Current Projects

Image of the Upham Arch Image of the Upham Arch

Aging and Disability Business Institute: Phase 2: Advancing Integration, Partnerships and Payment Models Between Social Services and Health Systems

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a), pass-through funds from the John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Suzanne Kunkel
April 2019 - March 2022

The National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a) is creating and implementing a series of business tools and resources to support formal contracting arrangements between community-based organizations and the health care system. Scripps Gerontology Center is working with the n4a to evaluate the effectiveness and overall impact of the resources and interventions offered through this project.

 


Building Evidence for the Our Family, Our Way Communication and Care Coordination Process for Caregiving Families

The Retirement Research Foundation
Principle Investigator: Jennifer Heston
January 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021

The goal of this study is to provide evidence of the impact of the Our Family, Our Way, a communication and care coordination process for caregiving families developed by researchers at Scripps Gerontology Center. Our Family, Our Way is designed to be used by families without the involvement of a professional and provides highly-structured and scripted materials to help address the communication challenges and unequal care and support arrangements that occur in some caregiving families.


Creating a Dementia Inclusive Community in Northwest Ohio through the Expansion of Supports and Services

MemoryLane Care Services, pass-through funds from the Department of Health and Human Services
Principal Investigators: Jennifer Heston & Suzanne Kunkel
September 2018 - September 2021

This project is a three-year collaborative project to build a dementia-inclusive community in the greater Toledo community of Northwest Ohio. Funded by the Administration for Community Living, the project is designed to improve the quality of life for individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease and related dementias (ADRD), those who are exhibiting symptoms but lack a diagnosis, and their caregivers. This project is a partnership with MemoryLane Alzheimer’s and Dementia Care Services, Benjamin Rose Institute, and the Ohio Council for Cognitive Health in which Scripps will provide third-party evaluation.


Effective Partnership Strategies Among Area Agency on Aging Healthy Communities

Yale University, pass-through funds from The Retirement Research Foundation 
Principal Investigator: Suzanne Kunkel
September 2019 - August 2020

Strong coordination among health care and social services providers has been linked with lower levels of avoidable health care use and spending for older adults. The nationwide network of Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) — which provide and coordinate social services for older adults in local communities — could be ideally positioned to convene such cross-partnerships. Evidence is needed, however, to demonstrate how AAA partnerships and programs influence health care use and spending among older adults.
We are therefore proposing a longitudinal study to examine how changes in AAA partnerships and programs over eight years, reported through detailed national surveys in 2008, 2010, 2013, and 2016, correspond with changes in potentially avoidable health care use and spending for older adults in counties covered by the AAAs. Multivariate regression modeling with a difference-in-difference approach will be used to identify the impact of changes in AAA partnerships and programs in individual counties. In addition, we will undertake an in-depth qualitative study of AAAs that have established the most advanced and effective partnership networks supporting the health of older adults, to uncover comprehensive information on how AAAs establish and maintain such networks.
This project will produce the first evidence regarding potential causal links between activities of the AAAs, which are in nearly every region of the U.S., and avoidable health care use and spending for older adults. As hospitals, health care providers, and policymakers search for opportunities to improve health for high cost, high-need populations such as older adults with multiple chronic conditions, this research could offer evidence to support new solutions.Of particular practical value will be the collaboration with the Aging and Disability Business Institute (ADBI) for national dissemination efforts; ADBI is expressly designed to share capacity-building tools and resources with AAAs across the country.


Enhancing Caring Communities: Strategies to Help Locally Funded Senior Service Programs Better Support Caregivers

The Retirement Research Foundation
Principle Investigators: Robert Applebaum & Jennifer Heston-Mullins
June 2019 - May 2022

National and state programs that support caregivers assisting older people are limited. The lone federal program with dedicated funding to support caregivers, The National Family Caregiver Support Program, housed in the Administration for Community Living, had a 2016 budget of less than $160 million in comparison to $672 billion spent on Medicare (.2 of 1%). There are no federal policies on the horizon to support caregivers to elders with chronic disability. A number of states have taken a different path to generate resources necessary to support older people with disability who reside in the community: local tax levies. Although the local funding model has proven to be a successful political strategy that could expand to other states, these programs typically do not focus directly on caregiver support. In this work, our major purpose is to gain a better understanding of current approaches and to assist locally funded programs to better support caregivers as an intentional component of their strategy to support elders to remain independent in their communities.


