Paul Branscum

Paul BranscumAssociate Professor

Phillips Hall, 202P
513-529-3022
branscpw@MiamiOH.edu

Degrees:
Ph.D. University of Cincinnati
M.S., The Ohio State University
B.S., The Ohio State University

Curriculum Vitae

Courses Taught

  • KNH 218 Applied Health Behavior Change
  • KNH 462/562 Public Health Program Planning and Evaluation
  • KNH 611 Behavioral Approaches to Health Promotion and Education

Research Interests

As a health promotion and public health scholar, my mission is to enhance the quality of life of individuals in the communities surrounding us, so that we can all live healthy and prosperous lives. This is best achieved through systematic planning, implementation and evaluation of public health programs, which is the common thread that describes my teaching, research and service activities. My research mainly focuses on predicting and changing obesogenic health behaviors using theory-based approaches. Such research is critical for planning public health programs, because it helps inform decisions for practice by identifying modifiable targets for health behavior change. Additionally, my research has focused on implementing, and evaluating public health interventions by utilizing process and impact evaluations. I believe both of these issues are vital in understanding the efficacy and effectiveness of our public health programs, and will ultimately help us answer questions about interventions such as: What works? When does it work? And with whom does it work best? 

Specific areas of interest for my research include:

  • Predicting and changing obesogenic health behaviors among children, parents and young adults
  • Childhood Obesity Prevention
  • Nutrition
  • Theories and Techniques of Behavior Change
  • Measurement issues related to Attitudes, Perceived Norms, and Perceived Behavioral Control 
  • Instrument/Survey Development and Validation

Recent Publications

Books

  1. Sharma, M., & Branscum, P. (2020). Introduction to community and public health. (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.
  2. 2. Sharma, M., & Branscum, P. (2020). Foundations of mental health promotion. (2nd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett.

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

  1. Dobbs, P. D., Branscum, P., Jozkowski, K. N., Hammig, B., Henry, J., Lo, W., Gorman, D., Luzius, A. (in press). College students’ underlying beliefs about using e-cigarettes: an application of the reasoned action approach. Addiction Research & Theory
  2. Dobbs, P. D., Branscum, P., Wilkerson, A. (in press). E-cigarette use among young adults to quit smoking: an application of the reasoned action approach. American Journal of Health Education.
  3. Gwin, S., Branscum, P., Taylor, L., Cheney, M., Maness, S., Frey, M. & Zhang, Y. (in press). Associations between depressive symptoms and religiosity in young adults. Journal of Religion and Health.
  4. Smith, P., & Branscum, P. (in press). Feasibility, utility, and limitations of a rapid community behavioral diagnosis for social distancing during the 2020-coronavirus pandemic. American Journal of Health Promotion.
  5. Fairchild, G., & Branscum, P. (2020). Gender differences for theory-based determinants of muscle strengthening physical activity: a moderation analysis. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 10(3), 781-791.
  6. Bhochhibhoya, A., & Branscum, P. (2020). Beyond one size fits all: predicting binge and social drinking behavior. American Journal of Health Studies, 35(1), 57-72.
  7. Branscum, P. (2020). Developing and validating an instrument to evaluate theory-based behavioral antecedents of consuming a high fiber diet. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 17(12), 1-13.
  8. Branscum, P., & Lora, K. (2020). Determinants of parenting practices related to monitoring sugar sweetened beverages among Hispanic mothers. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health, 22(1), 120-125.
  9. Branscum, P., Lora, K., & Hernandez, D. (2020). Examining determinants and co-associations between fruit and vegetable and sugar-sweetened beverage monitoring practices among a sample of low-income Hispanic mothers: A Reasoned Action Approach. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 7(4), 650-659.
  10. Branscum, P., & Patricio-Agosto, N. (2020). How children search for health information online: an observational study. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 52(5), 522-527.
  11. Branscum, P., & Qualls Fay, K. (2020). What determines young adults’ attitudes, perceived norms, and perceived behavioral control towards healthy sleep behaviors? A Reasoned Action Approach. Health Behavior Research, 2(4), 1-12.
  12. Branscum, P., Qualls Fay, K., & Senkowski, V. (2020). Do different factors predict the adoption and maintenance of healthy sleep behaviors? A Reasoned Action Approach. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 10(1), 78-86.
  13. Gowin, M., Maness, S., Larson, D., Branscum, P., & Cheney, M. (2020). Conducting qualitative research in hard-to- reach young adults using online recruitment and interviewing. SAGE Research Methods Cases, 10.4135/9781529741032.
  14. Gwin, S., Branscum, P., Taylor, L., Cheney, M., Maness, S., Frey, M., & Zhang, Y. (2020). The relationship between parent-young adult religious concord and depression. Journal of Spirituality in Mental Health, 22(1), 96-110.
  15. Wright, L., Maness, S., Branscum, P., Larson, D., Taylor, E. L., Mayeux, L., & Cheney, M. (2020). Pastors’ perceptions of the black church’s role in teen pregnancy prevention. Health Promotion Practice, 21(3)344-354.
  16. Branscum, P., & Fairchild, G. (2019). Differences in determinants of aerobic and muscle strengthening physical activity: a Reasoned Action Approach. Journal of Sports Sciences, 37(1), 90-99.
  17. Branscum, P., & Senkowski, V. (2019). Does level of specificity impact measures of motivation to comply? A randomized evaluation. Translational Behavioral Medicine, 9(2), 373–379.
  18. Dong, Y., & Branscum, P. (2019). What motivates people to get obesity related direct-to-consumer genetic tests? a reasoned action approach. American Journal of Health Education, 50(6), 356–365.
  19. Larson, D.J., Wetherbee, J.C., & Branscum, P. (2019). CrossFit athletic identity and sponsorship recall, recognition, and purchase intent. International Journal of Kinesiology and Sports Science, 7(3), 6-15.
  20. Lora, K., Branscum, P., Chen, S., & Wakefield, D. (2019). Home food environment factors associated with Hispanic preschoolers’ intake of fruits and vegetables. Family and Community Health, 42(4), 261-270.
  21. Senkowski, V., Gannon, C., & Branscum, P. (2019). Behavior change techniques used in Theory of Planned Behavior physical activity interventions amongst the elderly population: a systematic review. Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, 27, 746-754.
  22. Wright, L., Branscum, P., Maness, S., Larson, D., Taylor, E. L., Mayeux, L., & Cheney, M. (2019). Parents' beliefs of the black church's role in teen pregnancy prevention. Journal of Adolescence, 72(2019), 52-63.

