independent study courses for undergraduate students. Students can register for one to five hours of independent study each semester (no more than 10 per year). Registration for each course is in accordance with the level of instruction. Independent study projects must be approved by the instructor and the department chair.

Special Topics Courses

Departments and programs are encouraged to try out new course material on an experimental basis through the use of a special topics course number before formally proposing as a new course with a permanent number. The designated course number approved for offering an experimental course is 300, and it normally carries one to three credits. A student cannot receive more than six semester hours of credit for this type of course.

Proliferation of courses without consideration for student demand or strength of course offerings in related areas should be avoided.

The use of special topics number (300) for the experimental introduction of new courses is encouraged under two conditions: 

  • the content of the course is manifestly appropriate to the department or program offering it; and
  • the experimental course be proposed as a new permanent course with a permanent number and approved through regular University procedures prior to its being scheduled for a third time.    

A special topic is only permitted to be offered two times. A third offering as a special topic may be permitted upon approval by the Dean of the appropriate division. 

Credit Workshops

A Miami University credit workshop includes one or several Miami University courses, but they are flexibly scheduled and offered in various locations: on campus, online, in the US, or abroad. The courses vary in length and content.  Below are some key features of credit workshops:

  • Workshops offer Miami credit – exactly the same credit a student receives in a traditional course on campus.
  • A faculty member may offer a related group of existing courses or newly developed courses and teach them at an abroad location.
  • Credit may fulfill Miami major or minor requirements and some workshops meet capstone, thematic sequence, or independent study and research program requirements.  For example, a student can receive six credits of a language in about four weeks of intensive cultural study abroad, allowing for time during the standard fall or spring term to enroll in other courses and stay on track toward degree requirements.

For more information on creating and offering an international workshop, please review the OIE website.

MUDEC (Luxembourg) Courses

MUDEC offers faculty a unique opportunity to offer highly interactive courses in Luxembourg.

Full-time MUDEC professors also play an important role in student advising, counseling, and guidance.  They live at the Center in Differdange, Luxembourg and have a variety of opportunities to interact with the students.  They also participate in the various extracurricular activities sponsored by MUDEC and in academic and social functions in the Luxembourg community.

Eligibility: All tenured, tenure-track, clinical faculty, as well as lecturers, may apply. Adjuncts and Visiting Assistant professors are not eligible. Interested faculty should possess sufficient familiarity with Europe and be able to incorporate topics dealing with modern Europe into their proposed courses. They should expect and welcome a high level of contact with their students. Faculty applying for positions at MUDEC must be full-time employees of the University. Faculty members employed under the “Retire-Rehire” Program are not eligible for these positions.

Semester Study Tour Course Professor Program

This is a full-year appointment, and faculty may apply for one or two years.  Each semester, the faculty member teaches two courses: a 3+1 hour semester study tour course and a three-hour sprint study tour course.  Professors are required to offer the same set of courses in the fall and spring terms.  Specific components of each of the two types are as follows:

  • Semester study tour course - This is a three-credit hour Europe-focused course (with minimum prerequisites) in the faculty member’s discipline linked to a 1-credit study tour. The typical class size is 25-30 students. Semester study tour courses include a six-day (five-night) study tour in which the professor and students travel together to enhance and illustrate the materials presented in the classroom. The study tour includes the equivalent of 12.5 hours of visits, tours, lectures or other experiences directly related to the course. During that week, the study tours replace the usual class meetings. Semester study tour course faculty members assume the academic leadership of the tour while logistics are provided during the tour by an accompanying MUDEC staff member. Assistance with travel arrangements is provided by the Center staff.

 

  • Sprint study tour course – Offered as a sprint course, the three-hour course must include a five-day (four-night) study tour similar in nature to the semester course study tour. All students are required to take one of the sprint study tour courses. The study tour should be an integral component of the course, designed to illustrate and enhance the topics and issues discussed in the classroom. Based on contact hours and the depth of the academic experience, the actual study tour will be considered equivalent to one credit hour. The sprint study-tour course meets three hours per week but meets in the classroom for only the first seven weeks of the semester. The sprint study tour typically occurs in the fourth, fifth, or sixth week of the fall or spring term, followed by one or two weeks to wrap up the course.

Sprint Study Tour Course Professor Program

Two Sprint Course Professor positions are offered each semester. The sprint course is a single three-hour course that will have a built-in, five-day (four-night) study tour. The study tour typically occurs in the fourth or fifth week of the semester. Every MUDEC student is required to take one of the sprint study tour courses. Class size is 25 students.

The sprint study tour course professor’s study tour should be an integral component of the course, designed to illustrate and enhance the topics and issues discussed in the classroom. A well-designed study tour has a mix of academic, topical and cultural visits, tours, lectures or other experiences. Based on contact hours and the depth of the academic experience, the actual study tour is considered equivalent to one credit hour. Sprint Course faculty assume the academic leadership of the tour while logistics will be provided during the tour by an accompanying MUDEC staff member.

Summer Workshop Professor Program

Faculty may offer workshop courses during the summer and winter terms.  Three seven-week courses are taught during the summer term. Class sizes are between 35-40 students. Applicants should submit a proposal for one three-hour Europe-focused course in the faculty member’s discipline. This course should fall into one of two categories:

  1. Two of the courses each include a six-day (five-night) study tour, which typically occurs during the second, fourth or fifth week of the session. During that week, the study tour replaces the usual class meetings. The study tour should be an integral component of the course, designed to illustrate and enhance the topics and issues discussed in the classroom. Based on contact hours and the depth of the academic experience, the study tour is considered equivalent to two credit hours. For the rest of the session, the class meets three days per week (55 minutes per class). Summer workshop faculty members assume the academic leadership of the tour while logistics are provided during the tour by an accompanying MUDEC staff member.
  2. The third course is a conventional three-hour Europe-focused course with no study tour. It meets three days per week (90 minutes per class) for five weeks. In addition, there are two week-long breaks corresponding to the other courses' study tours.

Study Abroad

Miami University has three offices on campus offering study abroad opportunities.

Office of International Education – Study abroad advisors and staff in the OIE will work with students interested in study abroad. Advisors will assist students in finding a program that best fits the student’s needs. This office also facilitates application and enrollment in exchange programs through other universities or education abroad programs abroad. (MacMillan Hall)

Miami University Dolibois European Center (MUDEC) -- The Miami University campus in Luxembourg offering a wide variety of courses each semester taught by Miami faculty as well as European faculty. Students may apply for spring or fall semester, or the academic year. (MacMillan Hall)

Global Initiatives – This extended education office administers and supports study abroad credit workshops in the fall and spring semester, as well as during winter, spring, and summer breaks. Workshops vary in length from a few weeks to a full semester. Some service learning, not for credit, programs are also offered. All programs are led by Miami faculty.  This office also provides global assistance, passport guidance, risk management, among other services.  It is located in 127 McGuffey Hall.

Honors Courses

University Honors Program course offerings come in two formats:

  1. An honors-only seminar, course or co-curricular experience (newly designed or an enhanced version of an existing course or program).
  2. An honors "contract" course or co-curricular experience which is a regular course or co-curricular experience in which the honors students in that course or experience complete additional assignment(s) for honors credit.

Note: Both options listed above can be at the introductory or intermediate levels.

Proposal forms and information can be found on the University Honors Program website.

Courses with Prefixes from One Division Offered by Faculty in Another Division

On occasion, a course which carries the prefix (known as a “subject code”) from a department or program in one division may be offered by faculty whose appointment resides in another division.  This situation can occur when:

1)     A qualified faculty member whose appointment resides in one division offers a course that was created and approved by faculty in a department or program in another academic division (e.g., School of Creative Arts faculty member wants to teach a College of Arts & Science course); or

2)     A qualified faculty member whose appointment resides in one division wants to design and offer a new course carrying the prefix or subject code of a department or program housed in another division (e.g., a regional division faculty member with a PhD in English wants to offer a new ENG course that has never been offered before).

 

In both situations, the following guidelines must be followed:

  • Instructors must notify and request permission from the Miami University department or program that owns the course prefix or subject code.
  • Instructors who are not members of the unit that owns the course prefix or subject code must hold similar qualifications as the faculty within the unit holding the course prefix.
  • The course offered by the new faculty member with an appointment in another division must follow similar content, outcomes, pace, rigor, and pre-requisites as the same course taught by faculty in the host department or program.