Genetic Epidemiology of Ocular Health and Disease

The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, pass-through funds from the Department of Health and Human Services
Principal Investigator: Janardan Subedi
December 2015 - May 2020

An estimated 90% of the world’s visually impaired live in developing countries. The visually impaired are faced with lower independence and quality of life, and the costs associated with visual impairment place a huge economic and societal burden on families, communities, and nations. This project will use previous genetic research to examine eye-related traits and disorders with the Jirel people in eastern Nepal. It will provide new information on the genetic markers of eye-related traits and the genetic risk for eye diseases.


Implementing a Preference-Based, Person-Centered Communication Tool in Tennessee

Tennessee Department of Health
Principal Investigator: Katy Abbott

November 2019 - October 2020

The objective of this project is to offer training and support for a quality improvement initiative using a novel communication intervention among nursing home (NH) communities in TN. In addition, we seek to add a module to the current ComPASS system and perform usability tests with a small number of NH providers in order to make refinements to the software program.


Improving the Health of Older Adults Using Integrated Networks for Medical Care and Social Services

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a), pass-through funds from The John A. Hartford Foundation
Principle Investigator: Suzanne Kunkel
April 2019 - March 2022

With funding from The John A. Hartford Foundation, the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a) is creating and implementing a series of business acumen resources, trainings, learning collaboratives and consultancies to support the development of new lines of business, including contracting with health care providers, among the network of agencies servicing older adults and younger people with disabilities. Scripps Gerontology Center is contracting with n4a to evaluate the effectiveness and overall impact of the resources and interventions offered through this project.


Information and Planning: Understanding the Capacity of the Aging Network

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a), pass-through funds from the Department of Health and Human Services
Principal Investigator: Suzanne Kunkel
April 2016 - September 2020

For more than a decade, Scripps Gerontology Center has been working with n4a to collect information about, report on, and support the roles and activities of the Aging Network which is comprised of Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) and Tribal Organizations (TOs). In this round of funding the sixth comprehensive survey of these organizations will be conducted, culminating in presentations and reports focusing on the progress of the Aging Network over the past decade. Scripps works with n4a to identify and respond to their data needs based on the national surveys.


Long-Term Care Research

Ohio Department of Higher Education (formerly known as the Ohio Board of Regents)
Principal Investigator: Suzanne Kunkel
1988 - June 2021

The Ohio Long-Term Care Research Project was established by the legislature in 1988. The goal of this project is to provide information needed for effective planning, program development, and policy-making.

Resource:
Ohio Long-Term Care Research Project webpage


Lucas County Guardianship Services Assessment Proposal

Lucas County, Ohio
Principle Investigator: Amy Roberts
July 2019 - January 2020

This project involves an in-depth community assessment of guardianship services in Lucas County, Ohio to collect information about demand, resources available, and gaps in guardianship services. Additionally, the project will collect guardianship services information and best practices from other comparable-sized Ohio counties. The goal of the project is to provide guidance for the development of enhanced guardianship services in Lucas County.


Mapping Barriers to Community College Completion Among Older Learners: Identifying Malleable Factors to Improve Student Outcomes

U.S. Department of Education
Miami University Principal Investigator: Phyllis Cummins
July 2016 - June 2020

An increasing proportion of community college students are ages 25 and above yet little research has identified strategies and interventions to help them succeed. This mixed-methods research will analyze data from Ohio’s community colleges to propose interventions that facilitate successful outcomes for older students, especially the 40 to 64 age group.

Presentations:


A Mixed-Methods Study of Middle-Aged and Older Adults: Lifelong Learning, Skill Proficiencies, and Employment in the U.S. and Selected OECD Countries

U.S. Department of Education
Principal Investigator: Phyllis Cummins
July 2017 - June 2020

This research project will examine the relationships among skill proficiencies, employment, labor force participation, lifelong learning, and educational attainment for adults in the U.S. aged 40 to 74. U.S. results will be compared with several other countries. In addition, the project will examine lifelong learning and labor market policies in the U.S. and several other countries and interview key people in other countries.


Opening Minds through Art (OMA): An Intergenerational Art Program for People with Dementia

Kappa Kappa Gamma
Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Lokon

January 2011 - December 2019

In January 2011, the Kappa Kappa Kappa sorority adopted the Opening Minds through Art (OMA) program as their primary philanthropy project. For the past twelve semesters, members of the sorority got trained in attitudes and skills necessary to be effective OMA volunteers and OMA leaders in order to conduct the OMA program at the Oxford Community Adult Day Service site. The Oxford Community Adult Day Service is part of the Oxford Senior Citizen's Center. Each week, 8-12 sorority members serve 6-10 elders at the adult day center and facilitate the creative expression of these elders using the failure-free OMA methodology and visual arts projects. The program culminates in an annual art show and silent auction at the Oxford Community Arts Center.


