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Miami University

Department of Nursing Graduate Nursing Student Handbook 2022 - 2023

Table of Contents

About the Graduate Nursing Student Handbook

We welcome you to the graduate nursing program at Miami University! This handbook for graduate nursing students provides information regarding policies, procedures, available resources, and issues that are of concern to student academic life. It also outlines rights and responsibilities of the graduate nursing students. Students are responsible for using the handbook as a resource when questions arise and as a guide to academic and nonacademic policies and procedures. This handbook is to be used in conjunction with the Graduate School Handbook and and the Miami Student Handbook, and Miami University publications and policies.

All students are required to sign the Handbook Certification document and upload it to their Castlebranch account.

In the Handbook Certification document, students certify that they are responsible for:

  • Reading the handbook in its entirety
  • Reviewing and understanding any changes made to the Handbook during the entire time they are enrolled as a student in the Department of Nursing
  • Recognizing that changes made to policies and procedures may impact them as a student. Note that the information in this handbook is updated annually. Changes may also be made throughout the academic year. Students will be notified of any changes to the handbook via e-mail to their @miamioh.edu address. The information in this handbook is accurate as of August 2022.

Department of Nursing

Graduate Program Mission

To cultivate nurse leaders who are highly-skilled in the translation of evidence to excellence, quality and systems improvement, and collaborative partnerships for health equity, who will lead in the transformation of healthcare to improve health within our diverse global society.

Graduate Program Vision

To create nurse leaders who will lead in the transformation of healthcare to reduce disparities and improve the health and well-being of the global society.

Graduate Program Values

  • Leadership
  • Integrity
  • Excellence
  • Caring
  • Collaboration

Diversity and Inclusion The graduate nursing program affirms the guiding principles and values as outlined in the Diversity and Inclusion Statement for Miami University.

Diversity and Inclusion Statement for Miami University.

Academic Calendar 2022 – 2023

Fall 2022

Fall 2022
Aug 22 Classes begin
Sept 5 Labor Day, no classes
Oct 7 - 9 Fall break, no classes
Nov 23 - 27 Thanksgiving Break, no classes
Dec 2 Classes end
Dec 5 - 9 Final exam week

Spring 2022

Spring 2022
Jan 23 Classes begin
Mar 20 - 26 Spring Break
May 5 Classes end
May 8 - 12 Final Exam Week

Summer 2023

Summer 2023
May 16 Classes begin
May 29 Memorial Day, no classes
Jul 4 Independence Day, no classes
Note: Last day of class will vary depending on course

Master of Science in Nursing Program

Miami University Master’s of Science in Nursing (MSN) program offers two tracks of study: Family Nurse Practitioner, and Nurse Executive Leadership. These MSN program tracks will prepare nurses for key leadership roles in complex healthcare systems, in nursing education, and in advanced practice provider roles. Graduates will be prepared to contribute to and lead the US healthcare system to transition to new models of care with an emphasis on population health, preventative health and chronic disease management.

Each MSN track will have the respective designation on the student’s transcript and diploma. Courses will be delivered in an online format; however, each track will have one on-campus workshop requirement lasting two days mid-program.

MSN Program Outcomes

  1. Translate and integrate knowledge to inform the practice of nursing, including expert judgment in practice
  2. Synthesize understanding of effective organizational and systems leadership and interprofessional collaboration in complex systems of practice
  3. Apply principles and methods of quality and safety science, nursing science, and evidence-based practice as an integral aspect of nursing
  4. Use informatics and emerging technologies to manage and improve nursing practice, advocating for system level improvement in health and healthcare
  5. Collaborate with interprofessional partners including team members, patients, and communities to optimize care, enhance the experience for stakeholders, improve outcomes, and reduce costs
  6. Synthesize understanding of equitable population health outcomes
  7. Analyze components of person-centered care for individuals, families and communities including individual to systems interventions targeting positive health outcomes
  8. Synthesize ethics and values of the profession, a commitment to self-development, and the professional leadership expertise into the development of an individual professional nursing identity

MSN Curriculum

The MSN curriculum includes four core courses required for both tracks. The graduate nursing core courses are intended as a foundation in graduate nursing practice which align with current standards, procedures and guidelines of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing Essentials. Each MSN track is further developed to meet or exceed respective specialty standards and competencies. The Family Nurse Practitioner track meets criteria for evaluation of nurse practitioner programs from the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty. The Nurse Executive Leadership track aligns with the American Organization for Nursing Leadership Competencies.

MSN CORE Courses

  • NSG 642 (3) Individual & Organizational Leadership in Healthcare
  • NSG 644 (3) Informatics, Quality & Safety in Healthcare
  • NSG 646 (3) Clinical Prevention and Population Health
  • NSG 648 (3) Research and Evidence-based Practice

Family Nurse Practitioner Track

Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs) are clinical experts prepared to implement a holistic approach that emphasizes both care and cure. They apply evidenced-based practices and manage the health needs of patients in primary care and outpatient settings. The focus of the FNP track is to provide academic knowledge and the clinical skills necessary for health promotion, disease prevention, assessment, and management of acute and chronic illnesses.

The Family Nurse Practitioner track prepares graduates to become advanced practice providers with a primary care, family population focus. This track requires 45 credits, including 630 precepted clinical hours, and prepares students to deliver evidence-based, culturally competent, primary health care to individuals within the context of family and community. Graduates will be eligible to sit for national Family Nurse Practitioner certification exams.

Beginning in the summer of the final year of study, Family Nurse Practitioner students will begin their first of three Family Nurse Practitioner clinical courses These clinical courses will provide an opportunity for application of knowledge to the patient care setting with an assigned preceptor with faculty oversight and evaluation. In addition to their online coursework, students enrolled in this track will also have one on-campus skills workshops lasting two days This on-campus, hands-on workshop will prepare them to care for patients throughout their clinical experiences with advanced diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Examples of these skills may include gynecologic examinations, skin suturing, and musculoskeletal intra-articular injections. Family Nurse Practitioner students will continue to participate in didactic and clinical courses in the final year of study, emphasizing the knowledge and skills needed in the primary care provider role.

Family Nurse Practitioner Outcomes

The Family Nurse Practitioner MSN graduate will be able to:

  1. Manage the care of patients in the primary care setting by utilizing principles of assessment, diagnosis, planning and evaluation.
  2. Diagnose pathologies and perform procedures in the primary care setting.
  3. Partner with patients to provide and advocate for person-centered, culturally relevant care.
  4. Develop and engage in interprofessional collaboration and community partnerships to meet the needs of a diverse patient population.
  5. Apply leadership and professionalism in the role of advanced nursing practice.
  6. Synthesize understanding of the healthcare delivery system to promote safe, cost-effective care.
  7. Apply principles of population health, quality improvement, and evidence-based practice to primary care practice.

FNP Required Courses

MSN CORE Courses

  • NSG 642 (3) Individual & Organizational Leadership in Healthcare
  • NSG 644 (3) Informatics, Quality & Safety in Healthcare
  • NSG 646 (3) Clinical Prevention and Population Health
  • NSG 648 (3) Research and Evidence-based Practice

FNP Courses

  • NSG 602 (3) Advanced Pathophysiology for the APN
  • NSG 604 (3) Advanced Pharmacology
  • NSG 606 (3) Advanced Health Assessment and Clinical Diagnostics
  • NSG 610 (3) Primary Care of Women Across the Lifespan
  • NSG 612 (3) Primary Care of Children and Adolescents
  • NSG 614 (3) Primary Care of Adults I
  • NSG 616 (3) Primary Care of Adults II
  • NSG 618 (1) Primary Care Skills I: Diagnostics and Procedures
  • NSG 620 (1) Primary Care Skills II: Billing/Coding and Care Management
  • NSG 622 (2) Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical I
  • NSG 624 (2) Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical II
  • NSG 626 (2) Family Nurse Practitioner Clinical III
  • NSG 630 (1) FNP Synthesis
  • NSG 674 (3) Healthcare Delivery Systems

 

Nurse Executive Leadership Track

The Nurse Executive Leadership track is designed to develop the knowledge, leadership abilities, and interpersonal and interprofessional skills to improve the healthcare system. Students in this track will complete 33 credit hours, including a minimum of 210 precepted practicum hours. Graduates will be prepared to lead in the delivery of safe, timely, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered care, and to employ advocacy strategies to influence policy across the healthcare system.

Nurse Executive Leadership track students will build their specialty knowledge with online didactic courses in the first two semesters. All Nurse Executive Leadership students will attend a summer on-campus, two-day workshop to develop hands-on skills in programs used for strategic planning and forecasting. The final year of study will include both didactic and practicum courses. Practicum courses will be precepted experiences with nurse executive mentoring and supervision, and evaluated by faculty. Each clinical course is one credit hour with a required 105 precepted hours. Students who anticipate continuation to their DNP degree have the option to enroll in each of these courses for 1-3 credit hours and respective 105 – 315 precepted hours. These additional hours would count towards the DNP requirement of 1,000 total precepted graduate hours required for graduation.

Graduates will also meet the education eligibility requirements to sit for AONL and ANCC certification exams in executive nursing leadership.

Nurse Executive Leadership Track Outcomes

The Nursing Leadership MSN Graduate will be able to:

  1. Synthesize and apply effective communication skills with diverse individuals to promote community, academic and interprofessional relationships.
  2. Model leadership in health systems, including reflective practice and visionary thinking.
  3. Synthesize understanding of systems and leadership skills to effectively manage change, lead health systems and plan for succession.
  4. Synthesize and apply ethics and professional accountability, including advocacy for the health care team, for patients/families and for the community.
  5. Advocate for the advancement of the profession and create a professional career plan for nurse executive leadership.
  6. Synthesize financial and strategic management, human resource management, and information management skills necessary to lead health systems.

Nurse Executive Leadership Required Courses

MSN CORE Courses

  • NSG 642 (3) Individual & Organizational Leadership in Healthcare
  • NSG 644 (3) Informatics, Quality & Safety in Healthcare
  • NSG 646 (3) Clinical Prevention and Population Health
  • NSG 648 (3) Research and Evidence-based Practice

Change of Master’s Program Track

Students interested in being considered for a change of program track should contact the Director of the Graduate Nursing Programs. This change requires full consideration by the Graduate Program Committee. Program track changes should be submitted by August 1st for Fall term and by December 1st for Spring term.

MSN Degree Requirements

Non-Thesis Culminating Experience

Miami University requires students in a master degree program to complete a thesis or non-thesis culminating experience as part of their program. The MSN program integrates a required non-thesis experience as a series of clinical/ practicum courses which vary by MSN track:

Family Nurse Practitioner

  • NSG 622 FNP Clinical
  • NSG 624 FNP Clinical II
  • NSG 626 FNP Capstone Clinical III

Nurse Executive Leadership

  • NSG 684 Nurse Executive Leadership Practicum I
  • NSG 686 Nurse Executive Leadership Capstone Practicum II

Each clinical placement is reviewed and approved by the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator, and the Graduate Director and/ or MSN track Director prior to each clinical. This non-thesis, culminating experience is documented by the student with the MSN Culminating Paper in their final semester; and it is evaluated by a committee of at least 2 (two) graduate level A or B nursing faculty. Note that students’ clinical performance is evaluated in each clinical course separate from the MSN Culminating Paper. Guidelines for the MSN Culminating Paper are found in the MSN Syntheses courses.

MSN Comprehensive Exam

All students will complete a proctored comprehensive exam as an end of program assessment. The Comprehensive exam for each MSN track will cover content from each respective track and prepare students for their national certification exam. This exam also serves as Miami University’s Master degree comprehensive exam requirement. Students must receive a passing score established by each MSN track. If students do not receive a passing score on the first attempt, they may take a second exam after 14 days. A student may only attempt the exam two times. If the Student does not pass the second attempt, they become ineligible to receive the MSN degree. The MSN Comprehensive Exam will be reviewed and evaluated by a committee of two graduate nursing faculty, determined by the Nursing Department. A student under academic probation is not eligible to take a comprehensive examination, final examination (see the MU Policy Library), or to graduate. A student’s cumulative Miami graduate level grade point average must be at least 3.0, and a student may not have grades of incomplete, to take a comprehensive examination, to take a final examination (see the MU Policy Library) for any graduate degree, or to graduate.

MU Policy Library), incomplete, to take MU Policy Library)

All Miami University academic integrity charges against a student must be resolved and sanctions completed before a student is eligible to graduate.

M-1 Form

All students must complete their non-thesis culminating experience and comprehensive exam no later than three weeks prior to commencement. Documentation of passing these requirements will be documented with Miami’s M-1 form and submitted by the Nursing Department to the Graduate School.

Time Limitations

Students must complete the coursework and earn their MSN within five (5) years after they first register as a graduate student. This limit applies to all degree-seeking students, both full-time and part-time.