 

When a faculty member with an appointment in one division wishes to offer an existing course with a prefix from a department or program in another division, special efforts must be made to maintain academic continuity and quality of the course.   The faculty member and host academic department or program should engage in the following activities the first time the faculty member teaches the course[1]:

  • participation in a course-specific meeting facilitated by the relevant Miami academic department;
  • syllabi review by permanent Miami faculty from the host academic department or program;
  • regular communication between the instructor and a faculty liaison in the academic department or program which developed the course.

 

After teaching the course the initial time, continuing conversations between the faculty member and the academic department or program which developed the course are expected.

When a faculty member whose appointment resides in one division wants to design and offer a new course carrying the prefix or subject code of a department or program housed in another division, he or she should propose the course to the host department.  The course should undergo the same university approval processes as any new course offered within the host department and division.

In rare cases, a conflict may arise between the instructor and the host department.  In this situation, the instructor and the chair or director of the host department or program should approach each of their divisional deans, and the deans should attempt to resolve the conflict.  If the divisional deans are unable to resolve the conflict, the deans should approach the Provost who will make a final decision.

Service-Learning Courses

Miami University defines Service-Learning as “an experiential pedagogical practice that uses action and reflection to meet needs and enhance learning through mutually beneficial, reciprocal partnerships.”

Faculty may apply for the Service-Learning (SL) Designation by submitting their syllabus to the Office of Community Engagement and Service at slclgroup@muohio.edu. The course must meet the following broad criteria:

  • The course has a formal, academic curriculum that is rooted in the discipline in which the course is offered;
  • The course provides structured opportunities, in and out of class, for students to connect their service activities to the course curriculum; 
  • The course contains academically relevant and well organized community based learning projects, developed in authentic partnership with community leadership, through which students directly serve a constituency;
  • Assessment is defined in course grading and learning objectives; 
  • Community based learning is incorporated into the course’s learning objectives.
  • Faculty seeking the “SL” Designation for a course will submit the syllabus and Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) and Service Plan to the Office of Community Engagement and Service. Please email slclgroup@muohio.edu to begin the process of the MOU.

Faculty who choose not to embed Service-Learning into the course for all students may choose the option of a ‘plus one’ credit for students who wish to participate in service that is related to the course content. [CS1] 

Proposal forms to apply for the Service-Learning designation for your course can be found on the Office of Community Engagement & Service website.

Cross-Listed Courses

A cross-listed course is the same course catalogued under two or more prefixes (also known as subject codes). Cross-listing of courses can provide faculty an opportunity to collaborate across disciplinary and departmental lines, and it offers students the opportunity to engage in multidisciplinary, cross-disciplinary and interdisciplinary learning.  Cross-listing may also benefit departments and programs through the sharing of resources and ideas.

Cross-listing should be done more purposefully and sparingly to indicate a true overlap of disciplinary foundations.  Below are some general cross-listing guidelines proposed by the Academic Policy Committee:

  1. Students may only earn credit for the same course under one prefix. If the course is repeatable for credit, students may only retake the course under the same prefix as the previous attempt. Students may sign up under any prefix of a cross-listed course (except if it is being repeated for credit), but they may be advised according to academic program requirements (where applicable).

 

  1. Cross-listed courses and proposals must be identical in title, prerequisites, description, credits, grading practice, meeting times and days, and number of times a course may be taken for credit.  When possible the cross-listed courses should carry the same course number.

 

  1. Permanent courses should not be cross-listed with special topics or temporary courses under other prefixes.

 

  1. Cross-listed courses should only be cross-listed with courses at the same level.  For example, MTH 2XX should not be cross-listed with PHY 3XX.  The cross-listing of 400/500 courses is an obvious exception.

 

  1. Each course description in the Bulletin and on u.Direct should end with: "Cross-listed with [prefix]."

 

  1. There is a recommended limit of three or fewer prefixes for cross-listed courses.

 

Distance Learning Courses

Miami University offers both online and hybrid courses.  Online workshops are taught 100% online, whereas hybrid workshops combine the traditional face to face classroom experience with the flexibility of online.  Online courses are required to promote learning that is comparable in quality to face-to-face courses.

For best practices in distance learning course design, see the Quality Matters rubric.  For more information on best practice in process variable, consult the Sloan Framework.   

Advanced Learning Technologies (ALT) provides instructional technology support to faculty and specializes in integrating technology components with teaching practices. Specialties include; instructional design, technology, multimedia, and course assessment. Staff members are available to help in online/hybrid course design, Niihka support, and other forms of technology enhancement. We provide the expertise that can enable instructors to successfully integrate necessary technology into the classroom to better the learning process.  ALT is located in 307 Laws Hall. Phone: 513.529.6068.

For additional information on designing distance learning courses, please consult the CELTUA website resources: http://www.units.muohio.edu/celt/resources/strategies.php#DistanceLearningElectronic

Dual Enrollment Courses

Dual Enrollment allows State of Ohio high school students enrolled in State of Ohio public, community and nonpublic high schools to earn college credit and/or high school graduation credit through successful completion of college courses. 

Ohio lawmakers originally enacted the PSEOP in 1989 for 11th and 12th grade students; it was expanded in 1997 to include students in 9th and 10th grades. In 1999, additional legislation restricted eligibility to students carrying at least a 3.0 grade-point average in the subject they wish to pursue at the postsecondary level. Public and nonpublic high school students may enroll in nonsectarian, college-level courses and receive college credit and/or credit toward graduation from high school.

Dual Enrollment Course Qualifications

  • PSEOP courses must be open to any student, not just those pursuing the PSEO program.
  • Dual enrollment course offerings should preferably be existing Transfer Assurance Guidelines (TAG) courses approved by the Ohio Board of Regents.  Using TAG courses guarantees the transfer of credits among Ohio public colleges and universities.
  • Dual enrollment options must follow the same college content, pace, rigor, and pre-requisites (syllabi, assessment and textbooks) as the courses taught to traditional Miami students.
  • Dual enrollment courses have undergone the approval processes for all Miami courses as articulated in MUPIM, section 11, and are included in the Miami Bulletin.
  • Dual enrollment courses that have a study abroad component cannot enroll students who are under the age of 18 years.  High school students under the age of 18 may enroll in courses with a study abroad component that are specifically designed for high school students and only enroll high school students.
  • Instructors must be approved by the Miami University department or program offering the course.
  • Instructors who are not members of the Miami faculty must hold the same qualifications as Miami University instructors for the course taught.
  • Instructors must hold a degree from a nationally accredited institution recognized by the US Department of Education or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation or equivalent as verified by a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services.  The degree must be at least one level above that of the program in which they are teaching with demonstrated expertise in that area.  At least a master’s degree is required for instructors of general education (Miami Plan) courses.
  • For programs involving clinical faculty, the credentials and involvement of clinical faculty meet applicable professional standards for the delivery of the educational experience.
  • Special efforts must be made to maintain academic continuity and quality if instructors teach at a school district site.  The efforts include participation in a course-specific orientation session facilitated by the relevant Miami academic department; classroom observations and syllabi review by permanent Miami faculty from the host academic department or program; regular communication between the dual enrollment instructor and a Miami University faculty liaison in the academic department offering the course; and periodic discipline-specific professional development.

Dual Enrollment Instructor Qualifications

Dual Enrollment Student Qualifications

Ohio high school students enrolled in a public, community, or nonpublic high school, may be eligible. Homeschooled students who are enrolled in an Ohio public high school are eligible. Students must have a minimum of a 3.00 high school grade point average in the subject they wish to study at the postsecondary institution.

Years of eligibility is based on the first year of entry into the Dual Enrollment Program:

  • 9th graders may enroll for up to 12 quarters, eight semesters, or the equivalent of four academic years.
  • 10th graders may enroll for up to nine quarters, six semesters or the equivalent of three academic years.
  • 11th graders may enroll for up to six quarters, four semesters or the equivalent of two academic years.
  • 12th graders may enroll for up to three quarters, two semesters or the equivalent of one academic year.
  • Students enrolling in mid-year in any grade will have their eligibility prorated.

Participation in any Miami University dual enrollment program does not imply or guarantee admission to the Oxford campus of Miami University as a degree-seeking student. Students who desire admission to Miami University, Oxford campus, as degree-seeking students must complete separate applications and participate in a competitive admission process. Admission to Miami University’s regional campuses remains open admission.

All grades earned in courses taken at Miami University will become part of the academic record and will be permanently maintained at Miami University.

 

For Ohio Public High School Students

Students who participate in the PSEOP option (i.e., enroll in a Miami course offered on a Miami campus or on a high school campus in the fall or spring term) may choose from the following two options:

  • Option A allows the public, community or nonpublic high school student to choose, upon enrollment, college credit or both high school and college credit. Student pays all fees and expenses.
  • Option B allows the student to receive both high school and college credit. For public high school and community school students, there is no transfer of tuition between student and college. The high school’s state foundation will pay the college directly. If the student is enrolled in a nonpublic high school, the cost is subsidized by funds set aside by the Ohio General Assembly in each biennium and awarded on a grade-level rotation. Public, community and nonpublic high school students electing this option will not be required to pay for tuition, books, materials or fees that are directly related to a course. However, parents should inquire to ensure that they are fully informed about any general fees that may be charged by the college or university that would be the responsibility of the family.

Students who enroll in the Advanced High School option (i.e., enroll in a Miami course offered on a Miami campus or a high school campus in the summer or winter term) receive only college credit and are responsible for covering all fees and expenses.

For Nonpublic Ohio high school students:

Nonpublic Ohio high school students may enroll in a Miami course offered on a Miami campus.  However, the nonpublic high school students are responsible for all fees and expenses.

Nonpublic Ohio students may be eligible for some support.  For nonpublic students, the cost of the PSEOP program (i.e., enrolling in Miami courses during the fall and spring terms) is covered by a specified amount determined by the Ohio Legislature. Once accepted by an Ohio college or university, each year the non-public student must submit an application form, along with a copy of the college's letter of acceptance and signatures from the student, parent, guidance counselor and college administrator. This must be done before submitting the application for approval by the Ohio Department of Education's Center for School Options and Finance. The application form will not be processed without the required signatures and letter of acceptance. (The requirement to attach the letter of acceptance will be waived if the official seal or stamp of the post-secondary institution is affixed to the application.)

Student applicants will be awarded one allocation unit based on a grade-level rotation, starting with the seniors, and continuing with juniors, sophomores and freshman, respectively, until all the allocation units have been allotted. An allocation unit equals either 6 quarter hours or 4 semester hours in the student's chosen college. This process will continue until there is not sufficient appropriation to award all applicants in a grade level with one additional allocation unit.

If there is not sufficient appropriation to award all applicants in a grade level with one addition allocation unit, the department will conduct a lottery to determine which students within the affected grade level receive the additional allocation units remaining.

Dual Enrollment Admission

All students must submit completed application packets, indicating their choice of course and campus, to the Regional Admission Office by May 1 for consideration for the fall term and November 1 for the spring and winter terms. For students in good standing who were accepted for previous terms during the same academic year, the application packet for the previous term plus current class schedule, course and campus selection will suffice for subsequent terms during that academic year. No application will be considered until the application packet is completed..   

The application packet must contain:

  • Completed dual enrollment application (Parts 1, 2, and 3) with original signatures
  • Non-refundable application fee
  • Official high school transcript and current class schedule. A middle school grade report is required in lieu of the high school transcript for applicants entering their first semester of 9th grade. These must be sent to Miami directly from the high school.
  • Official ACT or SAT test scores are highly recommended. These must be sent to Miami directly from the testing service and should be received by the University either before or soon after the application is submitted.
  • Written recommendation from a teacher in the subject area in which the student is requesting course placement. The letter should address the student's academic ability and emotional maturity to successfully participate in college classes. Recommendations are required only of applicants in the 9th grade or first time applicants in the 10th grade

 

If the student does not attend after being accepted and enrolled for the fall term, the application will be inactivated and the student must reapply in order to participate in the spring term.

Students must maintain the following criteria in order to continue in the program from term to term:

  • Minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA at Miami University;
  • Continue to meet the high school requirements for their grade level.

Students must commute from the home of their parent/legal guardian.

Residency is established for the Dual Enrollment Program based on enrollment in a qualifying Ohio high school. Therefore, an exchange student enrolled in a qualifying Ohio high school (regardless of the visa type) qualifies as a state resident and is eligible to participate in the program.

Participation during 9th grade

  • The 8th grade performance report must show superior performance in all academic areas.
  • Students must place "college ready" in at least two out of three areas (one being reading) of the COMPASS English, Math and Reading assessment program. College ready math placement is defined at MTH 125—pre calculus or higher.
    • Optional: If a student has taken the ACT or SAT test and scores at or above a 21 ACT composite or 1000 SAT (critical reading/math) only the math portion of the COMPASS assessment will be required.
  • A written recommendation from the sending school indicating the student demonstrates the academic ability and emotional maturity to successfully participate in college classes. The letter should be written by a teacher in the subject area in which the applicant is requesting course placement. Limited to one PSEOP course per term.

Participation during 10th grade

  • Complete a minimum of 5 units of the minimum core of 16 college preparatory units
  • Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 on a 4.0 scale.
  • Students must place "college ready" in at least two out of three areas (one being reading) of the COMPASS English, Math and Reading assessment program. College ready math placement is defined at MTH 125—pre calculus or higher.
    • Optional: If a student has taken the ACT or SAT test and scores at or above a 21 ACT composite or 1000 SAT (critical reading/math) only the math portion of the COMPASS assessment will be required.
  • First-time applicants must submit a written recommendation from the sending high school indicating the student demonstrates the academic ability and emotional maturity to successfully participate in college classes. The letter should be written by a teacher in the subject area in which the applicant is requesting course placement. Limited to one PSEOP course per term.

Participation during 11th grade

  • Complete a minimum of 9 units of the minimum core of 16 college preparatory units
  • Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 on a 4.0 scale.
  • Students must place "college ready" in at least two out of three areas (one being reading) of the COMPASS English, Math and Reading assessment program. College ready math placement is defined at MTH 125—pre calculus or higher.
  1. 1.       Optional: If a student has taken the ACT or SAT test and scores at or above a 21 ACT composite or 1000 SAT (critical reading/math) only the math portion of the COMPASS assessment will be required.

Participation during 12th grade

  • Complete a minimum of 13 units of the minimum core of 16 college preparatory units
  • Students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 on a 4.0 scale
  • Students must place "college ready" in at least two out of three areas (one being reading) of the COMPASS English, Math and Reading assessment program. College ready math placement is defined at MTH 125—pre calculus or higher.
    • Optional: If a student has taken the ACT or SAT test and scores at or above a 21 ACT composite or 1000 SAT (critical reading/math) only the math portion of the COMPASS assessment will be required.

Dual Enrollment Application Information

The primary point of contact for students pursuing dual enrollment options is the high school guidance counselor.

Students considering dual enrollment options should check with the counselor for more information. Dual enrollment requires that the high school provide counseling to students and parents to inform them of possible risks and consequences of taking part in the program, such as:

  • Limited funding that may result in the rejection of some students from the program
  • Possible inability to complete the public, community or nonpublic school's graduation requirements
  • Obligation of the student/family to reimburse the state for the amount of funds paid to the college for any uncompleted or failed course.

Students and parents must sign a form indicating that appropriate counseling was provided and all responsibilities for participation are understood.

 

Dual Enrollment Withdrawal, Retention, and Continuation

If a student wants to drop a course, students/parents may have to reimburse the high school, depending on the school district policy. If the student receives a grade (including W) the University will claim reimbursement from the state.

A student may drop a course during the first 20 percent of the course, in which case no grade or other designation will appear on the student's official record. Students should refer to the Academic Calendar on the Office of the Registrar website (http://www.units.muohio.edu/reg/calendars/) for specific academic deadline dates.

