EHS Learning Outcomes

Assessment and Evaluation, Certificate

  1. Design a program evaluation;
  2. Develop tests and surveys;
  3. Evaluate test and survey data;
  4. Use a number of appropriate software tools;
  5. Assess, use and interpret evaluation and assessment databases

Autism Spectrum Disorders, Certificate (Undergraduate)

  1. Identify all diagnostic characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorder from the DSM-V perspective, including the range of manifestations on the spectrum; and the ways in which individuals with ASD have been marginalized, excluded and "othered" by school systems and policies; and will identify the ways in which individuals with ASD have developed a sense of identity and agency linked to their ASD;
  2. Identify and describe current research and trends regarding etiology, treatment approaches and systems of support for individuals with ASD; (3) Identify, describe and develop systems of evidence-based support and intervention for school-aged individuals with ASD in the areas of academic development, communication, and social interaction.

Early Childhood Education, B.S.

  1. Knowing and understanding young children’s characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8;
  2. Knowing and understanding the multiple influences on early development and learning;
  3. Using developmental knowledge to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children;
  4. Knowing about and understanding diverse family and community characteristics;
  5. Supporting and engaging families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships;
  6. Involving families and communities in young children’s development and learning;
  7. Understanding the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment – including its use in development of appropriate goals, curriculum, and teaching strategies for young children;
  8. Knowing about and using observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches, including the use of technology in documentation, assessment and data collection;
  9. Understanding and practicing responsible assessment to promote positive outcomes for each child, including the use of assistive technology for children with disabilities;
  10. Knowing about assessment partnerships with families and with professional colleagues to build effective learning environments;
  11. Understanding positive relationships and supportive interactions as the foundation of their work with young children;
  12. Knowing and understanding effective strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology;
  13. Using a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching /learning approaches;
  14. Reflecting on own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child;
  15. Understanding content knowledge and resources in academic disciplines: language and literacy; the arts – music, creative movement, dance, drama, visual arts; mathematics; science, physical activity, physical education, health and safety; and social studies;
  16. Knowing and using the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines;
  17. Using own knowledge, appropriate early learning standards, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally meaningful and challenging curriculum for each child;
  18. Identifying and involving oneself with the early childhood field;
  19. Knowing about and upholding ethical standards and other early childhood professional guidelines;
  20. Engaging in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource;
  21. Integrating knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education;
  22. Engaging in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession

Educational Leadership, Ed.D.

  1. Describe and utilize theories and principles of justice and equity as relevant to the problems of P-12 educational institutions and their contexts;
  2. Articulate concepts and multiple perspectives on democratic life and democratic governance as related to P-12 institutions and communities;
  3. Use conceptions of cultural identity and cultural diversity to benefit and collaborate with diverse individuals, families, and communities in their school or district;
  4. Collaborate and communicate across diverse contexts to work with multiple constituencies and communities in partnerships;
  5. Relate theory and abstract thinking with concrete, applied analysis of problems of practice, and of the “craft” of education;
  6. Utilize tools and capacities for inquiry situated in their own practice, and understand how to use these to generate knowledge that can transform educational organizations, keeping in mind their cultural, political, and policy contexts;
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of technological literacies for school and community leadership

Educational Leadership, Ph.D.

  1. Describe and interpret the foundations of democratic education;
  2. Explain and assess the social-cultural context of schooling including contemporary educational policy and reform;
  3. Connect issues of power, diversity, and equity to social justice education;
  4. Integrate dimensions of leadership, culture, and curriculum through comprehensive exams (or key benchmark assessments);
  5. Design, propose, and write an independent research or inquiry project

Educational Psychology, M.Ed.

  1. Compare and debate theories of educational psychology and apply theoretical ideas to educational cases;
  2. Collect and describe data collected from a practicing educator on educational psychology theories with relevance to classroom practice;
  3. Design a study to investigate a question related to educational psychology research, including literature review, methodology, and protection of human subjects issues;
  4. Conduct the planned research study, prepare report and orally present study findings and conclusions to educational psychology committee

Educational Technology, M.Ed.