Recent Grants

Joyce Barnes Farmer Distinguished Guest Professorship grant for funds to support a visit from Dr. James Prochaska to Miami University (2020), funded by Miami University, College of Education, Health and Society, $10,000.00.
Role: Principal Investigator.

Grant for funds to support the project Developing and validating an instrument to evaluate behavioral antecedents tailored to the Full Plate Living Weight Loss Program (2018-2020), funded by the Ardmore Institute of Health, $49,852.00.
Role: Principal Investigator.

Research Seed Grant for funds to support the project Examining E-Cigarette Use in College Students (2018-2019), funded by Miami University, College of Education, Health and Society, $5000.00.
Role: Co-Investigator.

Grant for funds to support the project Using a taxonomy of behavior change techniques to map the FullPlate program (2017-2018), funded by the Ardmore Institute of Health, $17,000.00.
Role: Principal Investigator.

Summer Research grant for funds to support the project Value-Laden Multipliers of Normative Beliefs in Value Expectancy Models: An Exploration of Best Practices for Evaluation Across Multiple Health Behaviors (2017-2018), funded by Miami University, College of Education, Health and Society, $6000.00.
Role: Principal Investigator.

Joyce Barnes Farmer Distinguished Guest Professorship grant for funds to support a visit from Dr. Icek Ajzen to Miami University to give the workshop Working with the Theory of Planned Behavior (2017), funded by Miami University, College of Education, Health and Society, $4900.00.
Role: Principal Investigator.

In the News

New Series of Rox the Fox Comic Books Promote Public Health

Even though we have a better understanding of what's healthy. And what's not. Improving public health is still tremendously difficult. Because changing attitudes and behaviors is never easy. After all, how do you get people to first pay attention to accurate and relevant information, and then actually get them to do something about it?

So in this episode, we'll hear about how a local community is making a calculated and creative public health initiative to try and communicate the right message, to the right audience, at the right time.

Helping Kids Avoid Sugar-Sweetened Beverages

For many of us, drinking sugar-sweetened beverages is a daily ritual. But many public health professionals are now showing a growing concern over the consumption of these drinks, especially when it comes to children.

On this episode, two public health researchers discuss the changing cultural trends around how we consume and view sugar-sweetened beverages, as well as how parents can help their children make more healthier choices.