Alcohol, Drug, and Substance Abuse Policies

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The following information is provided in response to the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989 (Public Law 101-226), which require that the university show that it has adopted and implemented a program to prevent the illicit use of drugs and the abuse of alcohol by students and employees. The university must certify that it is in compliance with this law in order to receive any Federal funds. The law requires, in part, the annual distribution of the following descriptive statements to each university student and employee. There is no distinction between full-time and part-time or permanent and temporary students and employees.

The unlawful possession, use, consumption or distribution of drugs and/or alcohol by students or employees on university property or as a part of any university activity is prohibited. Violators will be prosecuted in accordance with applicable laws and ordinances and will be subject as well to disciplinary actions by the university, in conformance with the Miami University Information and Policy Manual and/or sections 2.1.E, 2.1.F, 2.2.E, and 4.4 of The Student Handbook included in the sections below. Sanctions for violations may include suspension, and/or termination/dismissal, as well as compulsory attendance at drug/alcohol education programs or other appropriate disciplinary measures.


For Students

Despite the fact that alcohol use is illegal for most college undergraduates, alcohol continues to be widely used on and around most college campuses today. Miami is no exception. Miami's growing concern about the use and abuse of alcohol led to the adoption of mandatory penalties for alcohol violations.

Legal and Responsible Use of Alcohol

The right to acquire, possess, and consume alcoholic beverages is limited by laws that establish minimum drinking ages, drinking and driving laws, and so on. Miami University also has established policies on alcohol use on campus and by campus groups. It is incumbent on students, faculty, and staff to become knowledgeable regarding these policies, whether for individual decision-making or for planning programs and events for a department or organization, including student organizations.

All on-campus possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages must be conducted in accordance with Ohio law regarding the possession, sale, and consumption of alcohol. Specifically:

  1. Individuals under the age of 21 may not purchase, possess, or consume beer, wine, or intoxicating liquor. It is also against the law for any person to furnish beer, wine, or intoxicating liquor to any person under 21 years of age.
  2. No person shall have in his or her possession any open container of beer, wine, or intoxicating liquor in any public place except where the alcoholic beverage has been lawfully purchased for consumption on the premises of the holder of the appropriate permit from the State Department of Liquor Control.

The Vice President for Finance and Business Services and Treasurer has the primary responsibility for approval, implementation, and interpretation of University alcohol policy. The University Police have primary responsibility for on-campus enforcement of Ohio law and State Department of Liquor Control regulations regarding alcoholic beverages.

Alcoholic beverages may be served on campus only to those 21 years of age or older at a private gathering of invited guests at an approved University facility. A private reception, dinner, or other gathering where food and alcoholic beverages are served, without cost, to invited guests does not require a liquor permit. The sponsoring department or organization must implement measures to ensure that only invited guests age 21 or older are eligible to be served alcoholic beverages, that only invited guests will be admitted, and that no fee or charge will be assessed. Alcoholic beverages shall not be served to any person who is under the age of 21 or to any person who appears to be intoxicated. Non-alcoholic beverages and food must also be provided.

Approved facilities include seminar rooms and lounges in University academic buildings. These seminar rooms and lounges may be scheduled with the designated scheduling authority of the individual building. If alcoholic beverages are to be served, the designated scheduling authority must be so informed at the time of scheduling. The designated scheduling authorities for the most commonly used facilities are indicated in parentheses:

  1. Armstrong Student Center (Director of the Armstrong Student Center)
  2. The Marcum Hotel & Conference Center (Director of Conference & Hospitality Services)
  3. Shriver Center (Senior Director of Shriver Center)
  4. Murstein Alumni Center (Vice President for University Advancement)
  5. Seminar rooms and lounges in academic buildings (department chair or dean)

Whenever a designated scheduling authority of an academic building approves a gathering at which alcoholic beverages will be served, the designated scheduling authority must simultaneously notify, in writing, the Vice President for Finance and Business Services and Treasurer of the approval.

Special events are gatherings at which an admission fee will be charged and alcoholic beverages will be served or gatherings at which alcoholic beverages will be sold. Special Events also include those gatherings that will be held in a facility that has not been approved for events serving alcoholic beverages. All Special Events must have a liquor permit from the Ohio Department of Liquor Control. They must also have the express written permission of the Vice President for Finance and Business Services and Treasurer. The request must be made in writing and include the date, time, location, and purpose of the event as well as the reason for requesting that alcoholic beverages be available, whether an admission fee will be charged, or whether alcoholic beverages will be sold. Permission is at the discretion of the Vice President for Finance and Business Services and Treasurer and will be granted only in accordance with law, Department of Liquor Control regulations, and University policy. The Marcum Hotel & Conference Center and Shriver Center have permanent liquor permits, and gatherings held at either facility are exempt from this policy.