  1. Design and develop inclusive instructional media, methods, and systems which integrate data-driven research in the diverse disciplines that inform instructional design;
  2. Conduct analyses (needs, learner and task) for a learning environment and target learners for the purposes of informing the design, development, evaluation, and selection of instructional media, materials, methods, and systems to meet instructional design needs for target learners;
  3. Design, develop, and evaluate inclusive instructional media, materials, methods, and systems which integrate various types of technology and technology media for teaching and learning to meet instructional design needs for target learners;
  4. Develop formative and summative evaluations for models and methods of instructional design integrating emerging innovations in technology to meet instructional design needs for target learners

Foreign Language Education, B.S. Education (Chinese, Latin, French, German, Spanish)

  1. Speak in the interpersonal mode of communication at a minimum level of "Advanced Low" or "Intermediate High" (for Arabic, Chinese, Japanese and Korean) on the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) according to the target language being taught;
  2. Interpret oral, printed, and video texts by demonstrating both literal and figurative or symbolic comprehension;
  3. Present oral and written information to audiences of listeners or readers, using language at a minimum level of "Advanced Low" or "Intermediate High" according to the target language being taught;
  4. Demonstrate target cultural understandings and compare cultures through perspectives, products, and practices of those cultures;
  5. Demonstrate understanding of linguistics and the changing nature of language, and compare language systems;
  6. Demonstrate understanding of texts on literary and cultural themes as well as interdisciplinary topics;
  7. Demonstrate an understanding of key principles of language acquisition and create linguistically and culturally rich learning environments;
  8. Demonstrate an understanding of child and adolescent development to create a supportive learning environment for each student;
  9. Demonstrate an understanding of the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century or their recently refreshed version World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages (2015) and their state standards and use them as the basis for instructional planning;
  10. Integrate the goal areas of the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century or their recently refreshed version World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages (2015) and their state standards in their classroom practice;
  11. Use the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century or their recently refreshed version World-Readiness Standards for Learning Languages (2015) and their state standards to select and integrate authentic texts, use technology, and adapt and create instructional materials for use in communication;
  12. Design and use ongoing authentic performance assessments using a variety of assessment models for all learners, including diverse students;
  13. Reflect on and analyze the results of student assessments, adjust instruction accordingly, and use data to inform and strengthen subsequent instruction;
  14. Interpret and report the results of student performances to all stakeholders in the community, with particular emphasis on building student responsibility for their own learning;
  15. Engage in ongoing professional development opportunities that strengthen their own linguistic, cultural and pedagogical competence and promote reflection on practice;
  16. Articulate the role and value of languages and cultures in preparing all students to interact in the global community of the 21st century through collaboration and advocacy with all stakeholders;
  17. Use inquiry and reflection to understand and explain the opportunities and responsibilities inherent in being a professional language educator and demonstrate a commitment to equitable and ethical interactions with all students, colleagues and other stakeholders

Human Brain and Learning, Certificate

  1. Identify areas in the neuro-and cognitive sciences that have relevant application to teaching and learning in formal and informal learning settings such as emotion and learning, memory, attention, cognitive development, literacy, and numeracy;
  2. Identify and analyze advanced brain structures and functions;
  3. Conduct and interpret EEG research studies;
  4. Synthesize research findings and consider relevance to educational interventions increasing our understanding of cognition and the brain

Inclusive Special Education, B.S.

  1. Understand how exceptionalities may interact with development and learning and use this knowledge to provide meaningful and challenging learning experiences for individuals with exceptionalities;
  2. Be able to create safe, inclusive, culturally responsive learning environments so that individuals with exceptionalities become active and effective learners and develop emotional well-being, positive social interactions, and self-determination;
  3. Understand the central concepts, structures of the discipline, and tools of inquiry of the content areas they teach, and can organize this knowledge, integrate cross-disciplinary skills, and develop meaningful learning progressions for individuals with exceptionalities;
  4. Use multiple methods of assessment and data sources in making educational decisions;
  5. Select, adapt, and use a repertoire of evidence-based instructional strategies to advance learning of individuals with exceptionalities.;
  6. Use foundational knowledge of the field and their professional ethical principles and practice standards to inform special education practice, to engage in lifelong learning, and to advance the profession;
  7. Collaborate with families, other educators, related service providers, individuals with exceptionalities, and personnel from community agencies in culturally responsive ways to address the needs of individuals with exceptionalities across a range of learning experiences.

Instructional Design & Technology, M.A.