Program Interruptions and Readmission

A student in good academic standing who interrupts their program for any reason, including approved Leave of Absence (LOA), after two (2) consecutive required semesters (including summer if required by program/ track) must apply for readmission to the MSN program. Students looking to take a LOA must successfully complete at least one semester in their current program and be in good standing. Students who were not in good standing at the time they left the program, or who need more than five years to complete their program, may seek permission, and readmission is dependent upon approval by the Graduate Nursing Committee, The Graduate School, and upon availability of space and facilities for the term in which readmission is requested. Students with questions regarding program interruptions and/ or readmission should contact the Director of Graduate Nursing Programs and review the Graduate School Registration policy.

Coursework and Grading

Students must complete all required courses for each track to earn the respective MSN degree. To receive credit for the courses in the MSN program, students must earn a minimum of a B minus (B-) for their final course-grade. Any grade below a B minus (B-) is considered an MSN course failure. If a student received a final course grade below a B minus (B-), they will be permitted to retake one course in the MSN program. Upon a second occurrence, of a grade below a B minus (B-), the student will be dismissed from the MSN program without an opportunity to retake additional courses.

Students must maintain a cumulative 3.0 GPA in their graduate courses to progress each semester in the MSN program. If a student’s GPA falls below a 3.0, they will be placed on academic probation for one semester. A graduate student who is on academic probation will be dismissed if his/her subsequent semester or summer term grade point average is less than 3.0. Academic dismissal is considered a permanent action.

Department of Nursing Grading Scale

97-100 A+
93-96 A
90-92 A-
87-89 B+
83-86 B
80-82 B-
77-79 C+
73-76 C
70-72 C-
67-69 D+
63-66 D
69-62 D-
Less than 69 F

Required On-Campus Workshops

All students are required to attend the on-campus workshop within their MSN track. Notification of the date of the will be communicated to students no less than six months before the workshop.

Transfer of Credit

Admitted students may have earned graduate credits that they wish to apply to their MSN degree. Credit for these courses will be reviewed by the Graduate Nursing Director and the Graduate Nursing committee via a gap analysis and following Miami Graduate registration policy. There is no guarantee that incoming credit(s) will be approved for credit towards the Miami MSN degree. Per Miami University policy, a maximum of one third of total credits can count towards student’s MSN degree.

Student Services

Miami Graduate School is committed to advocating and supporting graduate programs dedicated to the pursuit of new knowledge and best teaching practices that promote diverse, globally aware students and faculty. Resources provided by the graduate school are located on the Student Services website, including Handbooks and Guides, Forms, Graduation, and Funding Opportunities.

Faculty Advising

All students will receive an assigned Faculty Advisor at the start of the program. Students will meet with their assigned advisor prior to starting the MSN program and at least twice per year to discuss career goals, course planning, and to serve as mentors. Students should talk with their advisor if they are considering dropping a course or if they are changing the sequencing of courses from their original program plan.

Academic Assistance

Students needing additional academic assistance are encouraged to communicate with Miller Center for Disability Studies and with their individual course faculty.

Miller Center for Disability Studies

Graduate Student Organizations

  1. Graduate Students will elect a minimum of two student representatives to serve on the Graduate Nursing Committee each year. The Graduate Nursing Committee is the formal channel whereby students can be involved in the policy- and decision- making of the nursing graduate program. Students are, therefore, encouraged to familiarize themselves with the responsibilities of the Graduate Nursing Committee and to provide input to this committee for its tasks. When students would like the committee to discuss policy, they may request through their representatives that an item be placed on the committee’s agenda for discussion. Student representatives are elected by their peers. Students nominated to act as the representative for each cohort must agree to the nomination prior to the start of voting.
  2. The Graduate Student Association is open to all graduate students. It sponsors a travel assistance fund, publishes a regular newsletter, advocates for the interests and concerns of graduate students, and organizes several social events each year. The Assistant to the Dean of the Graduate School is the adviser. The GSA selects student representatives to the University Senate, Graduate Council, and numerous campus-wide committees.
  3. The Graduate Students of Color Association is designed to enhance the campus life of graduate students of color by providing academic, cultural, political, and social support. This support system functions to facilitate academic excellence through tutorial, liaison, and networking systems. It helps to foster diversity and pluralism among graduate students. The Assistant Dean of Admissions at the Graduate School is the adviser.
  4. Student Pride Association (GSPA). The purpose of GSPA is first and to provide a safe and inclusive space for LGBTQ+ and queer graduate professional students at Miami University. Safe spaces cultivate community marginalized groups and are thus vital to LGBTQ+ and queer graduate Furthermore, GSPA will represent and give voice to the concerns of and queer graduate and professional students at Miami University.