No person may enter the property of Miami University for the commercial delivery of alcohol to any person at an on-campus student residential facility or to any student who resides in an on-campus residential facility. Alcohol may not be delivered to, possessed, consumed, or served in any residence hall housing first-year students. Each academic year, the Vice President for Student Affairs shall designate which residence halls will serve as first-year residence halls.

The Student Code of Conduct

Intoxication (105A)

 Intoxication or exhibiting negative behavior associated with intoxication after using alcohol is prohibited.

Prohibited Use of Alcohol (105B)

Underage possession, consumption, consumption in unauthorized locations, or furnishing of alcoholic beverages to any person under legal age to consume alcohol is prohibited.

Note: Because of Miami University’s commitment to the responsible consumption of alcohol, mandatory minimum penalties will be imposed upon a finding of a violation of this policy.

The University will notify by email or regular U.S. mail the parents of students under the age of 21 who have been found responsible for violating the Code of Student Conduct regarding the use or possession of alcohol or drugs.

A student who after having a hearing for a violation of Section 2.1.E.1, Intoxication, is found not responsible, may be found responsible for a violation of Section 2.1.E.2, Prohibited Use of Alcohol. See Section 2.2.E for penalties (see Part 4, Chapter 4 of the Student Handbook for the Policy on Alcohol Use).

A student who after having a hearing for a violation of Section 2.1.E.2, Prohibited Use of Alcohol, is found not responsible may be found responsible for a violation of Section 2.1.N, Complicity.

Sanctions

Sanctions may be imposed singly or in combination on individuals, student organizations, and fraternities or sororities. A student may be suspended or dismissed for a single violation. Multiple violations or additional violations of the Code of Student Conduct may result in more severe sanctions.

No sanction will be imposed until all appeals are completed (see Chapter 4 Appeals). Failure to complete a sanction will result in a hold on the student’s ability to register for subsequent semesters or additional disciplinary sanctions. Student organizations and fraternities and sororities will not be reinstated until all sanctions are completed.

Students should be aware that disciplinary records may be reviewed by others within the University and may have adverse consequences for those seeking the second-year residency exemption and/or enrollment in study-abroad opportunities.

Penalties for Alcohol Violations

Intoxication or Negative Behavior Involving the Use of Alcohol

Any student who is intoxicated or exhibits negative behavior after using alcohol is in violation of this policy.

Minimum Penalties:

Minimum Penalties:

  1. First Offense. The minimum penalty for a first offense is mandatory attendance at a four-hour substance abuse education program and a minimum fee of $200 to the student for the program as well as mandatory participation in a comprehensive substance abuse assessment and a minimum fee of $250 to the student for the assessment. Further intervention and an opportunity to participate in group sessions may be recommended by the counselor. There will be no additional fee to the student for participation in the group sessions at the Student Counseling Service.
  2. Second Offense. Suspension from the University, either immediately or at the close of the current semester/term, for a minimum of either fall or spring semester and may also include summer and/or winter term. (Note that a student may not be suspended solely for either summer and/ or winter )

If a student is suspended as a result of alcohol violations and subsequently returns to Miami University, another violation of the alcohol policy may result in dismissal.

Registration for subsequent semesters will be withheld until the student complies with the penalties assessed for the first offense. If a student has been officially found to have committed an alcohol offense and two calendar years have elapsed without a subsequent finding for such an offense, a prior offense will be considered in determining the current penalty but the minimum penalty is not mandatory. For multiple violations of the Student Conduct Regulations, additional penalties may be warranted and imposed in accordance with normal University disciplinary procedures.

Good Samaritan Policy – In the event the student incurs an alcohol violation during the twelve-month period following the Good Samaritan report, the prior file may be reviewed as part of the sanctioning process but will not be counted as a prior alcohol offense for the purpose of imposing mandatory minimum sanctions.

