Tri Delt Sundial

Trademark

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office indicates that a trademark is a word, phrase, symbol or design, or a combination of words, phrases, symbols or designs, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others. Similarly, a service mark is the same as a trademark, except that it identifies and distinguishes the source of a service rather than a product. 

In describing a trademark, Black's Law Dictionary reads: "[t]he main purpose of a trademark is to guarantee a product’s genuineness. In effect, the trademark is the commercial substitute for one’s signature." 

The University uses numerous trademarks to represent the University. For example, the RedHawk logo and the Lantern logo are two of the most commonly used trademarks. However, a trademark is not necessarily just a symbol; it can also be certain words. The University also has numerous word trademarks, including, for example, the words "Miami University," "Miami University RedHawks," and "Cradle of Coaches."

The University licenses its trademarks to certain third-parties for the production and sale of  goods and services (e.g., sweatshirts, school supplies, sporting equipment, video games, etc.). In exchange, the University receives license fees based upon the sale of these goods and services. These license fees are used to support University scholarships.

The University aggressively protects its trademarks against infringement. The University regularly sends cease and desist letters to parties that are using the University's marks without permission. Moreover, when necessary, the University has brought lawsuits and seized the goods of infringing parties.

The licensing of the University's trademarks is handled through the Office of University Communications and Marketing. 

For More Information

For further information regarding trademarks and the University's licensing procedures, visit the sites below: