Current Undergraduate Literature Courses

Spring 2020

ENG 124A      Introduction to Fiction           

TR 11:40am- 1:00pm | BAC 112 | Squance, Joe

Study of basic characteristics (narrative design, character, point of view, style, and tone) and essential forms (short-short story, story, novella, and novel) of the genre of literary fiction. IIB. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 125A      Introduction to Drama

TR 10:05am-11:25am | UPH 262 | Johnson, Kathleen

Critical analysis of dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks to modern performance art, using dramatic structure and theory to read play texts as productions of their cultural contexts. IIB. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 129A      Books You Need to Read      

TR 1:15pm- 2:35pm | BAC 108 | Kuhajda, Casey

Introduction to Literature through formal analysis of major works by authors such as William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Mark Twain, and Toni Morrison. Designed for non-majors. IIB. CAS-B.  

ENG 134A      Introduction to Shakespeare  

MW 1:15pm- 2:35 pm  | UPH 167 | Bromley, James

Introduction to Shakespeare's works. Gives students who are new to collegiate-level literary studies an overview of the range of Shakespeare's works and the variety of approaches to those works. IIB. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 231A      The Short Story         

TR 1:15pm- 2:35pm | BAC 112 | Fisher, William

Study of the short story as a literary genre with its own unique conventions. Examples from both early and present-day masters. CAS-B-LIT. 

ENG 232A      Women Writers: English Women Writers Before 1700       

MW 2:50pm- 4:10pm | IRV 002 | Bromley, James

Introduction to women's writing in English. Readings may include poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction by women writers from various historical periods and national traditions. IC. CAS-B-LIT. Cross-listed with WGS 232.

ENG 236A      Experimental Film     

W 4:25pm- 7:05pm | UPH 389 | Edwards, Erin

This course examines influential works and movements in experimental film, emphasizing filmmakers for whom the conventional entertainment narrative is an object of radical investigation. Working outside the traditions of commercial film, experimental filmmakers take alternative approaches not only to narrative but also to visual representation, sound production, and editing, often exploiting new or unconventional technologies to achieve their effects. The course will also consider critical and theoretical perspectives, situating the unconventional techniques of experimental film in relation to broader aesthetic, cultural, historical, and political contexts. Cross-listed with FST 236.

ENG 249A      Asian and Asian American Cinema  

TR 10:05am-11:25am | UPH 389 | Jayasena, Nalin

Explores films in the contexts of Western colonial influences and legacies in Asia and Asian America. Students will learn how mainstream notions of nation, gender, sexuality, family values, social hierarchies and social change are constructed at the intersection of the audience, visual imagery, political, and economic contexts. We will also explore the role alternative cinema plays in challenging mainstream forms of knowledge production with the overall goal of critically evaluating how cinema creates, recreates, perpetuates and reproduces "Asian" cultures for global and local audiences. IC, IIB, IIIB. CAS-B-Humanities. Cross-listed with ENG/FST.

ENG 251A      Introduction to European Literature  

WF 1:15pm- 2:35pm | BAC 346 | Klestinec, Cynthia

Introduction to the masterpieces of European literature, its creation stories, its epic heroes and heroines, its infamous loves and equally infamous deaths. From these literary works, you will gain a sense of the variety of human experiences across time and cultures and broaden your understanding of literary purpose. IIB, IIIB. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 262A      Children's Literature  

TR 10:05am-11:25am | UPH 163 | Austin, Sara

ENG 262B      Children's Literature  

TR 1:15pm- 2:35pm | UPH 365 | Austin, Sara

Broad study of children's books, with emphasis on acquiring skill to evaluate children's literature. Practice in the literary analysis of prose and poetry with emphasis on the impact of good literature for children. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 263A      Literature & Medicine           

MW 10:05am-11:25am | BAC 337 | Melley, Timothy

Medicine and literature have a long standing history. Aristotle’s own poetics made use of the medical term, catharsis. Even today, the diagnosis of symptoms is akin to the careful reading of a text; and the experience of (mental and physical) illness is shaped by storytelling as patients seek to convey their lived experience and by technologies that mediate that experience. This course focuses on texts that reflects medical experiences from the perspective of individual patients, practitioners and in the case of epidemics, societies. It uses reading, writing, thinking and discussion of those texts to investigate the different perspectives and belief systems that come into play in medical contexts, addressing issues of medical authority, end (quality) of life, the role of genre and technology in mediating the experience of illness, and the ways in which structural inequities in discourses of health are perpetuated. IIB, IC. CAS-B.