Prohibited Use of Alcohol

Minimum Penalties:

  1. First Offense. The minimum penalty for a first offense is required attendance at a two-hour substance abuse program designed to acquaint students with their civil and legal responsibilities as well as the personal and career implications of alcohol and other substance abuse. There will be a minimum fee of $150 to the student for the program.
  2. Second Offense. The minimum penalty for a second offense is mandatory participation in a comprehensive substance abuse assessment and a minimum fee of $250 to the student for the assessment. Further intervention and an opportunity to participate in group sessions may be recommended by the counselor. There will be no additional fee to the student for participation in the group sessions at the Student Counseling Service.
  3. Third Offense. Suspension from the University, either immediately or at the close of the current semester/term, for a minimum of either fall or spring semester and may also include summer and/or winter term. (Note that a student may not be suspended solely for either summer and/ or winter )

If a student is suspended as a result of alcohol violations and subsequently returns to Miami University, another violation of the alcohol policy may result in dismissal.

Registration for subsequent semesters will be withheld until the student complies with the penalties assessed for the first or second offenses. If a student has been officially found to have committed an alcohol offense and two calendar years have elapsed without a subsequent finding for such an offense, a prior offense will be considered in determining the current penalty, but the minimum penalty is not mandatory. For multiple violations of the Student Conduct Regulations, additional penalties may be warranted and imposed in accordance with normal University disciplinary procedures.

Multiple Alcohol Violations Involving Prohibited Use of Alcohol and Intoxication

The minimum penalty for any combination of three alcohol violations is suspension from the University; either immediately or at the close of the semester/term for a minimum of either fall or spring semester and may also include summer and/or winter term. (Note that a student may not be suspended solely for either summer and/or winter )


Drug Use

Prohibited Use of Drugs (106A)

The use, offer for sale, sale, distribution, possession, or manufacture of any controlled substance or drug except as expressly permitted by law is prohibited. The use, offer for sale, sale, distribution, possession, or manufacture of chemicals, products, or materials for the purpose of use as an intoxicant except as expressly permitted by law is also prohibited.

Possession of Drug Paraphernalia (106B)

Possession of drug paraphernalia is also prohibited. Drug paraphernalia includes any equipment, product, or material of any kind that is used in propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, storing, containing, concealing, injecting, ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing into the human body a controlled substance.

A student who after having a hearing for a violation of either part of Section 2.1.F, Drug Use, is found not responsible may be found responsible for a violation of Section 2.1.N, Complicity.


Alcohol and Other Drug Education

Miami University encourages education as the first step in assisting students to take responsibility for their behavior and to understand the consequences of current and future behavior as it relates to drug and alcohol use.

Miami University requires all first-year students to participate in AlcoholEdu, an online educational program, prior to coming to campus. AlcoholEdu is a population-based prevention strategy (as defined by the National Institute for Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism) to educate students about alcohol use, abuse and protective factors to minimize high-risk alcohol behaviors. In addition, Miami makes available the CHOICES educational programs for high-risk student populations, such as Greek organization members and student athletes. In addition, the Office of Student Wellness conducts awareness campaigns during National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week.

When students are sanctioned for violations, Miami University mandates one of two education programs, the Alternatives Program and the Chemical Abuse Education Program.

The Alternatives Program is a two-hour program that focuses on decision-making and responsible actions around alcohol use. The Chemical Abuse Education Program (CAEP), which is a four-hour program, focuses more specifically on drug use, abuse, and dependence. The primary focus of each program is to help students gain a broader knowledge regarding alcohol and other drug use by providing factual information about alcohol and other drug use and the negative consequences that may result from chemical use. Each program encourages abstinence and informs students of the health risks involved with continued use or abuse of alcohol or other drugs. These education programs also help students examine attitudes and influences, both internal and external, which affect their choices regarding chemical use.

Such programs support Miami's drug-free policy and employees and students are informed of Miami's drug-free policy and its implications. Employees are offered smoking cessation programs and, through an employee assistance program, counseling on alcohol or drug abuse, among other benefits.


Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

Substance Use Assessment 

When a student is charged with a second Code 105B or 106B violation, or first Code 105A or 106A violation the student is referred for a substance use assessment (see Code of Student Conduct Handbook for details about code violations). The Student Counseling Service (SCS) works in conjunction with the Office of Ethics and Student Conflict Resolution to provide these assessments to full-time Miami University students. The recommendations resulting from the substance use assessment are strictly confidential and not a part of the student's academic record. Students need to plan to spend 60-90 minutes, to complete the assessment. Students are charged $250.00 for the substance use assessment, which appears on the student’s bursar account. Alcohol/drug assessments do not have to be completed at SCS. Students may contact SCS at (513) 529-4634 for either scheduling a substance use assessment or to get a list of private community practitioners and drug and alcohol treatment facilities. 

