Annual Address

1

2

[3]

4

5

6

Gregory P. Crawford
October 23, 2019

Finally, a big congratulations to our Miami RedHawks! They won the Mid-American Athletics Conference awards, Jacoby and Rees, for women’s and men’s sports, both in the same year, for the first time in Miami history. They won the Carol Cartwright Award for athletic success while demonstrating academic excellence, volunteerism, and good citizenship. It’s the first time in MAC history that a school has won all three in the same year. RedHawks engage campus on many fronts: hiring and developing student interns; extensive collaborations with our College of Education, Health and Society; and honoring those on campus with a passion for community, diversity, and inclusive excellence.

What a year it has been. We celebrated our 50th Anniversary in Luxembourg with more than 700 alumni making the trip; We celebrated our 50th Anniversary of the interdisciplinary Institute for Environment and Sustainability; We won the Abernathy International Town Gown Award with the City of Oxford for building a healthy community; We were honored with the prestigious Simon Award for our International efforts.

We were awarded the Opportunities for Ohioans with Disabilities Employer Partner of Inclusion Gold Award; Miami Alum and Trustee, Mike Armstrong, was honored by CASE for higher education philanthropy; Miami Orchestra took over Music Hall in Cincinnati premiering Professor Glen Roger Davis’ Concerto in F; and keep a look out for the upcoming article on Clinical Lecturer of Educational Psychology, Professor Ashley Johnson, in Ohio Magazine on her work on inclusive and socially just practices. I wish I had the time to cite the accomplishments of each of our community members. Thanks to all for an incredible year for Miami University.

Let me now pivot to our future. We have much to look forward to at Miami University even in the face of challenges and headwinds facing higher education in our state and nation overall.

We are in the midst of massive, accelerated change unprecedented in human history – the Industrial Revolution 4.0. Artificial intelligence and algorithms, advanced materials nanocircuits, and rapid prototyping are empowering advances from sustainable energy and carbon footprint reduction to biotechnology’s proteomics, genomics, neuroscience and personalized medicine. It is difficult to predict the future, but we know it will not look anything like the present or the past. In this dynamic environment, universities, like other organizations, must adapt to thrive.

That’s what we’re doing at Miami.

Higher education is about ensuring that students are ready for successful and satisfying lives and careers. Modern university graduates will live and work in a radically different environment from the one for which most educational structures were built. The future, and the university’s role in it, provoke impassioned debate these days. You’ve seen the headlines: Will 85 percent of the 2030 workforce really be in jobs that don’t exist today? Will 25 percent of jobs be lost to robots and machines? Will online and remote education replace brick-and-mortar campuses like online shopping has impacted retail? , Will half of all universities fail before 2030?

Amid the debate, there is consensus on key issues that will define our future. The world will be more connected. Transdisciplinarity, analytics, and critical thinking will be more vital. Communities will be more sustainable. There will be more robots, algorithms, and technology – more disruption and change in our lives and markets. Dialogue will be more intense. Sharply divergent ideas will require greater individual character and interpersonal skill to achieve cooperation, synthesis, and peace.

We must transform the way we deliver education and provide opportunity. We need more experiential learning and more transdisciplinary and boundaryless education to prepare graduates for this dynamic world. We need more continuous learning across life for jobs that are no longer blue collar or white collar BUT “new” collar. We must be agents of change, not its victims. Miami is well-positioned for this future – through our creativity, imagination, agility, broad curriculum, and our forward-thinking culture.

Today I want to talk about three ways we are creating our future:

(1) how we are building a dynamically-poised institution, (2) how we are working across the campus to implement our strategic vision for the future, and (3) our push to create a transformative university that ties our vision together.

FIRST Dynamically-poised institution

We have become a more agile institution. We are ready to embrace change, to move fast, to pivot in new directions when needed, and to retain our position of leadership in the academy. We will do this without abandoning the core, traditional values that make Miami special.

We have developed a six-fold strategy: 1. Agility-focused budgeting for fast response to emerging financial challenges. 2. Change-focused investment to steer significant resources where they can make the most impact. 3. Academic-focused philanthropy to elevate our resources for student need and scholarship. 4. Future-focused leadership readiness to prepare our talented faculty and staff for the challenges of academic leadership. 5. Pull-focused, partnership-oriented innovation that brings others’ intellectual property to campus for development by our faculty and students. 6. Continuously-focused planning so that we are always developing strategy, NOT just once every five years. Let me comment on some of these.

1

2

[3]

4

5

6