Employer Satisfaction and Completer Persistence in Profession

Employer Satisfaction: To gather information on the quality of preparation provided by their educator preparation providers, the Ohio Department of Higher Education distributes a survey to employers of Ohio educators. Questions on the survey are aligned with Ohio's Learning Standards, Ohio licensure requirements, and elements of national accreditation. A total of 141 respondents completed the survey statewide. (Scale: 1=Strongly Disagree 2=Disagree 3=Agree 4=Strongly Agree.)

Employer Perceptions of Ohio EPP Programs Survey Results
Item No. Question Institution Average State
Average
1 The institution prepares its graduates to understand student learning and development. 3.50 3.39
2 The institution prepares its graduates to respect the diversity of the students they teach. 3.39 3.43
3 The institution prepares its graduates to know and understand the content area for which they have instructional responsibility. 3.56 3.45
4 The institution prepares its graduates to understand and use content-specific instructional strategies to effectively teach the central concepts and skills of the discipline. 3.44 3.35
5 The institution prepares its graduates to be knowledgeable about assessment types, their purposes, and the data they generate 3.33 3.22
6 The institution prepares its graduates to analyze data to monitor student progress and learning. 3.28 3.12
7 The institution prepares its graduates to use data to plan, differentiate, and modify instruction. 3.33 3.13
8 The institution prepares its graduates to align their instructional goals and activities with school and district priorities. 3.39 3.23
9 The institution prepares its graduates to differentiate instruction to support the learning needs of all students. 3.28 3.20
10 The institution prepares its graduates to treat students fairly and establish an environment that is respectful, supportive, and caring. 3.56 3.47
11 The institution prepares its graduates to maintain an environment that is conducive to learning for all students. 3.39 3.42
12 The institution prepares its graduates to communicate clearly and effectively. 3.61 3.38
13 The institution prepares its graduates to collaborate effectively with other teachers, administrators, and district staff. 3.56 3.38
14 The institution prepares its graduates to understand, uphold, and follow professional ethics, policies, and legal codes of professional conduct. 3.61 3.45
15 The institution prepares its graduates to assume responsibility for professional growth. 3.44 3.34

Source:Ohio Educator Preparation Provider Performance Report Miami University (PDF)

Employment in Ohio Public Schools: Employment, license, and teacher value added data of Miami University graduates were obtained from the Ohio Department of Higher Education Metrics Reporting System (i.e., metrics data) and used to conduct this analysis. With consideration of incompleteness of metrics data, only employment data in school year 2015–2016, 2016–2017, and 2017–2018, teacher resident educator (RE) and principal license data in effective years 2015, 2016, and 2017 and teacher value-added data in school year 2016–2017 and 2017–2018 were used. Since teacher license data can be publicly accessed through Ohio Department of Education (ODE) website (i.e., ODE staff data), we pulled out Miami graduates’ license data in effective years 2012–2014 from the ODE staff data by using the list of teachers from metrics by license effective year.


Miami Students with License effective in 2015 and Employed in School Year 2015-2016, 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 in Ohio by License Type, 2015-2016, 2016-2017 and 2017-2018
License Effective in 2015 Stayed in Ohio from SY 2015-2016 to 2016-2017 Stayed in Ohio from SY 2015-2016 to 2017-2018 Total
n % n % N
Early Childhood (P-3) 41 95% 38 88% 43
Middle Childhood (4-9) 22 92% 18 75% 24
Adolescence to Young Adult (7-12) 22 96% 21 91% 23
Multi Age (P-12) 18 95% 16 84% 19
Intervention Specialist 18 82% 17 77% 22
Total 121 92% 110 84% 131

Note: This analysis was based on teachers' inclusion in employment data sets for SY 2015-2016, 2016-2017, and 2017-2018. Data in this table reflect the number of educator licenses not the number of educators. Educators may hold more than one valid license.

Miami Students with License Effective in 2016 and Employed in School Year 2016-2017 and 2017-2018 in Ohio by License Type, 2016-2017 and 2017-2018
License Effective in 2016 Stayed in Ohio from SY 2016-2017 to 2017-2018 Total
n % N
Early Childhood (P-3) 42 91% 46
Middle Childhood (4-9) 29 97% 30
Adolescence to Young Adult (7-12) 28 90% 31
Multi Age (P-12) 15 88% 17
Intervention Specialist (K-12) 29 100% 29
Total 143 93% 153