Once an appointment is made, the student is expected to attend. If the student does not come to the appointment, she/he will be charged a $25.00 no-show fee and will not be permitted to reschedule their appointment with SCS and will be required to schedule their substance use assessment with a private community provider or drug and alcohol treatment facility.  

Group and Other Counseling 

Transformations Group

This group meets weekly and is for students contemplating making changes in their alcohol/drug use. This is a psycho-educational group.  Members will examine their substance use and how it impacts their academics, relationships, personal goals. Students may be self-referred to group, or referred by the court system, parents, or Miami University. Upon court approval, this group can be used to fulfill 10 hours of substance use education. Any information disclosed in group about the misuse of legal or illegal substance use is strictly confidential.

AA Meetings Near Campus

Every Monday night at 8:00 p.m. there is an open Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) meeting in United Campus Ministries, 16 South Campus Ave. Oxford, OH. A Smart Recovery group now also meets at 5:30 p.m Tuesdays in Oxford. 

Miami's Psychology Department

Operates a fee-for-service clinic located in the Psychology Building (room 39). Sessions are $25.00 each. Therapists are students in the doctoral program in clinical psychology at Miami University. If the fee poses a hardship, you are encouraged to speak to the therapist with whom you meet to discuss this issue. Appointments may be scheduled in the Psychology Clinic by calling the clinic directly at 513-529-2423.

The Haven at College
The Haven at College outpatient substance abuse treatment program opened fall 2017 at 16 S. Campus Ave.
24-Hour Crisis Hotline (1 (844) 427-4747)

The Butler County 24-hr Crisis Hotline 1 (844) 427-4747 is available to assist callers who are facing a wide variety of concerns. 

Professionally trained crisis consultants connect people to the resources they need and offer a supportive, caring ear to those who are in crisis or in need of support. The 24–Hour Crisis Hotline Information/Referral is certified by the Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services (ODMHAS) as a Behavioral Health Hotline. It is one of the few mental health programs to be accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, which sets the highest standards for crisis centers in the United States.

Medication Assisted Treatment of Addiction

Students that have problems with alcohol or drugs may have difficulty staying sober. The staff psychiatrist at Miami University prescribes many different medications to assist in recovery including Naltrexone (Vivitrol, Revia), Buprenorphine/Naloxone (Suboxone, Zubsolv ), Disulfuram (Antabuse), and Varencycline (Chantix). These medications can assist with recovery from substances including alcohol, pain pills, heroin, and nicotine.

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For Students and Employees

Drug-Free Environment – from the Miami University Information and Policy Manual

Purpose

Miami University is dedicated to providing a safe, healthy, and efficient workplace for its employees and for the entire University community.  Therefore, Miami University recognizes that one of its most important obligations to its employees and students is to maintain a completely alcohol- and drug-free workplace.


Policy

  1. The illegal use of drugs or alcohol in the workplace or on University property or as part of any University activity is strictly prohibited.
  2. Employees may not be under the influence of drugs or alcohol in the workplace.
  3. The unlawful manufacture, distribution, dispensation, possession, or use of a controlled substance on University property or as part of any University activity is strictly prohibited.
  4. Students and employees must notify Miami University of any criminal drug statute conviction for a violation occurring on University property no later than five (5) days after such conviction.
  5. Any student who violates any portion of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action, including suspension or dismissal, under the Code of Student Conduct.  Any employee who violates any portion of this policy will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including discharge under the appropriate disciplinary procedures.
  6. The University reserves the right to include completion of an appropriate rehabilitation program as a disciplinary sanction.

For a description of the applicable legal sanctions under local, state, or federal law for the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol, the health risks associated with the use of illicit drugs and the abuse of alcohol or a description of drug and alcohol counseling, treatment, rehabilitation, or re-entry programs that are available to employees or students, please consult Miami’s Annual Security Report.