Opening Minds through Art (OMA) II: A Quality Improvement Project

Ohio Department of Medicaid
Principal Investigator: Like Lokon 
October 2019 - June 2021

Opening Minds through Art (OMA) is an intergenerational art-making program for people with dementia and provides opportunities for creative self-expression and social engagement for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurocognitive disorders. The purpose of this project is to put OMA in more long-term care facilities in Ohio so that Ohio can serve as the national model for quality of care improvement through creative arts. Because OMA has been designated as a Quality Improvement Project by the Ohio Department of Aging, implementing OMA will meet nursing home licensing requirements. Thanks to funding from the Ohio Department of Medicaid, OMA will be offered at 36 additional nursing homes throughout Ohio by 2022.


Preference Based Living for People Living with Dementia in Ohio's Nursing Homes

Ohio Department of Medicaid
Principal Investigator: Katherine Abbott 
October 2019 - June 2021

Increasing the Preference-Based Care of People in Ohio’s Nursing Homes with a Special Focus on People Living with Dementia project is for all nursing home providers in Ohio who seek a sustainable way to provide preference-based, person-centered care. This project seeks to remediate a major barrier, expressed by 76% of Ohio providers, to providing preference-based care. Specifically, residents living with dementia who are unable to communicate their preferences. Individuals with cognitive impairment comprise half of all nursing home residents receiving Medicaid in Ohio. Therefore, remediating the barriers to preference assessment for individuals living with cognitive impairment in nursing homes is a critical need in Ohio and doing so is crucial to improving the quality of care for these residents.
In this project, we will build upon prior quality improvement materials to add a pragmatic audit trail for providers to track their process of Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory (PELI) assessment to the integration of preferences into care plans. We will develop and offer quality improvement projects (QIPs) that will focus on assessing preferences for people with moderate to severe dementia, as well as communicating those preferences across different care team members and shifts. We propose to develop materials from an evidence-based program for easy-to-use interventions that direct care staff can implement in their work with people living with dementia. We plan to augment the PELI assessment with visual cues to support individuals with dementia in expressing their preferences. Additionally, we will turn an existing in-person Leadership Communication Training into an on-line program that focuses on increasing care team members’ emotional intelligence to build relationships and enhance person-centered care. We will also develop and disseminate new education and training materials throughout the project in the form of newsletters, webinars and training videos. Finally, through a partnership with Linked Senior, we will scale up the mobile responsive Care Preference Assessment of Satisfaction (ComPASS-16) quality improvement website making it available to providers nation-wide.


System Factors and Racial Disparities in Nursing Home Quality of Life and Care

University of Minnesota, pass-through funds from National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities
Miami's Subcontract Principal Investigator: John Bowblis 
August 2016 - April 2021

Nursing homes with a higher proportion of minority residents tend to have lower quality, including quality of life. This project will examine how of life differs depending on the proportion of minority residents living in a nursing home. It will identify that cause these differences. It will also attempt to determine how much differences in quality of life can be improved if these factors are addressed.


Telomere Length Dynamics in Relation to Changes in Adiposity and Metaboilic Risk

University of Texas Health Science Center, pass-through funds from Department of Health and Human Services
Principal Investigator: Janardan Subedi
March 2019 - August 2020