  1. Design and develop inclusive instructional media, methods, and systems which integrate data-driven research in the diverse disciplines that inform instructional design;
  2. Conduct analyses (needs, learner and task) for a learning environment and target learners for the purposes of informing the design, development, evaluation, and selection of instructional media, materials, methods, and systems to meet instructional design needs for target learners;
  3. Design, develop, and evaluate inclusive instructional media, materials, methods, and systems which integrate various types of technology and technology media for teaching and learning to meet instructional design needs for target learners;
  4. Develop formative and summative evaluations for models and methods of instructional design integrating emerging innovations in technology to meet instructional design needs for target learners.

Integrated Language Arts Education, B.S.

  1. Demonstrate knowledge about how adolescents read texts and make meaning through interaction with media environments:
  2. Demonstrate knowledge about how adolescents compose texts and make meaning through interaction with media environments;
  3. Design or knowledgeably select appropriate reading assessments that inform instruction by providing data about student interests, reading proficiencies, and reading processes;
  4. Plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences in reading that reflect knowledge of current theory and research about the teaching and learning of reading and that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and a variety of reading strategies;
  5. Plan and implement instruction based on ELA curricular requirements and standards, school and community contexts, and knowledge about candidates’ linguistic and cultural backgrounds:
  6. Use data about their candidates’ individual differences, identities, and funds of knowledge for literacy learning to create inclusive learning environments that contextualize curriculum and instruction and help candidates participate actively in their own learning in ELA;
  7. Differentiate instruction based on candidates’ self-assessments and formal and informal assessments of learning in English language arts; candidates communicate with candidates about their performance in ways that actively involve them in their own learning;
  8. Plan and implement English language arts and literacy instruction that promotes social justice and critical engagement with complex issues related to maintaining a diverse, inclusive, equitable society;
  9. Compose a range of formal and informal texts taking into consideration the interrelationships among form, audience, context, and purpose; candidates understand that writing is a recursive process; candidates can use contemporary technologies and/or digital media to compose multimodal discourse;
  10. Know the conventions of English language as they relate to various rhetorical situations (grammar, usage, and mechanics), including understanding the concept of dialect and are familiar with relevant grammar systems (e.g., descriptive and prescriptive), understanding principles of language acquisition, recognizing the influence of English language history on ELA content; and understanding the impact of language on society;
  11. Design a range of authentic assessments (e.g., formal and informal, formative and summative) of reading and literature that demonstrate an understanding of how learners develop and that address interpretive, critical, and evaluative abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and presenting;
  12. Plan instruction that incorporates knowledge of language—structure, history, and conventions—to facilitate candidates’ comprehension and interpretation of print and non-print text;
  13. Use knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant composing experiences that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and contemporary technologies and reflect an understanding of writing processes and strategies in different genres for a variety of purposes and audiences;
  14. Design a range of assessments for candidates that promote their development as writers, are appropriate to the writing task, and are consistent with current research and theory;
  15. Respond to student writing in process and to finished texts in ways that engage candidates’ ideas and encourage their growth as writers over time;
  16. Design instruction related to the strategic use of language conventions (grammar, usage, and mechanics) in the context of candidates’ writing for different audiences, purposes, and modalities;
  17. Select, create, and use a variety of instructional strategies and teaching resources, including contemporary technologies and digital media, consistent with what is currently known about student learning in English Language Arts;
  18. Model literate and ethical practices in ELA teaching, and engage in/reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA;
  19. Engage in and reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA that demonstrate understanding of and readiness for leadership, collaboration, ongoing professional development, and community engagement;
  20. Demonstrate knowledge about texts—print and non-print texts, media texts, classic texts and contemporary texts, including young adult—that represent a range of world literatures, historical traditions, genres, and the experiences of different genders, ethnicities, and social classes; they are able to use literary theories to interpret and critique a range of texts;
  21. Use knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant learning experiences utilizing a range of different texts—across genres, periods, forms, authors, cultures, and various forms of media—and instructional strategies that are motivating and accessible to all candidates, including English language learners, candidates with special needs, candidates from diverse language and learning backgrounds, those designated as high achieving, and those at risk of failure;
  22. Demonstrate knowledge about how adolescents compose texts and make meaning through interaction with media environments;
  23. Design a range of authentic assessments (e.g., formal and informal, formative and summative) of reading and literature that demonstrate an understanding of how learners develop and that address interpretive, critical, and evaluative abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and presenting;
  24. Design a range of authentic assessments (e.g., formal and informal, formative and summative) of reading and literature that demonstrate an understanding of how learners develop and that address interpretive, critical, and evaluative abilities in reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and presenting;
  25. Design or select appropriate reading assessments that inform instruction by providing data about student interests, reading proficiencies, and reading processes;
  26. Plan instruction that incorporates knowledge of language—structure, history, and conventions—to facilitate candidates’ comprehension and interpretation of print and non-print texts;
  27. Plan instruction which, when appropriate, reflects curriculum integration and incorporates interdisciplinary teaching methods and materials;
  28. Use their knowledge of theory, research, and practice in English Language Arts to plan standards-based, coherent and relevant composing experiences that utilize individual and collaborative approaches and contemporary technologies and reflect an understanding of writing processes and strategies in different genres for a variety of purposes and audiences;
  29. Use a range of assessments for candidates that promote their development as writers, are appropriate to the writing task, and are consistent with current research and theory. Candidates are able to respond to student writing in process and to finished texts in ways that engage candidates’ ideas and encourage their growth as writers over time;
  30. Design instruction related to the strategic use of language conventions (grammar, usage, and mechanics) in the context of candidates’ writing for different audiences, purposes, and modalities;
  31. Design instruction that incorporates candidates’ home and community languages to enable skillful control over their rhetorical choices and language practices for a variety of audiences and purposes;
  32. Plan and implement instruction based on ELA curricular requirements and standards, school and community contexts, and knowledge about candidates’ linguistic and cultural backgrounds;
  33. Use data about their candidates’ individual differences, identities, and funds of knowledge for literacy learning to create inclusive learning environments that contextualize curriculum and instruction and help candidates participate actively in their own learning in ELA;
  34. Differentiate instruction based on candidates’ self-assessments and formal and informal assessments of learning in ELA; candidates communicate with candidates about their performance in ways that actively involve them in their own learning;
  35. Select, create, and use a variety of instructional strategies and teaching resources, including contemporary technologies and digital media, consistent with what is currently known about student learning in English Language Arts;
  36. Use knowledge of theories and research to plan instruction responsive to candidates’ local, national and international histories, individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, gender expression, age, appearance, ability, spiritual belief, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, and community environment), and languages/dialects as they affect candidates’ opportunities to learn in ELA;
  37. Model literate and ethical practices in ELA teaching, and engage in/reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA;
  38. Engage in and reflect on a variety of experiences related to ELA that demonstrate understanding of and readiness for leadership, collaboration, ongoing professional development, and community engagement