Medical Marijuana 

As a recipient of federal funding, such as student financial aid and federal grants and contracts for research, Miami University is required to follow federal law including the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act and the Drug-Free Workplace Act.  In order to comply with these laws, Miami University prohibits the manufacture, dispensation, possession, use, or distribution of marijuana in any form on any University-owned property, in the conduct of University business or as part of any University activity.  Beginning September 8, 2016, Ohio law will allow certain activities related to the possession and use of medical marijuana. However, using and possessing marijuana continues to be prohibited by and a violation of University policy and remains a crime under federal law.

This prohibition applies even when the possession and use would be legal under the laws of the State of Ohio. As a result, those with medical marijuana prescriptions/cards are not permitted to use medical marijuana on campus, in the conduct of University business or as part of any University activity. Sanctions for students and employees who are found to be in possession of or using marijuana include suspension, dismissal and/or termination of employment.

This prohibition does not extend to research related to marijuana that is approved by:

  1. The Agency for Health Care Research and Quality;
  2. The National Institutes of Health;
  3. The National Academy of Sciences;
  4. The centers for Medicare and Medicaid services;
  5. The United States Department of Defense;
  6. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention;
  7. The United States Department of Veterans’ Affairs;
  8. The Drug Enforcement Administration;
  9. The Food and Drug Administration;
  10. Any board recognized by the National Institutes of Health for the purpose of evaluating the medical value of health care services.

The University will accommodate students who are legally authorized Ohio medical marijuana users.  These students may submit a letter asking to be released from their University housing and dining obligations to the Dean of Students at DeanofStudents@miamioh.edu.


For Employees

Legal and Responsible Use of Alcohol 

The right to acquire, possess, and consume alcoholic beverages is limited by laws that establish minimum drinking ages, drinking and driving laws, and so on. Miami University also has established policies on alcohol use on campus and by campus groups. It is incumbent on students, faculty, and staff to become knowledgeable regarding these policies, whether for individual decision-making or for planning programs and events for a department or organization, including student organizations.

On-Campus Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages – Compliance with Law 

All on-campus possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages must be conducted in accordance with Ohio law and University policy regarding the possession, sale, and consumption of alcohol. Specifically:

  1. Individuals under the age of twenty-one (21) may not purchase, possess, or consume beer, wine, or intoxicating liquor. It is also against the law for any person to furnish beer, wine, or intoxicating liquor to any person under twenty-one (21) years of age.
  2. No person shall have in his or her possession any open container of beer, wine, or intoxicating liquor in any public place except where the alcoholic beverage has been lawfully purchased for consumption on the premises of the holder of the appropriate permit from the State Department of Liquor Control.
  3. Only beer and wine (no intoxicating liquor) may be served at on-campus events to which students are invited. Exceptions must be approved, in writing, by the Senior Vice President for Finance and Business Services.

Alcohol Guidelines for Faculty and Staff 

General Rules

In the presence of students, faculty and staff are expected to model responsible adult behavior by either abstaining from the use of alcohol or consuming alcohol in moderation. At no time should a member of the faculty or staff be intoxicated in the presence of students or at a University event.   In addition:

  1. University faculty and staff may not purchase alcohol for undergraduate students – even if the student is of legal age to consume alcohol. This prohibition applies both on and off-campus, including restaurants, bars, athletic events, alumni events, events with cash bars and study away/ abroad trips.
  2. Although strongly discouraged, faculty and staff who elect to purchase or serve alcohol to graduate students do so at their own risk and bear full legal responsibility. Faculty are encouraged to educate themselves about the laws regarding civil liability and to be aware that those who serve alcoholic beverages to underage students may be charged criminally. Faculty who elect to serve graduate students who are of age in their home are strongly encouraged to have a TIPS trained bartender who can ensure that alcohol is only dispensed to participants who are 21 years of age or older and that only a modest amount of alcohol is served.
  3. Faculty and staff should not accompany graduate or undergraduate students to restaurants, bars, clubs, and fraternity houses etc., where they are aware that underage drinking is taking place or where students are intoxicated.
  4. Faculty and staff advisers to student organizations must be especially careful to encourage the student organization to adhere to University policy and civil law concerning the use of alcohol, and must never join them in breaking the law. Rather, they should encourage students to obey civil law and University policy concerning the use of alcohol and help them to understand how to use alcohol in a legal and responsible manner.

Alcohol at University Sponsored Events – On-Campus

When a department, institute, center, or other University office invites students to a University gathering/event held on-campus, the following guidelines apply:

  1. Events Held in Licensed University Facilities (Armstrong Student Center, Shriver Center, Marcum Conference Center, Goggin Ice Arena, Yager Stadium and Millet Assembly Hall)
    1. Alcohol may only be provided through the facility and must be dispensed by TIPS trained bartenders.
    2. Only those 21 and older may consume alcohol.
    3. The event must also include nonalcoholic beverages as an alternative to alcohol and hors d'oeuvres must be served.
    4. If the event is scheduled to last longer than two (2) hours, a meal must be provided, and the bar closed at least one-half hour before the event ends.
    5. If a flat fee for attendance is charged (e.g., a ticket is $35 ), the cost of the alcoholic drinks must be borne by individual consumers (e.g., cash bar) and may not be included in the fee.
    6. Alcohol may only be charged to an unrestricted gift account and cannot be charged to a departmental account or student organization account.
    7. University faculty and staff may not purchase alcohol for students.
  2. Events Held in Other University Facilities:
    1. Alcohol must be purchased from the University and may not be “carried in” by faculty or staff. Alcohol must be dispensed by TIPS trained bartenders provided by University catering.
    2. Only those 21 and older may consume alcohol.
    3. No admission fee may be charged and no alcohol may be sold (e.g. no cash bars);
    4. The hosting department must also provide nonalcoholic beverages as an alternative to alcohol and non-salty snacks must be served.
    5. Events may not be scheduled to last longer than 90 minutes.
    6. Alcohol may only be charged to an unrestricted gift account and cannot be charged to a departmental account or student organization account.
    7. The approval of the Senior Vice President for Finance and Business Services is required.

Alcohol at University Sponsored Events – Off-Campus

When a department, institute, center, or other University office invites students to a University gathering/event to be held in an off-campus facility (e.g. restaurant, bars, clubs) the following Guidelines apply:

  1. University faculty and staff may not purchase or provide alcohol for prospective, undergraduate, or graduate students – even if the student is of legal age to consume alcohol.
  2. Only those 21 and older may consume alcohol.
  3. Departmental funds (including program fees) may not be used to purchase alcohol. Alcohol may only be charged to an unrestricted gift account and cannot be charged to a departmental account or student organization account.

Drug Testing

Miami University is dedicated to providing a safe, healthy, and efficient workplace for its employees and for the entire University community. As a result, Miami University recognizes that one of its most important obligations is to maintain a drug and alcohol-free workplace. Reasonable Cause and Post-Accident drug and alcohol testing may only be conducted pursuant to properly adopted work-place rules or a collective bargaining agreement. Employees are encouraged to take advantage of the University’s employee assistance program (EAP) for substance abuse issues.


Counseling, Treatment and Rehabilitation Services

24-Hour Crisis Hotline (1 (844) 427-4747)

The Butler County 24-hr Crisis Hotline 1 (844) 427-4747 is available to assist callers who are facing a wide variety of concerns. 

Professionally trained crisis consultants connect people to the resources they need and offer a supportive, caring ear to those who are in crisis or in need of support. The 24–Hour Crisis Hotline Information/Referral is certified by the Ohio Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services (ODMHAS) as a Behavioral Health Hotline. It is one of the few mental health programs to be accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, which sets the highest standards for crisis centers in the United States.

Employee Assistance Programs

Employees covered under Miami's group life insurance policy issued by Liberty Mutual are eligible for two employee assistance programs (EAP).

      MyLibertyAssist

Online: www.bensingerdupont.com/MLA (password: MLASSIST)
Telephone: 1-877-695-2789 (1-877MYLBRTY)

      Life Services

Access: http://lm.bdalifeservices.com (Username: mllife)

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Laws

The following is a description of some of the applicable legal sanctions under federal, state, and local laws for the unlawful possession, use, or distribution of illicit drugs, including alcohol. This list is not intended to be an exhaustive list of all offenses involving drugs and alcohol, and this material should not be relied upon as legal advice or guidance regarding these offenses.

Federal Law

Federal law prohibits the trafficking and illegal possession of controlled substances as outlined in 21 United States Code, Sections 841 and 844. Depending on the amount possessed, first offense maximum penalties for trafficking marijuana range from five years’ imprisonment with a $250,000 fine to imprisonment for life with a $10 million fine for an individual, and from five years imprisonment with a $1 million fine to imprisonment for life with a $50 million fine if not an individual. Also depending on the amount possessed, first offense maximum penalties for trafficking Class I and Class II controlled substances (methamphetamine, heroin, cocaine, cocaine base, PCP, LSD, fentanyl analogue) range from five years’ imprisonment with a $5 million fine to imprisonment for life with a $10 million fine for an individual, and from five years’ imprisonment with a $25 million fine to imprisonment for life with a $50 million fine if not an individual. First offense penalties for simple possession, 21 USC §844, range from at most one years’ imprisonment or at least a $1,000, fine or both; to at most 20 years’ imprisonment and a fine of at least a $1,000.  For the most current and complete information regarding federal penalties for drug trafficking, please visit the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration’s Federal Trafficking Penalties webpage at https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/ftp3.shtml


State Law

Ohio Revised Code (ORC) Section 2925.02 provides that no person shall knowingly corrupt another with drugs by inducing or forcing them to use a controlled substance.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Mandatory imprisonment from 6 months to 10 years, depending upon amount and type of drug involved and history of previous drug abuse offenses.

ORC 2925.03 provides that no person shall knowingly "traffick" in controlled or illicit substances, including marijuana. Trafficking includes selling, offering to sell, delivering, distributing, preparing, cultivating, and manufacturing of controlled substances.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Mandatory fines range from $100 to $20,000, depending on offense and drug involved. Mandatory jail sentences range from 6 months to 10 years.

ORC 2925.11 provides that no person shall knowingly obtain, possess, or use a controlled substance.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Drug abuse involving amounts of marijuana less than 100 grams carries a penalty of $100. Other violations involving marijuana result in mandatory jail terms of not more than 8 years and mandatory fines of $15,000. Drug abuse offenses involving other drugs may result in jail terms of up to 10 years and fines of $20,000.

ORC 2925.12 provides that no person shall make obtain, possess, or use drug abuse instruments.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: A first offence can carry a jail term of up to 90 days and fines of $750.

ORC 2925.14 provides that no person shall knowingly use, possess with purpose to use, sell, manufacture or advertise drug paraphernalia.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Depending upon the facts, imprisonment up to 6 months and fines up to $1,000.

ORC 2925.31 provides, except for lawful research, clinical, medical, dental, or veterinary purposes, no person with intent to induce intoxication or similar effect, shall obtain, possess, or use a harmful intoxicant.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Up to $1,000 and 6 months in jail. ORC 2925.37 provides that no person shall knowingly possess, make, sell, or deliver counterfeit controlled substances.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Depending upon the facts, the penalty can be up to 180 days in jail and a $1,000 fine, but aggravating circumstances can cause the offense to become a felony of the fourth degree with prison terms between 6-18 months and a fine up to $5,000. State law, alcohol ORC 4301.63 provides that no person under the age of 21 years shall purchase beer or intoxicating liquor.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: A fine of not less than $25 nor more than $100 may be imposed. The court may order that the fine be paid by the performance of public work at a reasonable hourly rate established by the court and shall designate the time within which the public work shall be completed.

ORC 4301.631 provides that no underage person can purchase low alcohol beverages, that no person may furnish low alcohol beverages to an underage person, and that no person shall allow underage persons to consume low alcohol beverages on his/her property.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Punishments for violating ORC 4301.631 range from fines of $25 to $250 and imprisonment up to 30 days.

ORC 4301.633 provides that no person shall knowingly furnish any false information as to the name, age, or other identification of any person under 21 years of age for the purpose of obtaining beer or intoxicating liquor for a person under 21 years of age, by purchase or as a gift.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a $1,000 fine.

ORC 4301.634 provides that no person under the age of 21 years shall knowingly show or give false information concerning his name, age, or other identification for the purpose of purchasing or otherwise obtaining beer or intoxicating liquor in any place in this state where beer or intoxicating liquor is sold under a permit issued by the department of liquor control.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a $1,000 fine.

ORC 4301.64 prohibits the consumption of any beer or intoxicating liquor in a motor vehicle.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the fourth degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 30 days and a $250 fine.

ORC 4301.69(A) prohibits selling beer or intoxicating liquor to a person under the age of 21 years, or buying it for or furnishing it to such a person.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a fine of not less than $500 and no more than $1,000.

ORC 4301.69(E) provides that no underage person shall knowingly possess or consume any beer or intoxicating liquor, in any public or private place, unless he is accompanied by a parent, spouse, or legal guardian, who is not an underage person, or unless the beer or intoxicating liquor is given for medical or religious purposes.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a $1,000 fine.