Telomere length and telomerase activity have been posited as biomarkers for cellular aging, longevity, and age-related conditions such as cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Their role in the pathophysiology of chronic diseases, however, is still not well-defined, as they have been shown to also be influenced by adiposity. Moreover, information on the role of genetics in telomere biology is scarce. The objectives of the proposed study are to explore the phenotypic and genotypic relationship between body composition measures (e.g., obesity) and telomere length and telomerase activity, and to investigate the role of telomere length and telomerase activity on metabolic risk factors and disease in adults.
Using a longitudinal study design, we propose to measure serial leukocyte telomere length (LTL) from already existing stored (n=4204) and newly collected (n=885) buffy coat samples in 1794 Fels Longitudinal Study participants ranging in age from 18-93 years. Fels Longitudinal Study participants have been repeatedly measured over their entire lifetime for body composition and metabolic markers. Over time, more advanced measures of body composition such as visceral and subcutaneous abdominal adiposity using MRI, and novel blood chemistries such as inflammatory markers have been also been collected. Whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data are available on a large subset of these participants to search for genes influencing telomere biology. This uniquely valuable cohort presents a readily available, cost-effective, and powerful resource for understanding the relationship between telomere biology and cardiometabolic health.
The specific aims of the proposed study are: 1) to examine longitudinal associations between adiposity traits, telomere length, and metabolic risk in 1794 adults, 2) to examine cross-sectional relationships between newly collected telomerase activity, telomere length, adiposity traits, and metabolic risk factors in a subset (N=848) of participants, and 3) to identify genetic variants influencing telomere length and telomerase activity and to use Mendelian Randomization to examine causal associations among obesity, telomere biology and metabolic risk in a subset (N=1247) of study participants.
The results of this proposed study will provide important information about how telomere biology is linked to obesity, aging, and cardiometabolic disease risk. Further, this information will aid in the assessment of risk, prevention and treatment of accelerated aging and chronic disease.


TimeSlips Evaluation in Kentucky

TimeSlips Creative Storytelling, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Kathryn de Medeiros
January 2018 - December 2020

The purpose of this project is to evaluate the potential benefits to well-being for people with dementia in select nursing homes in Kentucky who are participating in the TimeSlips storytelling program for people living with dementia.


Recently completed projects

2016 Ohio Facility Family Satisfaction Surveys

Ohio Department of Aging
Principal Investigator: Jane Straker
May 2016 - June 2017

This project provides family satisfaction information for 969 nursing homes and 658 residential care facilities in Ohio. This important information is collected via a survey of resident’s family members. They are given the opportunity to share their opinions about the care and services where their family member or friend resides. The information from these surveys is grouped by facility and reported on Ohio's long-term care consumer guide at www.ltc.ohio.gov. Each facility also receives a report of their results to assist them in improving their care and services.


2018 Ohio Nursing Home and Residential Care Facility Satisfaction Surveys

Ohio Department of Aging
Principal Investigator: Jane Straker
February 2018 - June 2019

This project provides family satisfaction information for approximately 960 nursing homes and 700 residential care facilities in Ohio. This important information is collected via a survey of residents' family members. They are given the opportunity to share their opinions about the care and services where their family member or friend resides. The information from these surveys is grouped by and reported on Ohio's Long-term Care Consumer Guide. Each facility also receives a report of their results to assist them in improving their care and services.


Aging and Disability Business Institute Evaluation

National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a), pass-through funds from the John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Suzanne Kunkel
October 2016 - March 2019

The National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a) is creating and implementing a series of business tools and resources to support formal contracting arrangements between community-based organizations and the health care system. Scripps Gerontology Center is working with the n4a to evaluate the effectiveness and overall impact of the resources and interventions offered through this project.


Assessing Participant Satisfaction and Impact of Services Provided by the Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio

Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Jonathon Vivoda
June 2016 - June 2017

The primary goals of this study were to (1) understand overall participant satisfaction with services provided by the Area Office on Aging (AOoA) of Northwestern Ohio, via Lucas County senior centers, (2) assess satisfaction with services at the senior center level, and (3) identify the impact of those services on users. In particular, participants’ experiences with congregate meals, recreational activities, transportation, and supportive services were assessed. A telephone survey was conducted to contact participants and assess the research questions of the study.


Assessing Satisfaction and the Impact of Senior Center Services in Nine Northwestern Ohio Counties

Area Office on Aging of Northwestern Ohio, Inc.
Principal Investigator: Jonathon Vivoda
October 2017 - August 2018

This study will assessed overall satisfaction with services provided by senior centers and their impact on the lives of participants in nine counties in the Northwestern Ohio area. Satisfaction focused on congregate meals, recreation, transportation, and supportive services. The study also examined satisfaction and impact by county.


Evaluating Long-Term Services and Supports in Ohio

Ohio Department of Medicaid, pass-through from the Department of Health & Human Services
Principal Investigators: Suzanne Kunkel & Robert Applebaum
August 2017 - June 2018
September 2015 - June 2017

The number of older adults in Ohio with severe disabilities and most in need of long-term services and supports will increase over the next 15 years. Because of this challenge, Ohio has made progress in changing how it delivers long-term services. This project will evaluate the outcomes of a state initiative, No Wrong Door, which ensures that good information is an important first step in making sure that individuals with disabilities end up in the right place. It will also evaluate the use of enhanced housing coordinators to better integrate the acute and long-term services received by residents living in congregate housing.