ENG 275A      American Literature to 1900 

TR 10:05am-11:25am | BAC 346 | Navakas, Michele

Introduction to American Literature written from the colonial period through 1900. The course considers a multiplicity of voices as expressed in literary texts. IIB. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 276A      American Literature after 1900         

MW 11:40am- 1:00pm | BAC 108 | Chandler, Justin

Introduction to American Literature and its cultural contexts written from 1900 to the present. IIB. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 298A      Introduction to Literary and Cultural Study  

TR 11:40am- 1:00pm | UPH 131 | Jayasena, Nalin

Introductory skill-based course to be taken within one semester after declaring literature major. Covers critical and interpretive terms and basic concepts of literary genre; develops skills of close reading, interpretation, and critical analysis; provides instructions in techniques of research and citation; and introduces various critical methods and approaches. ADVW. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 298C      Introduction to Literary and Cultural Study  

TR 1:15pm- 2:35pm | BAC 346| Navakas, Michele

Introductory skill-based course to be taken within one semester after declaring literature major. Covers critical and interpretive terms and basic concepts of literary genre; develops skills of close reading, interpretation, and critical analysis; provides instructions in techniques of research and citation; and introduces various critical methods and approaches. ADVW. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 327A      Medieval Literature   

TR 11:40am- 1:00pm | UPH 258 | Murphy, Patrick

Study of English literature from Beowulf to the poetry of Dunbar, especially in translation. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 337A      African American Writing 1878-1945          

MW 10:05am-11:25am | BAC 346 | Dunning, Stefanie

Despite the optimism occasioned by the fall of slavery, the years covered in this course are known as the era of Jim Crow, which was not characterized by the triumphs of a newly freed people welcomed by a repentant nation. Instead, black experience at this time is marked by the rise of the KKK, the epidemic of lynching, and the introduction of segregation into American society. This course considers the issues faced by these new American citizens—former slaves historically understood to be chattel and only three-fifths human—and how they strove, in their writing, to express and shape their identity and destiny. Crosslisted with BWS 337. IC. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 338A      African American Writing 1946-present       

TR 10:05am-11:25am | BAC 143 | Johnson, Cheryl

Considers the relationship among literature, freedom, and racial identity as a major preoccupation of black intellectuals and writers, from slave narratives to current post-modern and hip-hop narratives. Black writers give special attention to the significance of race in literature, but does racial identity give a writer a special task as well as perspective? Is a black writer one who happens to be black or does his/her blackness obligate and/or empower this writer to write from a black perspective? And, is this perspective inevitable given the writer’s racial experiences in this country? IC. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 338B      African American Writing 1946-present       

TR 11:40am- 1:00pm | BAC 143 | Johnson, Cheryl

Considers the relationship among literature, freedom, and racial identity as a major preoccupation of black intellectuals and writers, from slave narratives to current post-modern and hip-hop narratives. Black writers give special attention to the significance of race in literature, but does racial identity give a writer a special task as well as perspective? Is a black writer one who happens to be black or does his/her blackness obligate and/or empower this writer to write from a black perspective? And, is this perspective inevitable given the writer’s racial experiences in this country? IC. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 339A      British Romanticism  

TR 10:05am-11:25am | UPH 167 | Jennings, Collin

Intensive interdisciplinary study of imaginative representations of the encounters between "Asia" and "America," broadly conceived, particularly the entangled relations among their diverse constituencies in the contexts of colonialism and globalization. Key topics include feminist critique of gendered violence and human rights issues; Euro-American militarism and sex tourism; the emergence of new categories of sex, gender, and kinship as lived experiences mediated by transnational consumer culture and institutional structures; masculinity and Asian diasporic nationalisms; pan-Asian movements against racism, colonialism, and neoliberalism both in Asia and the U.S.; and the emergence of new critical, artistic and aesthetic practices. IC. Cross-listed with AAA/WGS.