Integrated Math Education, B.S.

  1. Demonstrate and apply knowledge of major mathematics concepts, algorithms, procedures, connections, and applications within and among mathematical content domains;
  2. Solve problems, represent mathematical ideas, reason, prove, use mathematical models, attend to precision, identify elements of structure, generalize, engage in mathematical communication, and make connections as essential mathematical practices;
  3. Apply knowledge of curriculum standards for mathematics and their relationship to student learning within and across mathematical domains;
  4. Incorporate research-based mathematical experiences and include multiple instructional strategies and mathematics-specific technological tools in their teaching to develop all students’ mathematical understanding and proficiency;
  5. Provide students with opportunities to do mathematics – talking about it and connecting it to both theoretical and real-world contexts;
  6. Plan, select, implement, interpret, and use formative and summative assessments for monitoring student learning, measuring student mathematical understanding, and informing practice;
  7. Exhibit knowledge of adolescent learning, development, and behavior, and use this knowledge to plan and create sequential learning opportunities grounded in mathematics education research where students are actively engaged in the mathematics they are learning and building from prior knowledge and skills;
  8. Demonstrate a positive disposition toward mathematical practices and learning, include culturally relevant perspectives in teaching, and demonstrate equitable and ethical treatment of and high expectations for all students;
  9. Use instructional tools such as manipulatives, digital tools, and virtual resources to enhance learning while recognizing the possible limitations of such tools;
  10. Provide evidence demonstrating that as a result of their instruction, secondary students’ conceptual understanding, procedural fluency, strategic competence, adaptive reasoning, and application of major mathematics concepts in varied contexts have increased;
  11. Support the continual development of a productive disposition toward mathematics;
  12. Show that new student mathematical knowledge has been created as a consequence of their ability to engage students in mathematical experiences that are developmentally appropriate, require active engagement, and include mathematics-specific technology in building new knowledge;
  13. Recognize that learning is often collaborative, and participate in professional development experiences specific to mathematics and mathematics education, draw upon mathematics education research to inform practice, continuously reflect on their practice, and utilize resources from professional mathematics organizations

Integrated Science Education, B.S.

  1. Provide exemplary science teachers in shortage areas for the state, regional and national levels;
  2. Provide the candidates with authentic science experiences in terms of the latest research, global exchanges, technological advances and teaching methods;
  3. Prepare the candidates to be transformative leaders in science education at the school and district levels as well as to seek leadership opportunities in professional science education organizations (e.g. National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), National Association of Biology Teachers (NABT), American Chemical Society (ACS));
  4. Prepare the candidates with skills and techniques aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), which include inquiry-based teaching and learning as well as experiences with Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education;
  5. Provide the field with graduates who are prepared to teach English language learners (ELL), who can differentiate the curriculum and work with diverse populations of students;
  6. Develop interpretive, normative, and critical analysis capacities relevant to understanding the connections between science education and the four science disciplines;
  7. Act as transformative science educators with regard to social justice, equity issues, and multiculturalism within their school district and as members of the global teaching community.

Integrated Social Studies Education, B.S.

  1. Culture and Cultural Diversity: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of culture and cultural diversity;
  2. Time, Continuity, and Change: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of time, continuity, and change;
  3. People, Places, and Environment: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of people, places, and environment;
  4. Individual Development and Identity; Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individual development and identity;
  5. Individuals, Groups and Institutions: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of individuals, groups, and institutions;
  6. Power, Authority, and Governance: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of power, authority and governance;
  7. Production, Distribution, and Consumption: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and disposition to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services;
  8. Science, Technology and Society: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of science, technology and society;
  9. Global Connections.: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of global connections and interdependence;
  10. Civic Ideals and Practices: Possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of civic ideals and practices.

Integrated Social Studies Education, M.A.T.

  1. Integrate theory and best practices throughout the candidate’s writing and speaking, and demonstrate evidence of higher-order thinking skills in documents; facilitate discussion that demonstrates depth and breadth of knowledge;
  2. Produce written report that supports and enhances all aspects of presentation and shows a thorough understanding of the material presented;
  3. Demonstrate nuanced understanding of questions through exploration and elaboration of their stances on issues or topics, synthesizes information, and answer questions with convincing reasoning;
  4. Maintain a clear, articulate, individual point of view while accurately citing relevant research and scholars to support positions.

PreKindergarten Education, A.A.S.

  1. Use understanding of child growth and development, individual differences, and diverse families, cultures and communities to plan and implement inclusive learning environments that provide each child with equitable access to high quality learning experiences that engage and create learning opportunities for them to meet high standards;
  2. Understand that successful early childhood education depends upon partnerships with children’s families and communities by knowing about, understanding, and valuing the importance and complex characteristics of children’s families and communities and using this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to involve all families in their children’s development and learning;
  3. Assess students, plan instruction and design classroom contexts for learning through formative and summative assessment to monitor students’ learning and guide instruction, learning activities to promote a full range of competencies for each student, and different instructional materials and activities to address learners’ diversity;
  4. Foster engagement in learning by establishing and maintaining social norms for classrooms and building interpersonal relationships with students that generate motivation, and promote students social and emotional development;
  5. Make informed decisions about instruction guided by knowledge of children and assessment of children’s learning that result in the use of a variety of effective instructional practices that employ print, and digital appropriate resources;
  6. Deliver instruction using a cohesive sequence of lessons and employing effective instructional practices, using explicit instruction and effective feedback as appropriate, and using whole class discussions to support and enhance children’s learning. Use flexible grouping arrangements, including small group and individual instruction to support effective instruction and improved learning for every child;
  7. Demonstrate and apply understandings of major concepts, skills, and practices, as they interpret disciplinary curricular standards and related expectations within and across literacy, mathematics, science, and social studies;
  8. Promote learning and development of every child through participation in collaborative learning environments, reflective self-study and professional learning, and involvement in their professional community.