Evaluation of AgeWell

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
Principal Investigators: Paul Flaspohler & Jane Straker
December 2016 - February 2018

The AgeWell program trains and employs able older adults to provide companionship to chronically ill older adults in the community. It aims to improve health and well-being outcomes by reducing isolation and identifying potential health or social problems and making referrals to the appropriate services. The program also hopes to decrease medical costs through reducing hospitalizations, hospital readmissions, and emergency room visits. The primary purpose of this project is to evaluate the implementation of the AgeWell pilot in Cleveland, Ohio. Other pilot sites currently underway include Limerick, Ireland and Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Resource:
Cleveland and Fort Lauderdale AgeWell Pilots Formative Evaluation Report: January 1, 2017-February 28, 2018


An Evaluation of Feasibility Studies and Applications for Renovation or Expansion of Continuing Care Retirement Communities

Towson University, pass through funds from The Maryland Department of Aging
Miami University Principal Investigator: Kathryn de Medeiros
January 2018 - June 2019

The purpose of this project is to provide expertise to the Maryland Department of Aging to evaluate proposals for new continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) as well as to evaluate the effectiveness of current CCRC communities. This project is in partnership with Towson University (Maryland.)


Evaluation Study of the Stark County Ohio Court Angels Guardian Visitor Program.

Stark County Probate Court
Principal Investigator: Amy Roberts
May 2018 - September 2018

This project is a formative evaluation of the Stark County Ohio Court Angels Guardian Visitor Program. Formative evaluations occur during project implementation and generally have the goal of improving the project’s design and performance. The deliverable will be a report that covers a process evaluation which includes a description of the program and its implementation, along with a summary of the administrative data being collected by the Court.


Honoring Individual Preferences When the Choice Involves Risk

The Mayer-Rothschild Foundation
Principal Investigator: Katherine Abbott
May 2017 - April 2018

Person-centered care emphasizes “knowing the person” and honoring each person’s preferences. The Scripps Gerontology Center and The Mayer-Rothschild Foundation are working together to develop and disseminate a training video, guide, and tip sheet based upon a person-centered care planning document developed by the Mayer-Rothschild Foundation. The training video will highlight how to plan nursing home residents’ care around what are perceived to be risky resident nursing home preferences, such as a resident who wishes to go outside unsupervised or choosing what to eat if the resident is on a special diet.


Incorporating the Preferences for Everyday Living into Ohio’s Nursing Homes to Improve Resident Care

Ohio Department of Medicaid
Principal Investigator: Katherine Abbott
July 2016 - June 2019

The Preferences for Everyday Living Inventory (PELI) is a tool used to assess nursing home residents’ preferences. It has been selected by the Ohio Department of Medicaid as one of five quality improvement indicators. This project will partner with nursing homes on ways to honor nursing home residents’ preferences for daily living. It will provide education and training for nursing homes on how to use information about residents’ preferences to guide care. The project will also evaluate the barriers to implementing this preference assessment and provide solutions for long-term sustainability.

Resource:
Preference Based Living website


Measuring the Impact of Social Workers on Psychosocial Functioning and Post-Acute Care Discharges

The Retirement Research Foundation
Principal Investigators: John Bowblis and Amy Roberts
January 2018 - January 2019

When older individuals on Medicare are hospitalized, nearly one in five will receive rehabilitative care in a skilled nursing facility (SNF) afterward. When these individuals first enter the SNF, they may have issues with psychosocial functioning, such as confusion, delirium, and depression, which may hinder their ability to be discharged back into the community. This project examines if social workers improve psychosocial functioning and SNF discharge outcomes. By improving discharge outcomes, it will determine if social workers play a critical role in helping SNF patients return to the community which may reduce costs to Medicare and Medicaid programs.


Ohio’s Combined WIOA Plan: Identifying Strategies and Supports to Improve Outcomes for Older Workers Phase Three

Ohio Department of Aging, pass-through funds from U.S. Department of Labor
Principal Investigator: Phyllis Cummins
February 2017 - June 2017

Scripps Gerontology Center has worked with the Ohio Department of Aging to develop a survey to measure the satisfaction of older adults who are receiving services at the Ohio Means Jobs Centers. This current project tested this survey at four Ohio Means Jobs Centers and will make recommendations to fully implement the survey at all Ohio Means Jobs Centers.