ENG 351A      Gender and Sexuality in Asian/America       

MW 10:05am-11:25am | BAC 138 | Mannur, Anita

Intensive interdisciplinary study of imaginative representations of the encounters between "Asia" and "America," broadly conceived, particularly the entangled relations among their diverse constituencies in the contexts of colonialism and globalization. Key topics include feminist critique of gendered violence and human rights issues; Euro-American militarism and sex tourism; the emergence of new categories of sex, gender, and kinship as lived experiences mediated by transnational consumer culture and institutional structures; masculinity and Asian diasporic nationalisms; pan-Asian movements against racism, colonialism, and neoliberalism both in Asia and the U.S.; and the emergence of new critical, artistic and aesthetic practices. IC. Cross-listed with AAA/WGS.

ENG 370A      Literary and Cultural Theory 

TR 10:05am-11:25am | BAC 114 | Hebard, Andrew

Surveys significant movements in recent critical theory, such as formalism, structuralism and poststructuralism, psychoanalysis, Marxism and historicism, feminism, race and ethnic studies, gay and lesbian studies, and cultural studies. Attention also given to applying particular methods to one or to several literary texts. May be repeated once for credit when content changes. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 373A      Shakespeare: Late Works      

TR 10:05am-11:25am | UPH 127 | Peterson, Kaara

Intensive study of Shakespeare's late-career plays, primarily focused on the "problem plays," late tragedies, and romances, with some attention to stage performance during the golden age of early modern English theater in London. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 386A      Studies in Drama & Performance: Performing the Nation   

TR 1:15pm- 2:35pm | UPH 361 | Johnson, Kathleen 

Examine conventions and traditions in a variety of dramatic forms, such as tragedy, naturalism, expressionism, comedy, the musical, performance art, and the performance of everyday life. Studies also include performance practices such as realism, minstrelsy, drag, distanciation, or devised theatre, with attention to trends and evolving and contested definitions of the genres and the stakes of embodiment and theatrical staging. Course topic varies by section. IC. CAS-B.

ENG 387A      Studies in Poetry        

WF 11:40am- 1:00pm | UPH 229 | Cheek, Cris

Examines conventions and traditions in a variety of poetry. Course topic varies by section. CAS-B-LIT.

ENG 432A      Feminism & the Diaspora     

M 1:15pm- 3:55pm | SHD 9 | Brown, Tammy

Concerns issues of language, history, geography, social-psychology, and culture for U.S. women of color (black, Asian-American, Latina, American Indian, and others). Includes works by and about women on gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality, and other differences. IC. Cross-listed with BWS/WGS.

ENG 437A      Black Feminist Theory          

TR 2:50-4:10 | BAC 254 | Johnson, Cheryl

This course examines critical and theoretical issues in black feminism from slavery to the present. One of the central goals of the course is to interrogate race, gender, class, and sexuality in the context of black women's thoughts and experiences. The class will read, discuss and analyze a wide variety of texts including critical essays, films, selected fiction, print and visual media. IC. Cross-listed with BWS/WGS.

ENG 440AA   Major Writers: Margaret Atwood      

WF 10:05am-11:25am | BAC 108 | Edwards, Erin 

ENG 450PA    English Detective Fiction      

TR 11:40am- 1:00pm | UPH 269 | Peterson, Kaara

ENG 495DA   Capstone: What is the Future? Black Time, Afro-futurism & the Surrealist Elsewhere      

MW 11:40am- 1:00pm | BAC 138 | Dunning, Stefanie