Middle Childhood Education, B.S.

  1. Understand, use, and reflect on the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development and use that knowledge in their practice;
  2. Demonstrate their ability to apply this knowledge when making curricular decisions, planning and implementing instruction, participating in middle level programs and practices, and providing healthy and effective learning environments for all young adolescents;
  3. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of young adolescent development. They use this understanding of the intellectual, physical, social, emotional, and moral characteristics, needs, and interests of young adolescents to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for all young adolescents, including those whose language and cultures are different from their own;
  4. Demonstrate their understanding of the implications of diversity on the development of young adolescents. They implement curriculum and instruction that is responsive to young adolescents’ local, national, and international histories, language/dialects, and individual identities (e.g., race, ethnicity, culture, age, appearance, ability, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, family composition);
  5. Participate successfully in middle level practices that consider and celebrate the diversity of all young adolescents;
  6. Use their knowledge of young adolescent development when planning and implementing middle level curriculum and when selecting and using instructional strategies;
  7. Apply their knowledge of young adolescent development when making decisions about their respective roles in creating and maintaining developmentally responsive learning environments. They demonstrate their ability to participate successfully in effective middle level school organizational practices such as interdisciplinary team organization and advisory programs.

Quantitative Data Analysis in Education and Social Sciences, Certificate

  1. Employ both basic and sophisticated statistics to analyze a given set of data;
  2. Identify appropriate statistical procedures to conduct data analysis;
  3. Create a complete data file, and prepare data for analysis;
  4. Manage large data sets and select appropriate statistical measures for analysis;
  5. Interpret the statistical results and report the findings

School Leadership, M.Ed.

  1. Understand and can collaboratively develop, articulate, implement, and steward a shared vision of learning for a school;
  2. Understand and can collect and use data to identify school goals, assess organizational effectiveness, and implement plans to achieve school goals;
  3. Understand and can promote continual and sustainable school improvement;
  4. Understand and can evaluate school progress and revise school plans supported by school stakeholders;
  5. Understand and can sustain a school culture and instructional program conducive to student learning through collaboration, trust, and a personalized learning environment with high expectations for students;
  6. Understand and can create and evaluate a comprehensive, rigorous, and coherent curricular and instructional school program; understand and can develop and supervise the instructional and leadership capacity of school staff;
  7. Understand and can promote the most effective and appropriate technologies to support teaching and learning in a school environment; understand and can monitor and evaluate school management and operational systems;
  8. Understand and can efficiently use human, fiscal, and technological resources to manage school operations; understand and can promote school-based policies and procedures that protect the welfare and safety of students and staff within the school;
  9. Understand and can develop school capacity for distributed leadership; understand and can ensure teacher and organizational time focuses on supporting high-quality school instruction and student learning;
  10. Understand and can collaborate with faculty and community members by collecting and analyzing information pertinent to the improvement of the school’s educational environment;
  11. Understand and can mobilize community resources by promoting an understanding, appreciation, and use of diverse cultural, social, and intellectual resources within the school community; understand and can respond to community interests and needs by building and sustaining positive school relationships with families and caregivers;
  12. Understand and can respond to community interests and needs by building and sustaining productive school relationships with community partners;
  13. Understand and can act with integrity and fairness to ensure a school system of accountability for every student’s academic and social success;
  14. Understand and can model principles of self-awareness, reflective practice, transparency, and ethical behavior as related to their roles within the school;
  15. Understand and can safeguard the values of democracy, equity, and diversity within the school;
  16. Understand and can evaluate the potential moral and legal consequences of decision making in the school;
  17. Understand and can promote social justice within the school to ensure that individual student needs inform all aspects of schooling;
  18. Understand and can advocate for school students, families, and caregivers;
  19. Understand and can act to influence local, district, state, and national decisions affecting student learning in a school environment;
  20. Understand and can anticipate and assess emerging trends and initiatives in order to adapt school-based leadership strategies

School Psychology, M.S.