  • A student may drop a course after the first 20 percent is completed but before 60 percent of the course is completed with a signature of acknowledgement from the instructor and CAS Advising Office. A grade of W will be recorded.
  • After 60 percent of the course is complete, a student may no longer withdraw from a course, unless a petition is approved by the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers. The petition must include the signatures of the course instructor and the student's academic or divisional adviser. The petition must also describe and document the extenuating circumstances (extraordinary circumstances usually beyond the student's control) that form the grounds of the petition. If the petition for withdrawal is approved, the student will be withdrawn from the course with a grade of W. Only in rare circumstances will a petition to withdraw from a course after 60 percent of the course is complete be approved for reasons of academic performance alone. When possible, a student should continue to attend class until the Interdivisional Committee of Advisers has acted on his or her petition. Non-attendance does not void financial responsibility or a grade of F.

 

If a student does not maintain a 2.00 or better cumulative GPA in Miami University coursework, he or she will not be able to continue in the program. A letter will be sent to the student with copies to the high school, informing them of this action.

For registration purposes, PSEOP students are not considered to be "continuing students", that is, they must continue to register on a space available basis after all regular Miami University students have had an opportunity to register.

If a student fails a course OR withdraws from a course after the deadline, the high school may opt to collect the cost of the course from the student/parent. The State of Ohio has a formula that the high schools use for calculating the amount the student would owe.

Dual Enrollment Academic Support

Students in the Miami dual enrollment programs have access to academic support services and resources that enable them to succeed in college-level courses.  Support services include an assigned academic advisor and an orientation session that includes information about the program.

Graduate Level Courses for Undergraduate Students

Undergraduate students who have earned 64 or more credit hours and have a GPA of 3.00 or greater may request permission to enroll in 500 or 600 level graduate courses.  Students must obtain permission from the instructor, the department chair, and the Dean of the Graduate School.  Students may double-count up to 12 hours of graduate course work toward their undergraduate degree.  With permission of the appropriate advisor(s) and dean(s) or their designee(s), these students may count the graduate courses toward their major, minor, electives, and university requirements.  Graduate courses taken in this manner will be treated as graduate level non-degree courses.  A maximum of 12 hours of graduate non-degree courses may count toward a graduate degree program at Miami (see Miami Bulletin).

Non-Degree Status (p. 217 in 2012-13 Bulletin)

If undergraduate students would like to take graduate-level courses, but do not intend to pursue a graduate degree, they can apply for admission with “continuing non-degree graduate status.” After the student is  admitted, he or she can earn an unlimited number of graduate hours within an indefinite period of time; however only 12 hours may be applied to a degree program.

To apply for admission, students should submit to the Graduate School:

  • Completed admission application form;
  • Nonrefundable application fee;

If students are admitted as a non-degree student, they will not be able to enroll in certain courses if the department or program has limited enrollment; students who have been admitted to a degree-granting program have first priority. Students should check with the department about enrollment restrictions. If a student has been denied regular or conditional admission to a degree program, she or he can enroll in courses in that department as a non-degree student only if the department grants permission. If the student takes courses as a non-degree student after he or she has been denied admission as a degree student, these courses cannot be applied to a future degree program.

Courses Meeting Ohio Board of Regents Requirements (TAGs and OTMs)

Transfer Assurance Guides

H.B. 95 mandated that the Ohio Board of Regents establish policies and procedures applicable to all state institutions of higher education to ensure that students can begin higher education at any state institution of higher education and transfer coursework and degrees to any other state institution of higher education without unnecessary duplication or institutional barriers. The policy provided a means to ensure that transfer and “native” students would be treated equitably, with the same ability to compete for admissions to specific programs. The essential components of H.B. 95 mandated the following:

  • Assure transfer of coursework and degrees without unnecessary duplication;
  • Modify courses, as needed, to strengthen content and ensure equivalencies;
  • Use a universal course equivalency classification system to eliminate inconsistent judgment in transfer credit application;
  • Admit students with associate degrees to state institutions on an equally competitive basis with native students for specific programs, and with priority over out-of-state associate degree graduates and out-of-state transfer students.

Ohio’s Articulation and Transfer Policy (1990) was designed to improve the mobility of students among colleges and universities within the state. A central feature of the enhanced policy is the development of Transfer Assurance Guides (TAG). TAGs are groups of foundational courses that represent a commonly accepted pathway to the Bachelor’s degree. Courses or course sequences identified as being a part of the TAG may be offered at any public higher education institution in Ohio.

  • The goal of a TAG is to recognize comparable, compatible and equivalent courses at or above the 70% standard of equivalency adopted by the Articulation and Transfer Advisory Council. TAGs apply across, at least, all public higher education institutions in Ohio and embody commonly accepted pathways to majors within the Bachelor’s degree. This does not alter the mission or degree authority of any institution; it does provide guaranteed pathways that enable students to reach their bachelor’s degree goals in the most efficient manner.
  • The TAGs are composed of courses and learning outcomes. Consensus on courses commonly included in particular Bachelor’s degree discipline pathways are based on the evaluation of the content and performance expectations on a course-by-course basis within each TAG. When consensus is established, students are assured not only of the equivalency of the courses, but of their application to the degree objective.

The TAGs are divided into various subgroups and given an Ohio Articulation Number (OAN).  For more information on the different categories and OANs, see below:

  1. English Composition (OEN)
  2. Mathematics & Statistics (OMT)
  3. Natural & Physical Sciences (OSC)
  4. Social Sciences (OSS)
  5. Engineering Science (OES) & Engineering Technologies (OET)
  6. Business (OBU)
  7. Communication (OCM)
  8. Arts & Humanities (OAH)
  9. Health (OHL)
  10. Education (OED)
  11. History (OHS)
  12. Fire Science (OFS)
  13. Renewable Energy (ORE)

Ohio Transfer Module

The Ohio Transfer Module is a subset of general education courses that, when taken in its entirety, is guaranteed to transfer from campus to campus and provides a student the means to make substantial progress on general education requirements.

A copy of Miami’s OTM is available on the Ohio Board of Regents website.

Course Design and Approval

Principles of Course Design

Many of the decisions affecting the success of a course take place well before the first day of class. Careful planning at the course design stage not only makes teaching easier and more enjoyable, it also facilitates student learning. Once your course is planned, teaching involves implementing your course design on a day-to-day level.

To design an effective course, you need to:

  1. 2.       Consider basic logistical issues, such as how your course fits into the major or department’s curricular goals, how many class meetings times and hours there will be, and what type of classroom space is available. How large is your class?  How many credit hours?  What time of day will you be teaching?  What technology is installed in the room?  What other technologies are available for your use?  Is there certain material you must address?
  2. 3.       Understand your students.  What prior knowledge or preparation might they have for your course? What is their personal and intellectual level of development or maturity?  How might the cultural differences among your students impact your teaching?  What generational experiences and expectations might your students have?
  3. 4.       Identify your learning objectives or outcomes.  What knowledge and skills do you want your students to acquire by the end of the course? Phrase your objectives using action verbs, such as “Apply theorems to solve problems.”  Make sure the objectives are measurable so that you will know whether students accomplished what you hoped.
  4. 5.       Align your assessments with your objectives.  Examinations, papers, projects, homework assignments, and classroom activities should be crafted to advance and measure the objectives. 
  5. 6.       Identify appropriate teaching approaches, such as lectures, discussions, case studies, service-learning, writing, group or individual projects which will promote the course learning objectives.
  6. 7.       Plan your course content and schedule, and write the syllabus.  Syllabi communicate the design of the course—its goals, organization, expectations, and requirements—to students.  Key components of the syllabus include:
  • Course number, title, term, year, meeting times, location, office hours, contact information
  • Course description
  • Prerequisites and co-requisites
  • Learning objectives or outcomes, including the role the course plays in the Miami Plan
  • Materials needed
  • Course requirements
  • Evaluation, assessment and grading policy
  • Other policies and expectations (attendance, academic honesty, disability accommodations, food in class, laptop use, student behavior, etc.)
  • Organization and schedule.

 

For assistance on course design and teaching, please consult the Center for the Enhancement of Learning, Teaching and University Assessment.

Course Approval Processes

There are two types of course approval processes: one for new courses that will be offered on a permanent basis (i.e., more than three times) and another for new courses that will only be offered no more than two times.  The course must be approved as a permanent course before it is offered for a third time.

New Permanent Courses

A proposal for a new permanent course shall first be approved by the department or program, after consultation with other departments or programs where appropriate. The proposal must also be submitted for approval by the following bodies.