OH - What Matters Most

Ohio Department of Aging
Principal Investigator: Katherine Abbott, Kathryn McGrew
August 2015 - June 2017

This study builds upon the What Matters Most (WMM) guide developed for clients of Ohio’s Passport Medicaid waiver program. The goals are to 1) refine the WMM process (who gathers which info when; where is it stored; how is it accessed), 2) conceptualize and operationalize proximal outcomes, and 3) Develop and produce a one-hour training webinar. The goal of the webinar is to condense key WMM training points for sustained use of the WMM Guide over time.

Resource:
What Matters Most: A Guide for My Support and Care webpage


Opening Minds through Art: QIP Expansion 

Ohio Department of Medicaid
Principal Investigator: Elizabeth Lokon 
July 2016 - June 2019

Opening Minds through Art (OMA) is an intergenerational art-making program for people with dementia and provides opportunities for creative self-expression and social engagement for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other neurocognitive disorders. The purpose of this project is to put OMA in more long-term care facilities in Ohio so that Ohio can serve as the national model for quality of care improvement through creative arts. Because OMA has been designated as a Quality Improvement Project by the Ohio Department of Aging, implementing OMA will meet nursing home licensing requirements. Thanks to funding from the Ohio Department of Medicaid, OMA will be offered at 100 additional nursing homes throughout Ohio by 2019.

Resource:
Opening Minds through Art website


Our Family, Our Way: A Care Communication Tool for Aging Parents and Their Adult Children

The Retirement Research Foundation
Principal Investigator: Kathryn McGrew 
October 2016 - September 2017

This study will develop, implement, and evaluate a family-directed communication and planning toolkit to be used by families of older adults with chronic illness and/or disability. This intervention specifically focuses on community-dwelling aging parents and their adult children, including children-in-law and stepchildren. The goal is to facilitate more equitable care and support arrangements that reduce individual distress and improve perceived family competence about decision making and planning.


Person-Centered Staff Engagement Project

Ohio Department of Aging, pass-through from Department of Health and Human Services and the Ohio Department of Medicaid
Principal Investigator: Jane Straker
March 2017 - June 2019

This project will evaluate the impact of a program to improve care provided in Ohio nursing homes. Through focused training and support, 100 Ohio nursing homes will participate in a number of strategies to reduce staff turnover and thereby set the foundation for individualized and person-centered care. The evaluation will consider impacts on deficiencies, complaints, staff turnover and other measures.


Sages in Every Setting: Enhancing an Innovative Model to Incorporate Older Adult Voice into Research

Council for Jewish Elderly dba CJE SeniorLife, pass-through funds from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute
Principal Investigators: Katherine Abbott & Jane Straker
January 2018 - December  2019

This project aligns closely with the person-centered principles that underscore our inclusion of older adults as stakeholders and research participants, and our applied research on hearing the voices of older adults in the design and delivery of long-term services and supports.  Drs. Abbott and Straker will be participating on a nationwide advisory panel and developing two new Bureaus of Sages in Ohio nursing homes.


Tracking Long-Term Services Use in Ohio: July 2015 - June 2017

Ohio Department of Aging
Principal Investigators: Robert Applebaum, Shahla Mehdizadeh
July 2015 - June 2017

Over two decades, Scripps researchers have been tracking the use and costs of long-term services for Ohio's growing older population. Findings from this study are used to evaluate changes in state policy as Ohio has enacted reforms to respond to the increase in the older adult population.


Tracking Long-Term Services Use in Ohio: July 2017 - June 2019

Ohio Department of Aging
Principal Investigators: Robert Applebaum & Ian "Matt" Nelson
July 2017 - June 2019

Over two decades, Scripps researchers have been tracking the use and costs of long-term services and supports for Ohio's growing older population. This study provides policy-makers, providers and consumers with information to make good decisions to ensure that Ohio has an efficient and effective long-term care system. 


Xavier University Montessori Program for Dementia

Xavier University, pass-through funds from Joseph J. Schott Foundation
Miami's Principal Investigator: Jennifer Kinney
July 2015 - June 2017

With funding from the Harold Schott Foundation, we evaluated the implementation of Xavier University’s Montessori Dementia Program in dementia care units at two long-term care facilities. The intervention consisted of staff education on Montessori methods and incorporation of Montessori materials into the residents’ daily activities. The process evaluation identified successes and challenges/barriers to implementation, and the preliminary outcomes evaluation documented more engaged, less passive resident behavior after implementation of the Montessori program.