J. Scott Brown

Fall 2017 Office Hours

Mondays and Wednesdays 1-2

J. Scott Brown received his PhD from Duke University in 2002. Before arriving at Miami University in 2005, Dr. Brown spent time as a postdoctoral fellow in the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focuses broadly on inequalities in health and aging and on developing measures and statistical tools to understand and evaluate these inequalities. Currently, Dr. Brown is working on a project (with Dr. Scott M. Lynch of Duke University) funded by the National Institutes of Health that examines the role geographic region, especially the region in which an individual is socialized as a child or adolescent, on late life health outcomes. Dr. Brown teaches a variety of courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels examining topics such as the sociology of aging, disability, and race/ethnic inequalities. He also teaches a variety of graduate statistics and quantitative methodology courses. 

Publications

Students authors denoted in bold italics.

  1. Lynch, Scott M. and J. Scott Brown. (2010). “Obtaining Multistate Life Table Distributions for Highly-Refined Subpopulations from Cross-Sectional Data: A Bayesian Extension of Sullivan‟s Method.” Demography 47: 1053-1077.
  2. Carr, Dawn, Glenn W. Muschert, Jennifer Kinney, Emily Robbins, Gina Petonito, Lydia Manning, and J. Scott Brown. (2010). “Silver Alerts and the Problem of Missing Adults with Dementia.” The Gerontologist 50: 149-157.
  3. Elder, Glen H., Jr., Elizabeth C. Clipp, J. Scott Brown, Leslie R. Martin, and Howard W. Friedman. (2009). “The Life-Long Mortality Risks of World War II Experiences.” Research on Aging 31: 391-412.
  4. Brown, J. Scott, Sarah O. Meadows, and Glen H. Elder, Jr. (2007). “Race-Ethnic Inequality and Psychological Distress: Depressive Symptoms from Adolescence to Young Adulthood.” Developmental Psychology 43: 1295-1311.
  5. Hitlin, Steven, J. Scott Brown, and Glen H. Elder, Jr. (2007). “Measuring Latinos: Racial Classification and Self-Understandings.” Social Forces 86: 587-611.