 

Approving Body

Undergraduate

Graduate

Department or Program

*

*

Division

*

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

*

University Senate Consent Calendar

*

*

 

Any permanently approved course may have modifiers to allow students to register for the course more than once or to focus on specific content (hence, different titles) within a very large body of material. Requests for new modifiers of a non-topics course are treated as revisions to an existing course.

See MUPIM 11.1.A.1.

New Temporary Courses

When special course offerings are demanded by circumstances such as changes in staff, the divisional dean may grant temporary approval. The dean may also grant temporary approval to a new course that a department or program wishes to test before seeking permanent approval. A course may be offered under this temporary provision for no more than two terms. All requests for temporary course approval must include learning outcomes and shall be forwarded, with a recommendation, by the appropriate dean to the Office of the Registrar. If the temporary course request involves a graduate-level course, the Dean of the Graduate School must also approve it.

See MUPIM 11.1.A.2.

Proposal Forms

Forms are available on the Office of the Registrar website.  Questions related to course approvals may be directed to: courseapproval@MiamiOH.edu.

Academic Calendar

Faculty members are encouraged to consult the academic calendar when developing their syllabi.  Note especially the following items:

  • Start and end dates of the term
  • Mid-term break dates
  • Mid-term grades: Faculty are encouraged to schedule a significant assignment prior to the mid-term grading date in order to have enough information to complete the mid-term grade and to enable the student to understand their progress in the course thus far.
  • Final examination schedule time.
Faculty should also note the religious holidays.

Course Numbering

Course numbers are designed to inform the student and public about the course level and audience.  The following guidelines are used by the University Registrar to assign Miami course numbers.

000-099: Developmental courses, generally not creditable toward a degree.

100-199: Introductory courses, usually with no prerequisites.

200-299: Sophomore level courses.

300-399: Junior level courses.

400-499: Senior level courses.

500-850: Graduate level courses. Under particular conditions, a junior in the University Honors Program or a Miami senior may take 500- and 600-level courses for graduate credit with permission. Seniors who wish to earn undergraduate credit in a 600-level course must have approval of the course instructor, department chair, and dean of the Graduate School.

599 and 699: Workshops or similar offerings. Workshops must go through an approval process each year.

700 and above: Restricted to graduate students.

Course numbers at two levels (such as 433/533) may be taken either for undergraduate or graduate credit. Graduate students must complete additional work to receive graduate credit.

Course numbers separated by a comma (such as 233, 234) are related. You may take one of the series and they may be taken in any order (unless otherwise indicated in the course description).

Course numbers separated by a hyphen (such as 233-234) must be taken in numerical order and both must be taken to receive credit for graduation.

Special Course Numbers

100: Each department in the College of Arts and Science can offer a seminar numbered 100, cross-listed with at least two departments. This course number is reserved especially to allow students and faculty a chance to learn how different disciplines deal with the same problem. The 100 course has one or two  hours of credit; a student cannot receive more than four hours credit for all courses numbered 100. These courses may not be offered every year.

300: This course, Special Topics, is offered according to student request together with instructor permission. It carries one to three semester hours of credit; students cannot receive more than six hours of credit for this course.

177, 277, 377, and 477: These courses are independent study for undergraduate students. A student can register for one to five hours of independent study each term (no more than 10 per year). Registration for each course should be in accordance with the level of instruction. Independent study projects must be approved by the instructor and the department chair or program director.

340: This course is extended independent study and/or internship. It can be worth up to 20 hours of credit depending on the agreement between student and instructor. All extended independent studies must be approved by the instructor, department chair and dean.

199, 299, 399, 499/599 and 699: These numbers are used for workshops or similar offerings. Workshops must go through an approval process each year. Some departments/programs utilize workshop numbers ending in 97, 98 or 99 based upon volume and frequency of workshop offerings.

677: This course is used for departments/programs without an established Independent Study course number. You can register for 1-5 credit hours of independent study each semester (no more than 10 per year). Registration for each course is in accordance with the level of instruction. Independent study projects must be approved by the instructor and the department chair/program director.

700: This number is used for Master's thesis research credit.

790: This number is used for Pre-candidacy doctoral research.

850: This number is used for Doctoral Dissertation credit.

Assigning a Course Number

Course numbers are assigned by the University Registrar using the guidelines described in the previous section.

Deleting Courses

By January 1 of each academic year, the Office of the Registrar will notify via an electronic report the appropriate chair or director and dean of any courses, with cross-listing notations, that have not been offered for the past three and one-half years.  No action will be taken on these courses at this point in time.  If the courses on this list are not offered by the following January 1, at the four and one-half years mark, they will be removed from the Bulletin listing of courses.  By March 1 of this fifth year, the chair or director with the approval of the appropriate academic dean may notify the Office of the Registrar of a decision to retain the course on the list of active University courses for one additional year. The course will remain active for an additional (sixth) year and be deleted during the following year, if not offered. Failure to supply such notification by March 1 of the fifth year of a course not being offered will result in the deletion of the course from the Bulletin list of active University courses. A department or program wishing to offer a course that has been deleted must follow the procedures for approval of a new course before the course may be offered again.

 

Faculty and Instructional Staff

Criteria for Quality[CS2] 

The following are the minimum expectations that apply to all full-time and part-time instructors at Miami University, including graduate teaching assistants or adjunct faculty members employed at secondary institution:

  • Faculty members hold a degree from a regionally or nationally accredited institution recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or the Council for Higher Education Accreditation or equivalent as verified by a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services;
  • Faculty members hold a terminal degree or a degree at least one level above the degree level in which they are teaching
    • At least a bachelor’s degree if teaching in an associate degree program,
    • At least a master’s degree if teaching in a bachelor’s degree program,
    • A terminal degree if teaching in a graduate program;
    • Faculty members teaching Miami Plan courses hold a master’s degree in the discipline taught or a master’s degree and a cohesive set of graduate coursework and graduate experiences equivalent to a graduate degree in the discipline;
    • Graduate teaching assistants who do not meet minimum faculty credentialing requirements are appropriately mentored by a faculty member of record who does meet the minimum credentialing requirements;
    • In addition to meeting degree level requirements, faculty members teaching technically or practice-oriented courses demonstrate evidence of practical experience in the field and hold applicable licenses and/or certifications;
    • For programs involving clinical faculty (e.g., student teaching supervisors, clinical practicum supervisors), the credentials and involvement of clinical faculty are described and meet applicable professional standards for the delivery of the educational experiences;
    • Where professional accreditation standards for faculty members exceed these standards, faculty members are expected to meet the professional accreditation standards;
    • Faculty members show evidence of professional development in the discipline;
    • Faculty members who teach online courses are appropriately prepared for teaching in an online environment;
    • Faculty members who received their degrees from a single institution do not constitute the majority of the program’s faculty. 

Use of Undergraduates as Teachers

Undergraduate Associates Program

Undergraduates may be used to assist in the instruction of undergraduates so long as the high quality of instruction that undergraduates at Miami expect and deserve is maintained.  Students who wish to perform in this capacity may apply for the Undergraduate Associates Program, which is University-wide, administered by the University Honors Program, and approved by the relevant department chair or program director (when appropriate). Requirements and regulations are described in detail in MUPIM 10.5 and summarized below:

  1. Ordinarily an Undergraduate Associate (UA) will serve as a junior assistant for instruction in a specific course or as a research assistant for a faculty member’s project. Faculty may also suggest other creative ways that a student can serve as an Undergraduate Associate.
  2. Faculty may nominate seniors, juniors, or sophomores to serve as Undergraduate Associates under his or her supervision for a term. The nominated undergraduates must be in good academic standing (i.e., attained a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or higher);
  3. All portions of the application form must be completed by the nominated student and/or the faculty nominator. The application should include:
    1. a statement describing the objectives and anticipated outcomes of the experience for the student and the relation of this experience to the student’s learning;
    2. an explanation of the roles and responsibilities of the student and faculty member;
    3. a rationale for the student’s readiness for this responsibility (including past coursework, experiences, and personal attributes) and the plan for preparing the student to assume the required responsibilities;
    4. a statement from the faculty member explaining the educational value of the use of the Undergraduate Associate, not only to the student but also to the faculty member and the students enrolled in the course; and
    5. a plan for assessing whether the use of the Undergraduate Associate advanced learning and the course objectives.
    6. No student may serve as an Undergraduate Associate in a course in which that student is currently enrolled.
    7. A student serving as an Undergraduate Associate in a course is responsible for acquiring an adequate knowledge of all relevant course materials.
    8. A student participating in the Undergraduate Associates Program may teach a very limited number of class sessions. When an Undergraduate Associate teaches all or part of a class session, the Associate's faculty sponsor will be present.
    9. In discharging his or her duties as an Undergraduate Associate, a student will not have sole responsibility for grading any assignment or instructing a specific class without supervision. An Undergraduate Associate may read other students’ assignments and examinations, write comments on them, and advise the faculty member about the grades.
    10. An Undergraduate Associate is expected to work a minimum of thirty (30) hours per semester.
    11. The faculty sponsor and the Undergraduate Associate should meet at least monthly and more often as desired and useful.
    12. At the conclusion of the undergraduate associateship, the student shall submit to the University Honors Program office a final reflection of what was learned by the undergraduate associateship experience. The reflection should be submitted on the appropriate form obtained from the University Honors Program office and should include but not be limited to:
      1. a commentary on how the use of the undergraduate associateship advanced learning on the part of the Undergraduate Associate, the faculty sponsor, and students in the class;
      2. a description of the Undergraduate Associate’s and faculty sponsor’s roles within the undergraduate associateship and the outcomes achieved;
      3. an explanation of the ways, if any, the roles, responsibilities, and outcomes differed from the original objectives and why;
      4. a reflection on how the undergraduate associateship experience advanced the Undergraduate Associate’s learning.
      5. Upon acceptance of the Undergraduate Associate’s final reflection, the University Honors Program office shall notify the Office of the Registrar to award the student an appropriate transcript notation. A student may receive one credit hour through independent study in the appropriate department or program for his or her participation in the Undergraduate Associates Program. The final grade will be determined by the faculty sponsor on the basis of the student’s work and on the quality of the student’s final reflection. A student may not receive pay for this experience.

 

Undergraduates Assisting in Laboratory Classes and Drill Sessions

With the approval of the department chair or program director (when appropriate), faculty members may hire undergraduates to assist in laboratory classes and drill sessions. The students shall not present new material or answer questions that go beyond the material presented by faculty members. The department or program shall determine the methods for selection, training, supervision, and evaluation of students. Students assisting in laboratory classes and drill sessions shall be paid but cannot receive academic credit for their work.

Grading by Undergraduate Students

With the approval of the department chair or program director (when appropriate), faculty members may hire undergraduates to score work by other students when the scoring is completely mechanical, as with multiple choice tests. The faculty member, not the student, assigns the actual grades. Undergraduates cannot be hired to grade final examinations or any quizzes, tests, or assignments where grading requires a qualitative evaluation. However, homework (problem) assignments may be graded by undergraduates provided the faculty member is responsible for the course grade and is available to respond to a student’s appeal of a grade given on a homework (problem) assignment. The department or program shall determine the methods for selection, training, supervision, and evaluation of students. Students hired to grade the work of students shall be paid but cannot receive academic credit for their work.

See MUPIM 10.5.

Grades and Grading Options

Grades

Grades for all students are reported to the Office of the Registrar. Grade submission deadlines and dates by which grades are viewable are listed on the academic calendar (http://www.units.muohio.edu/reg/calendars/). Miami uses the following grading structure on a 4.00 scale.

 

 

Points Per

Grade

 

Semester Hour

A+

 

4.00

A

Excellent

4.00

A-

 

3.70

B+

 

3.30

B

Good

3.00

B-

 

2.70

C+

 

2.30

C

Satisfactory

2.00

C-

 

1.70

D+

 

1.30

D

Poor

1.00

D-

 

0.70

F

Failure

0.00

Other grade symbols include:

I

=

Incomplete; calculates as an F in grade point average (retired).

IG or IGY

=

Incomplete; work at the graduate level; not included in the calculation of grade point average. The student has one academic semester following the recording to complete the academic work. Check the Academic Calendar for the deadlines per term. After the deadline has passed with no grade change being recorded, the "IG" will convert to a grade of F. The "IGY" will convert to Y (no credit).

IU or IUY

=

Incomplete work at the undergraduate level; not included in the calculation of grade point average. The student has one academic semester following the recording to complete the academic work. Check the Academic Calendar for the deadlines per term. After the deadline has passed with no grade change being recorded, the "IU" will convert to a grade of F. The "IUY" will convert to Y (no credit).

L

=

Audit; not included in enrollment status hours; not included in calculation of grade point average.

N

=

No grade submitted by the instructor; not included in the calculation of grade point average.

P

=

Passing; carries no credit points (used for student teaching, thesis hours, dissertation hours).

S

=

Satisfactory progress; carries no credit points and not included in the calculation of grade point average; (used for courses in research, independent reading, special topics courses, thesis hours, dissertation hours, and undergraduate honors); changes to a final grade when the project is completed.

U

=

Unsatisfactory progress; carries no credit points; not included in the calculation of grade point average; (also used for special projects as above); changes to a final grade when the project is completed.

W

=

Withdrawal; assigned to a student who officially withdraws from the University or from a course; carries no credit points; is not included in the calculation of grade point average.

WP

=

Withdrawal passing; (retired).

WF

=

Withdrawal failing; (retired).

X

=

Credit in a course taken credit/no-credit in which a grade of C or better is earned in an undergraduate course or in which a grade of B is earned in a graduate course; carries no credit points; not included in the calculation of grade point average.

Y

=

No credit in a course taken credit/no-credit course in which a grade of C- or less is earned in an undergraduate course or in which a B- or less was earned in a graduate course; carries no credit points; not included in the calculation of grade point average.

Z

=

Course grades preceded by Z indicate the Fresh Start policy has been applied.

Credit/No Credit

All students not on academic probation may register for courses on a credit/no-credit basis, except as noted below. Eligible students may enroll in any course on a credit/no-credit basis excepting courses used to meet department field of concentration and major requirements and the core courses at the Dolibois European Center. However, departments may specify field of concentration and major requirements that can be met with "credit" in a specified course. Registration in a course on a credit/no-credit basis requires the permission of the instructor except in Miami Plan courses.

No more than 25 percent of the total hours earned at Miami may be earned in courses taken on a credit/no-credit basis. First-year students may register for courses on a credit/no-credit basis providing they are concurrently enrolled for 12 hours for grades. During the summer term, first-year students may register for courses on a credit/no-credit basis providing they are concurrently enrolled for four semester hours for grades. If at any time during the semester, a student drops below 12 hours for grades (four hours for the summer term), the credit/no-credit status will be removed. Courses offered only on a credit/no-credit basis are not factored in. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors may register for one or more courses per semester on a credit/no-credit basis. Students may not enroll on a credit/no-credit basis in any course in which they have previously earned credit. A student may not enroll for grade in any course for which they have received "credit" on a credit/no-credit basis. "Credit" (X) will be granted for grades of C or better; "no-credit" (Y) will be granted for grades of C- or less. The instructor will record the normal letter grade, which the Office of the Registrar will convert to the respective credit/no-credit symbol. Courses taken on a credit/no-credit basis are disregarded in the computation of grade point averages. A course can be changed from credit/no-credit to letter grade or from letter grade to credit/no-credit during the first 20 percent of the course (see the academic calendar for specific dates).

Incomplete Grades

If a student cannot finish the work for a course by the end of a term, with the instructor’s permission the student may take an incomplete. This is an agreement between the student and the instructor that the student will finish the remaining unfinished course work.

Grades of incomplete for a graduating student must be removed by the conclusion of end-of-term processing for the student's graduation term, approximately 30 days after the date of graduation.

A grade of Incomplete may be assigned only in cases where a formal arrangement has been made with the student for completion of the work.

For more information, see: Student Handbook 1.3; General Bulletin.

Non-Attendance

Any listed student who stopped attending or never attended and was not pre-assigned a W must be assigned a final grade for the course. If the student's work due to non-attendance or stopped attendance is insufficient to warrant credit for the course, a failing grade (F) must be submitted to prevent the student from receiving credit for the course.