ORC 4511.19 prohibits any person from driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol and/or any drug of abuse.

PENALTY FOR VIOLATION: Misdemeanor of the first degree. The maximum penalty is imprisonment for not more than 6 months and a $1,000 fine, in addition to license suspension. Penalties for repeat offenders can result in up to 5 years in prison.


Local Law

The cities of Oxford, Hamilton and Middletown, West Chester Township, and the cities of Upper Arlington, Dublin and Coldwater enforce all the state criminal statutes cited above. Police in Differdange, Luxembourg, follow the laws of their jurisdiction and country. In addition, each of the Ohio municipalities list some additional sanctions for alcohol and other drug use, including without limitation, prohibitions against: driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs; possession and consumption of alcohol while underage; providing alcohol to underage persons; having an open container of alcohol in public places; possession of a controlled substance; purchasing and consuming low-alcohol beverages by underage persons, using false representations by underage persons to obtain alcohol; permitting the consumption of alcohol by underage persons at a person's property (including hotel rooms), and hosting a party where alcohol or drug abuse occurs.

Current Assessments of Possible Health Risks

This listing of possible health risks associated with drug use/abuse is taken from Drugs of Abuse, published by the Department of Justice (1989) and What Works: Schools Without Drugs, published by the Department of Education (1989). For more information on commonly abused drugs, visit the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Stimulants: speed up action of the central nervous system

Name (slang): Amphetamines (speed, uppers, pep pills, bennies)
  • Hallucinations may occur.
  • Tolerance, psychological and sometimes physical dependence can develop.
  • Continued high doses can cause heart problems, malnutrition, death.
Name (slang): Cocaine (coke, snow, crack, rock cocaine) legally classified as a narcotic
  • Confusion, depression, hallucinations may occur.
  • Tolerance and physical dependence can develop.
  • Effects are unpredictable - convulsions, coma, and death are possible.
  • Nasal membranes may be destroyed.
  • Smoking may cause lesions in lungs.

Depressants: relax the central nervous system

Name (slang): Barbiturates (barbs, goof balls, downers, blues)
  • Confusion, loss of coordination, etc. may occur.
  • Tolerance, physical and psychological dependence can develop.

Tranquilizers

  • An overdose can cause coma, death.
  • Depressants taken in combinations or with alcohol are especially dangerous.

Cannabis: alters mood and perception

Name (slang): Marijuana (grass, pot, weed, reefer); Hashish (hash); Hashish oil (hash oil)
  • Confusion, loss of coordination; with large doses, hallucinations may occasionally occur.
  • Longterm use may cause moderate tolerance, psychological dependence.
  • Longterm use may cause damage to lung tissue.

Hallucinogens: temporarily distort reality

Name (slang): Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD, acid)
  • Hallucinations, panic may occur.
  • Effects may recur (flashbacks) even after use is discontinued.
  • Possible birth defects in users' children.
Name (slang): Phencyclidine (PCP, angel dust) legally classified as a depressant
  • Depression, hallucinations, confusion, irrational behavior.
  • Tolerance develops.
  • An overdose can cause convulsions, coma, death.
Name: Mescaline, MDA, DMT, STP, psilocybin, "designer drugs"
  • Effects are similar to those of LSD.

Narcotics: lower perception of pain

Name (slang): Heroin (H, scag, horse, junk, smack); Morphine (M, dreamer); Codeine; Opium
  • Lethargy, apathy, loss of judgment and self-control may occur.
  • Tolerance, physical and psychological dependence can develop.
  • An overdose can cause convulsions, death.
  • Risks of use include malnutrition, infection, hepatitis.

Deliriants: cause mental confusion

Name (slang): Aerosols; Lighter fluid; Paint thinner; Amyl nitrite (poppers); Other inhalants
  • Loss of coordination, confusion, hallucinations may occur.
  • An overdose can cause convulsions, death.
  • Psychological dependence can develop.
  • Permanent damage to lungs, brain, liver, bone marrow can result.

Alcohol

  • Longterm, heavy drinking is linked to cancer, heart and liver damage, and other serious illnesses. Tolerance, physical and psychological dependence can develop.

Nicotine

  • Long-term cigarette smoking is linked to emphysema, lung cancer, heart disease. Physical and psychological dependence can result.

Caffeine found in coffee and colas is a stimulant drug but is not controlled by law.

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