Demonstrate knowledge of:

  1. varied methods of assessment and data collection methods for identifying strengths and needs, developing effective services and programs, and measuring progress and outcomes;
  2. varied methods of consultation, collaboration, and communication applicable to individuals, families, groups, and systems and used to promote effective implementation of services;
  3. direct interventions that focus on academic and social/emotional interventions for children and families;
  4. biological, cultural, and social influences on academic skills; human learning, cognitive, and developmental processes; and evidence-based curriculum and instructional strategies;
  5. Demonstrate knowledge of biological, cultural, developmental, and social influences on behavior and mental health; behavioral and emotional impacts on learning and life skills; and evidence-based strategies to promote social–emotional functioning and mental health;
  6. Demonstrate knowledge of direct and indirect services that focus on knowledge of schools and system structures, and preventive and responsive services;
  7. school and systems structure, organization, and theory; general and special education; technology resources; and evidence-based school practices that promote academic outcomes, learning, social development, and mental health;
  8. principles and research related to resilience and risk factors in learning and mental health, services in schools and communities to support multi-tiered prevention, and evidence-based strategies for effective crisis response;
  9. principles and research related to family systems, strengths, needs, and culture; evidence-based strategies to support family influences on children’s learning, socialization, and mental health; and methods to develop collaboration between families and schools;
  10. individual differences, abilities, disabilities, and other diverse characteristics; principles and research related to diversity factors for children, families, and schools, including factors related to culture, context, and individual and role differences; and evidence-based strategies to enhance services and address potential influences related to diversity;
  11. core foundational knowledge and experiences and implement practices and strategies in research, program evaluation, and legal, ethical and professional practice;
  12. research design, statistics, measurement, varied data collection and analysis techniques, and program evaluation methods sufficient for understanding research and interpreting data in applied settings;
  13. history and foundations of school psychology; multiple service models and methods; ethical, legal, and professional standards; and other factors related to professional identity and effective practice as school psychologists.

Special Education, M.A. and M.S. (Online Hybrid Program)

  1. Identify and support learners with all types of developmental differences in the Mild to Moderate range;
  2. Collaborate effectively with students, family members, colleagues and community members for best outcomes for students;
  3. Interpret assessment data effectively and pair this with personal knowledge of students as individuals to design the best educational instruction, strategies and supports that optimize learning outcomes and social interactions;
  4. Advocate for socially just practices in schools with a deep awareness of issues of dis/ability, race, class, gender and sexuality and the ways in which they may impact identification of and/or service delivery for children;
  5. Demonstrate leadership in the field for promoting productive changes consistent with social change and growth

Student Affairs in Higher Education, M.S.

  1. Theory: Understand multiple theories and can educate readers about their importance;
  2. Inquiry: Understands multiple roles of inquiry and methods of research and can effectively apply some of them to investigate questions;
  3. Practice: Demonstrate a firm understanding of personal and professional knowledge and skills related to student affairs practice and is capable of effectively applying them to address campus phenomena;
  4. Integration: Understand and convey the complexities of integrating theory, practice, and inquiry and demonstrates that integration by effectively addressing campus issues;
  5. Personal Transformation Toward Self-Authorship: Convey ideas that are clearly and consistently based on one’s own beliefs, perspectives, identity, and sense of self in relation to others;
  6. Written Communication: Produce writing that is organized, contains well conceptualized and reflective ideas, has few grammatical and APA errors, and conveys clear and sound arguments.

Student Affairs in Higher Education, Ph.D.

  1. Generate and disseminate original research and to integrate theory, inquiry and practice to produce and apply new knowledge in their professional work;
  2. Conduct original research and use existing research to transform student affairs practice to focus on a learning paradigm that integrates more seamlessly with academic components of higher education;
  3. Effectively transform higher education and student affairs practice to promote learning, intercultural maturity, self-authorship, and social engagement;
  4. Transform graduates’ views of the learning enterprise, learners, and educators to enable engagement in a complex and diverse higher education enterprise;
  5. Promote learning partnerships in their educational practice (including student affairs administration and student affairs preparation faculty roles)

Transformative Education, M.Ed.

  1. Develop theories and practices of educational leadership and advocacy to promote transformative outcomes for students in K-12 schools, non-profits, and other education-related settings;
  2. Develop theories and practices of curricular innovation to promote engaging, challenging, and developmentally appropriate learning environments for children and youth;
  3. Evaluate theories and practices of multicultural education to apply to leadership, advocacy, and curriculum strategies to ensure that diverse learners and families can thrive in educational environments;
  4. Conceptualize, construct, and interpret action research projects that enable practitioners to conduct research on their own practice and contexts.