Class Size

The maximum size of each class section is fixed by the department chair or program director with the approval of the dean of the appropriate academic division and Provost and is based on the optimum size for effective teaching and the capacity of available classrooms. After a section or course is closed, only the department chair or program director has the authority to add students to it, and only after he or she has first ascertained from the Office of the Registrar that a classroom is available.

See: MUPIM 10.2

Attendance and Absence of Students

Every student is expected to attend every class session for which the student is duly registered.

It is the prerogative of the individual faculty member to set attendance policy for each individual course, and it is the responsibility of the individual faculty member to inform students of that policy in the course syllabus or other written document within the first week of the semester.

There are no University-recognized excused absences except for religious observances that require absence from a class session and other required class activities. Students must give written notification to their instructor within the first two weeks of class of the religious event that prohibits class attendance and the date that will be missed, if officially known. Instructors will, without prejudice, provide such students with reasonable accommodations for completing missed work. However, students are ultimately responsible for material covered in class, regardless of whether the student is absent or present.

In general, class absence should be avoided unless absolutely necessary. If a student is involved in activities that result in class absence (such as intercollegiate athletics, band, debate, other class activities, etc.), it is the student’s responsibility to negotiate specific arrangements with individual instructors about any absences. The Senate also recognizes the fundamental value of extra- and co-curricular activities and their significance in students’ overall educational experience. Instructors should recognize that participation in such activities is an integral part of students’ education and helps to fulfill the comprehensive mission of the University. Therefore, instructors are urged to accommodate student requirements.

Whenever a student is absent from class to such an extent as to make the student’s work inefficient or to impair the morale of the class, the instructor may direct the Office of the Registrar to drop the student. During the first 20 percent of the course no grade will be recorded; after the first 20 percent is completed but before 60 percent of the course is completed, a grade of W will be recorded. After 60 percent of the course is completed, a grade of F will be recorded. The instructor shall notify the student of this action no later than the time he or she notifies the Office of the Registrar (see academic calendar for specific dates).

A department may, at its discretion, drop from a course any student who is absent from the first class meeting of a semester or term, unless by the end of the day (11:59 p.m.) of the first class meeting the student notifies the department or instructor of his or her intention to take the course. When possible, departments and instructors should reinstate a student who, for reasons beyond his or her control, was unable to contact the department or instructor by this deadline.

The determination of individual class attendance requirements and their enforcement at the Dolibois European Center is governed by the attendance policy of the Center.

For more information, see: MUPIM 10.1; Student Handbook 1.9; Bulletin.

Auditing Courses

Courses may be audited without credit with the consent of the instructor and will not be counted under any rules established by the instructor and may include active registration or enrollment status. The requirements for auditing a course are established by the instructor and may include active participation by the student. Any instructor may drop an auditing student at any time during the semester if the student is not fulfilling the audit requirements. Full fees are assessed for auditing a course. Whenever a student is not fulfilling the audit requirements for a course the instructor may direct the Office of the Registrar to drop the student. During the first 20 percent of the course no grade will be recorded; after the first 20 percent is completed but before 60 percent of the course is completed, a grade of W will be recorded.  See: MUPIM 10.6; Student Handbook 1.5.

Textbook Policy

The dissemination of timely, accurate, and complete information about required textbooks and supplemental materials is important to ensure that sufficient quantities of textbooks and supplemental materials are available to meet the needs of students and to assist students in being responsible consumers.

Before each upcoming academic term, the Office of the Provost shall partner with the University Bookstore to make publicly accessible the following information for each upcoming academic term:

  1. The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) and retail price information of required and recommended textbooks and supplemental materials for each course listed in the course schedule; and number of students enrolled in each course and the maximum student enrollment for the course.
  2. The Office of the Provost, in consultation with the University Bookstore, shall communicate to the deans, department chairs, program directors, and regional campus coordinators the date by which their textbook information is to be provided to the University Bookstore.

The textbook information provided to the University Bookstore shall be published on the University Bookstore website and shall be made readily accessible through a link from the University’s on-line course registration system.

If the ISBN is not available, then the author, title, publisher, and copyright date for such college textbook or supplemental material will be published. If the University Bookstore determines that the disclosure of the information required by this policy is not practicable for a college textbook or supplemental material, then it will place the designation ‘To Be Determined’ in lieu of the information required.

Use of Self-Authored Material

In the event that an instructor wishes to utilize a textbook(s) or other material which is authored by the instructor and the sale of which results in a royalty being paid to the instructor, then such textbook/material may only be required by the instructor if: (1) the instructor’s chair or program director and dean have consented to the use of the textbook/material; or (2) the majority of faculty within the instructor’s department has voted to permit the instructor’s use of the textbook/material in the instructor’s class. Sales of such items cannot be conducted directly between a faculty member and a student.

 Departmental Responsibilities

  1. The information referenced above will be made available by academic departments and programs each academic term to the University Bookstore on or before a date specified by the Office of the Provost. The academic departments and programs will endeavor to ensure that the information provided to the University Bookstore is in an acceptable format so as to avoid unnecessary orders and returns by the University Bookstore.
  2. Unless the academic department has made other arrangements, it is the responsibility of each individual instructor to secure his or her own desk copies of textbooks.
  3. Each academic department or program and regional campus coordinator should designate a person to act as its representative with the University Bookstore and should inform the Bookstore of the name of the designated person.
  4. To the extent possible, the University Bookstore should be notified of increased enrollments of scheduled course sections and/or of additional course sections to be offered.
  5. Following the submission to the University Bookstore of textbook lists for the upcoming academic term, instructors are expected to use the textbooks specified for that term.

For more information on textbooks, see MUPIM 10.4

Mid-Term Grades

Midterm grades provide students the opportunity to assess their academic performance while there is still time to improve before receiving official grades. Midterm grades are not recorded on student's academic records. Academic advisers have access to students' midterm grades, and they will meet with all students who are struggling to discuss strategies for improving academic performance.

Faculty members are required to submit midterm grades for the following undergraduate students:

  • New first-year students
  • Postsecondary A & B students
  • Continuing students who have earned less than 16 credit hours.

Midterm grades are available to first year students online through BannerWeb in mid-October. In the spring semester, midterm grades are issued only to continuing students who earned 16 or fewer credit hours in their previous semester(s).

Please see the appropriate Academic Calendar for grade submission dates.

To enter the midterm grades, locate the appropriate class in myMiami Home or Faculty tab, and click photo roster.  This roster will display a list of students in your class.  It includes a column to indicate whether you are required to submit midterm grades.  You may and are encouraged to submit midterm grades for additional students. Click the Midterm Grades link to open BannerWeb for grade entry.  Select a student and enter the grade using the drop-down list.  Click the Submit button at the bottom of the page to save your grade entries.

For any listed student who discontinued attendance or never attended, you are encouraged to drop the student from your class prior to the end of the ninth week of the term.  You may officially DROP the student by following the instructions in Dropping a student from a class.

Examinations

Final examinations are expected in all undergraduate courses unless other evaluative substitute procedures have been approved by the department chair or dean of the division. Final examinations or duly approved substitutions may be completed during the final examination week. Neither final examinations nor tests of fifty (50) minutes or of greater length shall be given during the seven (7) calendar days preceding the first study day of the final examination period. The above regulations do not apply to laboratory final examinations. No final examination, including a laboratory final examination, may be given during study days. Final examinations in accelerated or sprint courses that end with the last week of classes must be given during the final examination week. Exceptions to these rules require the approval of the department chair, academic dean, and the Provost.

Examination Schedule

The Office of the Registrar develops the final examination schedule for the Oxford campus.

The final examination schedule is available on the Office of the Registrar website.  Except for group examinations, final examinations are generally held in the room where the class regularly meets.

In order for classes to be eligible for a group final examination during one of the designated group examination time blocks, the following criteria must be met:

  • Three or four sections of the same course exist with a total enrollment of 200 or more students;
  • Five or more sections of the same course exist, regardless of their enrollment size.

Room assignments for group examinations are posted on the examination schedule approximately one month prior to the final examination week. 

