Monroe Courses

Monday Classes

The Works of Zora Neale Hurston

Widely regarded as a formative influence on contemporary authors such as Toni Morrison and Alice Walker, Zora Neale Hurston’s work was met with criticism during her lifetime. Rediscovered, in part due to the efforts of Alice Walker, we now have another work from Zora Neale Hurston: a book that demonstrates her skill as an anthropologist and an ethnographer. In Barracoon, Zora Neale Hurston tells the story of Cudjo Lewis, who was regarded as the last living person brought from Africa on a slave ship. We’ll read both her best-known work, Their Eyes Were Watching God, as well as this new publication.

Class texts: Barracoon: The Story of the Last Black Cargo, by Zora Neale Hurston, Amistad, 2018, ISBN-10: 0062748203, ISBN-13: 978- 0062748201. Their Eyes Were Watching God, by Zora Neale Hurston, Harper Perennial Modern Classics, 2006, ISBN-10: 0061120065, ISBN-13: 978-0061120060.

Instructors

Marianne Cotugno is an Associate Professor of English who loves offering ILR classes.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 1–October 29; 10:45am–12pm

Location: Chapel, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village


Energy Development as a Consumer and Community Stakeholder

Energy consumers want to know how development projects will impact their homes and neighbors. Course participants will explore working with utilities, energy service providers, regulators, local governments, and community organizations to determine how energy development can best provide consumer benefits as well as long term community development.

Instructor

Dale Arnold, Director of Energy Services for the Ohio Farm Bureau Federation, has over 25 years of experience managing education, community outreach, and technical assistance projects on energy generation, transmission, and distribution.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 1–October 29; 1:00–2:15pm

Location: Chapel, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village


Celebrating Tea Culture

Travel around the world with us as we explore the experiences of tea from its origins in China, through its introduction to Europe, across Africa and the rest of Asia, and finally to the United States. Each week we will try tea and food that represent the part of the world where we are traveling, and we will see many of the ways that tea has affected people and customs. Our classes will be enhanced with commentary from Ruthanna Jeter and Lois Philips.

Instructor

Susan Schechter, owner of The Tea Parlor for 12 years, serves an English style tea three days a week.

Dates and Location

5 Mondays: October 1–October 29; 2:45–4:00pm

Location: Multipurpose Room, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village

Fee: $12.00, payable on the first day of class

Wednesday Classes

From Communism to America, a Family History

October 3Our Path from Communist East Germany to America

October 10Dr. W. Linse–Instructor’s uncle, anti-Nazi, executed in Moscow for spying and anti-communist propaganda.

October 17Ongoing Controversy about Linse’s Role Under the Nazis–The subject of Peter’s own research.

Instructor

Peter Seifert, a retired engineer, immigrated from East Germany to the West and later to the United States in 1964. A resident of Middletown since 1967, he is interested in history (USA and Germany) and hiking.

Dates and Location

Wednesdays: October 3–October 17; 1:00–2:15pm

Location: Activity Building, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village


ILR Foodies: Mixing Together Good Food and Companionship

Our interactive and lively series is designed to focus on Culinary Entertaining, the times you gather with friends, neighbors, and family. These celebrations call for food that is fun and healthy, from both familiar and new styles of cooking. Teaching about how food brings people together is one of Chef Eric’s great joys.

Instructor

Eric Yung is a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America. He worked in Michelin starred restaurants in Santa Fe, Maine, and New York City. Most recently he served as an Executive Chef and Director of Catering at Miami University.

Dates and Location

5 Wednesdays: October 3–October 31; 3:00–4:15pm

Location: Activity Building, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village

Thursday Classes

Hands-on with Google Photos

See how effortlessly your lifetime of photos can be backed up, organized, easily accessed, and then shared using Google Photos from any authorized device connected to the internet. It’s fabulous, it’s free, and it’s fun. NOTE: Students will need a Google/Gmail account and password and should bring a laptop, tablet, and/ or smartphone to class for hands-on experience using Google Photos.

Instructor

Robin Seaver spent her half-century career teaching basic computer skills from mainframe computers to today’s smartphones and tablets.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 4–November 1; 9:00–10:15am

Location: Chapel, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village


Atomic Energy Mission at Mound Laboratory

Mound Laboratory was begun by the U.S. Army’s Manhattan Project to develop and produce the neutron initiator for the atomic bomb that ended World War II in Japan in 1945. This course will provide the Mound History, describe materials used, technologies developed, and subsequent missions including heat sources produced for space missions.

October 4–The History of Mound Laboratory–Robert Bowman was employed at Mound starting in 1969 until leaving as a Science Fellow in 1984, followed by positions at three aerospace organizations and Oak Ridge National Lab.

October 11–Weapons Component Testing, Fusion, and Stable Isotopes Enrichment–Robert Ellefson was a researcher at Mound beginning in 1972 until he retired in 1994 as a science fellow. He was then employed designing and building mass spectrometers and worked on fuel cell testing and tritium measurement. He is a consultant with the Department of Energy.

October 18–Mound’s Role in Space Exploration–Doug Gabriel was a program manager in the Heat Source program.

October 25–The Life and Death of Cassini–Joe Childers has been an Astronomy Educator at the Boonshoft Museum of Discovery in Dayton for ten years and is an Adjunct Professor of Physics at Wright State University.

November 1–Nuclear Electricity Batteries and Homicide–Carl Bishop was a chemist at Mound for 29 years. He also taught chemistry and math at Miami in Hamilton.

Coordinator

Dave Balsmeyer was a Construction Project Manager at Mound from 1965–1994.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 4–November 1; 10:45am–12pm

Location: Chapel, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village


Afternoon Lectures

The Afternoon Lectures offer an opportunity to hear about the experiences of interesting people through their incredible stories. Some folks just seem to know a lot about some very amazing things!

October 4Titanium: the Newest “Wonder” Metal–Stan Seagle has been involved with the metal titanium since the 1950s when it was first industrialized. He retired from RTI International as VP of Technology.

October 11Working the Wet Side–Pat Lunsford is a retired teacher, coach, and athletic director; he officiates at international swimming competitions and has officiated at two Olympics.

October 18The Making of Shenandoah National Park–Bill Deitzer headed for the trails after his career as a chief financial officer. He now shares his enthusiasm, history, and knowledge of the U.S. National Parks with audiences near and far.

October 25The Miracle of the North Platte Canteen–Rosemary Deitzer loves to share stories about towns and ordinary people who do extraordinary things, providing fodder for inspiring and intriguing lectures.

November 1A Trip to Cuba–Mary Ellen Haynes is a retired music teacher who has traveled extensively in South America, Africa, and Europe with her husband, Bill.

Coordinator

Lois Philips is a retired Miami University administrator who enjoys ILR activities.

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 4–November 1; 1:00–2:15pm

Location: Chapel, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village


Parables Unique to Luke’s Gospel

Each of the first three Gospels has its own “spin” on the wonderful stories Jesus told. Luke left out some of these stories to make room for other parables, unique to his telling of the Good News about Jesus. We will give special attention to the so-called Travel Narrative (Luke 9:51-19:48), beginning with some general principles of interpretation and how to use cultural and literary analysis. Bring a modern translation of the Christian Bible (e.g., NRSV) and hopes of learning a fresh approach to an old, old story.

Class text: A modern translation of the Christian Bible.

Instructor

Charlene McAfee Moss most recently taught at Ashland Theological Seminary

Dates and Location

5 Thursdays: October 4 – November 1; 2:45–4:00pm

Location: Chapel, Mt. Pleasant Retirement Village

ILR events/classes involving walking/hiking/exercise may be strenuous for some. Please use discretion when registering.