Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy

Contact Information

photo of Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy7 MacMillan Hall
Oxford, OH 45056
(513) 529-7528
godeano@MiamiOH.edu

Title

Associate Teaching Professor
Global and Intercultural Studies (American Studies)

Education

PhD, University of Bucharest, Romania
MA, University of Bucharest, Romania
BA, University of Craiova, Romania

Teaching

Dr. Godeanu-Kenworthy teaches classes on popular culture, food and globalization, on transnationalism and belonging in literature and film, and on political ideologies in film and contemporary American and Canadian fiction, as well as a study abroad workshop about the American presence in Berlin during the Cold War.

She is the recipient of a 2018-19 Fulbright U.S. Scholar Grant to Romania, teaching in the American Studies Department at University of Bucharest.

Research

Oana Godeanu-Kenworthy's work on American and Canadian literature and on European film has been published in Early American Literature, Early American Studies, The Journal of Commonwealth Literature, The Journal of Postcolonial Writing, and the Journal of European Studies.

Her article "Creole Frontiers: Settler Ambiguities in the Work of John Richardson's and James Fenimore Cooper's Fiction" (2014) earned the 2015 Richard Beale Prize which honors the best article published in Early American Literature in a publishing year.

Godeanu-Kenworthy is the 2007 recipient of the Best Doctoral Dissertation Award, granted by the International Council for Canadian Studies for her thesis on Britishness and belonging in early Canadian writing.

She was a 2011-12 Kluge Postdoctoral Fellow at the Library of Congress in Washington DC for a research project on the impact of political ideologies in early nineteenth-century North American fiction. Godeanu-Kenworthy was also a 2006 visiting postdoctoral fellow at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe-University in Frankfurt, Germany, and a graduate fellow at the Institute for Canadian Studies, in Ottawa, Canada (2005), at the Central European University in Budapest, Hungary (2004), and at the JFK Institute for North American Studies in Berlin, Germany (2003).

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