Schedule Changes for Final Examinations or Other Evaluative Substitution

No student shall be required to take more than three (3) scheduled final examinations in any 24-hour period. If a student has four (4) or more final examinations in any 24-hour period, then one of those examinations may be changed to a later time with the consent of the instructor, or to an earlier time with the consent of both the instructor and the dean of the academic division in which the course is given. In cases where a student is scheduled for four (4) or more final examinations in any 24-hour period and no agreement as stated above can be reached, the Provost shall be empowered to make necessary adjustments.

An individual student’s final examination may not otherwise be rescheduled except in extraordinary circumstances beyond the student’s control, in which case an attempt should be made to reschedule the examination at a later time rather than an earlier time if possible. Rescheduling an examination in such cases to a later time requires the consent of the instructor; advancing to an earlier time requires the consent of the instructor, the department chair/program director, and the dean of the academic division in which the course is given.

During final examinations week, an instructor may not reschedule a regularly scheduled class examination except in extraordinary circumstances, in which case an attempt should be made to reschedule the examination at a later time rather than an earlier time if possible. Rescheduling any class final examination requires the instructor to obtain the consent of the department chair/program director and the dean of the academic division in which the course is given.

To request a change in final examination time, complete the appropriate form  which is available on the Office of Registrar website.  This form must include a signature from the appropriate department chair/program director and academic dean.

Examinations and Additional Class Requirements during the Semester

Examinations and additional class requirements given other than during scheduled class meetings and the final examination periods do not take precedence over regularly scheduled classes or final examinations.

In order that students might avoid scheduling conflicts, such examinations and additional class requirements should be scheduled on a course management system prior to the beginning of a semester. If it becomes necessary during the semester to hold an examination or class requirement other than during the scheduled class meeting, the instructor should search for a time which does not conflict with other scheduled courses in which any of his or her students are enrolled. For students whose participation in regularly scheduled classes precludes attendance at the additional examination or class requirement time, it is the responsibility of the instructor requiring the examination and/or additional class requirement to provide an alternative meeting time.

Preparation of Examinations

Examinations should not be repeated from year to year in identical form. No undergraduate student shall be employed to type or reproduce any examination questions. After an examination has been reproduced, the instructor must make sure that the reproduction office has returned all copies and other evidence.

Administering Examinations

Whenever there is congestion in a classroom during hour examinations, the chair of the department should, if possible, assign more than one proctor. Whenever feasible each student should be seated so that vacant chairs surround him or her or alternate examinations should be given to students sitting side by side. Whenever possible, the Office of the Registrar will assign larger rooms upon request.

Proctoring of Examinations

Every test, quiz, and examination shall be carefully proctored. A proctor may consider it his or her right to require students to deposit all textbooks, notebooks, and loose paper of any sort in the front of the room whenever the full period is devoted to a test.

See MUPIM 10.3; Student Handbook 1.4.

Pre-Requisites and Co-Requisites

The following restrictions may be placed on Miami courses:

  • Prerequisites are approximations of the necessary specific or general academic knowledge, background, or semester classification required to succeed academically in a specific course.
  • Co-requisites indicate the courses required to be taken in the same semester as the course in question.

All sections of a given course must carry the same prerequisite and/or co-requisite enrollment restrictions.  The curriculum approval process must be used to add or change a prerequisite and co-requisite enrollment restriction for a given course.  Prerequisite and co-requisite enrollment restrictions that are required by the Ohio Board of Regents for transfer assurance may not be removed or altered.

The above listed restrictions should not be confused with “recommended preparation” specifications.  “Recommended preparation” indicates course work or specific background that is advisable but not mandatory in preparing students for a designated course.  The “recommended preparation” guidelines are determined by the instructor and not incorporated into the registration system.

Course Changes

Guidelines for Submission of a Course Change

A proposal for revisions of an existing course shall first be approved by the department or program, after consultation with other departments or programs where appropriate. These course changes must be submitted to the division for approval. Upon approval by the division, these course changes will appear on the University Senate Consent Calendar and become official at the close of the Senate meeting in which the course change is received. Divisions are responsible for reviewing all Senate consent calendar items prior to the University Senate meeting.

Significant Course Changes

The following revisions to an existing course are considered significant:

  • change in student learning outcomes or other significant course content change;
  • any change in credit hours;
  • permanently deleting a course (see also “Deleting a Course”).

Significant course changes must be submitted for approval by the following bodies.

Approving Body

Undergraduate

Graduate

Department or Program

*

*

Division

*

*

Council of Academic Deans

*

*

University Senate

*

*

 

See MUPIM 11.1.B.

Procedure for Deletion of Courses from List of Courses

By January 1 of each academic year, the Office of the Registrar will notify via an electronic report the appropriate chair or director and dean of any courses that have not been offered for the past three and one-half years.   No action will be taken on these courses at this point in time.  If the courses on this list are not offered by the following January 1, at the four and one-half years mark, they will be removed from the Bulletin listing of courses.  By March 1 of this fifth year, the chair or director with the approval of the appropriate academic dean may submit to the Office of the Registrar a written justification for retaining the course on the list of active University courses for one additional year. The course will remain active for an additional (sixth) year and be deleted during the following year, if not offered.  Failure to supply such justification by March 1 of the fifth year of a course not being offered will result in the deletion of the course from the Bulletin list of active University courses. A department or program wishing to offer a course that has been deleted must follow the procedures for approval of a new course before the course may be offered again.

See MUPIM 11.1.D.

Course Scheduling

Guidelines for Course Scheduling

The primary objective of class scheduling is student access to required classes by optimizing space utilization throughout the week. Equally critical is a scheduling plan so faculty can remain vibrant, current, and active in their research pursuits.

Toward these ends, the following guidelines are used by the University for scheduling:

  • Spread utilization throughout the week and across all times of the day;
  • Match section enrollment to room capacity;
  • Utilize standard timeblock meeting patterns;
  • Match faculty needs with classroom technology.

Scheduling Policies

  1. 1.       Timeblock Adherence:  Miami University classes should meet in an approved scheduling timeblock based upon the “Standard Timeblock Model.” The timeblock form and a template for developing a departmental schedule are available on the Office of the Registrar website.
  2. 2.       Spread of Classes across Timeblocks. Departments must distribute full term and sprint classes utilizing all timeblocks throughout the day as much as possible without reusing previously scheduled day timeblocks.
  3. 3.       Final Examination Week. Please confer the section on Examinations in this manual as well as the Office of the Registrar website for final exam week information including Group Exam guidelines, moving exam times, and student exam time conflicts.  All Miami campuses utilize the same final exam grid.
  4. Approving the Class Schedule. Approval rests with each division throughout all steps of the process, including after each term’s schedule has been developed and registration has begun. Consult the appropriate division for specific guidelines.
  5. Coordinating Offerings. Departments should consult with one another and across divisions to coordinate the scheduling of classes shared between and among various student majors. A “Common Courses Report” serves as a reference document and is available upon request from the Office of the Registrar.
  6. Reports. Various reports will be generated by the Office of the Registrar to provide data regarding issues - such as the spread of classes across days – and distributed to the departments, divisions, and Provost throughout the process in support of the Miami University Class Scheduling Policy – Oxford Campus.

General Procedures

Scheduling Process

All course requests and changes must be made to the registration offices via email from the departmental secretary or scheduling coordinator, with the approval of the division. The process includes term scheduling and registration timelines which outline dates and deadlines for schedule development and registration deadlines based upon approved timeblocks and part of term (sprint) dates.

All course changes must be requested to the Office of the Registrar via email from the departmental secretary or scheduling coordinator.

Room Scheduling

Academic classroom room scheduling, which is a unit in the Office of the Registrar handles the scheduling of all rooms across the University for classes, examinations, final examinations, review sessions, workshops, orientation, meetings, conferences, and special events. Records and registration offices on the regional campuses schedules those locations.

For scheduling of courses, please review the guidelines for scheduling in this manual. 

Room requests are made online on the Office of Registrar’s website.  Emergency and same day requests must also be requested via the online room request form.  



[1] Note: This policy only applies to faculty members who have not previously taught a given course with a prefix from another division.  It does not apply to courses that have already been taught by current faculty housed in another division.  For example, a regional faculty member who has taught COM 135 on the regional campuses for many years does not need to undergo the course-specific meeting or syllabi review.