Communication

All persons in the Department of Nursing community (students, staff, and faculty) are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner when communicating with one another in person, by e-mail, or on the phone.

It is the students’ responsibility to notify the Department of Nursing and One Stop with any name, address, or phone number changes within one week of the change.

A Miami University-provided email address (UniqueID@MiamiOH.edu) is an official means of communication. Students are responsible for all University communication sent to their Miami email address. It is expected that students check their email account on a frequent and consistent basis. To ensure that students remain current with University-related communications, students are strongly encouraged to check their email daily. Students are advised to respond to all official University communications as directed in each communication (e.g., responding in person, by surface mail, or by email). Students should not assume an email response is a satisfactory substitution when directed otherwise.

Students are subject to this email policy beginning with MSN orientation, during academic terms for which they are enrolled, during breaks between terms, during University holidays and vacations, and during periods of suspension.

Students may forward their Miami email to another email address (e.g., @Gmail). However, Miami University is not liable for any problems that may result from forwarding Miami email to another account (e.g., problems with spam filters, full mailboxes, or loss of attachments). Students should understand that forwarding their university email may have the unintended consequence of exposing their privacy information to third parties because Internet email is handled in a public fashion.

Faculty members determine how they will use email in their classes. Faculty may wish to include their email expectations in the course syllabus. The distribution of mass communications is restricted to university departments and offices for university business. External requests for mass communications will not be honored.

As stated in the policy titled “Responsible Use of Computing Resources”, “The University employs various measures to protect the security of its computing resources and users’ accounts. However, users should be aware that the University does not and cannot guarantee such security.”

Furthermore, individuals are advised to exercise caution when sending sensitive or FERPA-protected student information via email. In addition, individuals are reminded that some University information is not appropriate for email communication.

Academic Integrity

Miami University is a scholarly community whose members believe that excellence in education is grounded in qualities of character as well as of intellect. We respect the dignity of other persons, the rights and property of others, and the right of others to hold and express disparate beliefs. We believe in honesty, integrity, and the importance of moral conduct. We defend the freedom of inquiry that is the heart of learning and combine that freedom with the exercise of judgment and the acceptance of personal responsibility.

Miami demands the highest standards of professional conduct from its students, faculty, and staff. As a community of scholars, our fundamental purpose is the pursuit of knowledge. Integrity in research and creative activities and in academic study is based on sound disciplinary practices and expectations, as well as a commitment to the values of honesty and integrity.

The faculty have the right and the obligation to set standards for ethical and honest academic study and research and creative activity. The graduate faculty are responsible for communicating and discussing these standards with their graduate students. Students are also responsible for knowing and understanding these standards and misunderstanding does not justify the violation of academic integrity. If a student is in doubt about appropriate academic conduct in a particular situation, he or she should consult with the instructor in the course, the department chair/program director, or the Dean of the Graduate School in order to maintain the highest standards of academic honesty.

As appropriate to their area of academic study and research or creative activities, graduate students should receive instruction on responsible conduct of research that includes but is not limited to the following:

  • Research involving human subjects (Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects Research)
  • Research involving vertebrate animals (Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee)
  • Research involving radiation (Radiation Safety Committee)
  • Laboratory safety
  • Security including issues related to the handling of transgenic plants and pathogenic organisms (Institutional Biosafety Committee)
  • Ethical collection, analysis, attribution, and sharing of data and results of research.
  • Compliance with applicable state and federal regulations, conflicts of interest and grant and contract requirements.

Violation of responsible conduct of research guidelines may be considered a violation of research/creative activity integrity.

Criteria

Whereas many standards of conduct are discipline specific, there are well-established standards that apply to all graduate students in all disciplines. All students are expected to engage in ethical behavior in their academic study and in all forms of scholarship. Unethical or dishonest conduct in academic study or in research and creative activity will lead to disciplinary action, up to and including dismissal.

Definitions of Unethical or Dishonest Conduct in Academic Study

Unethical or dishonest conduct in academic study (academic dishonesty) includes, but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, fabrication, falsification, or obtaining an unfair advantage in any academic activity. A finding of academic dishonesty requires that there is a significant departure from accepted academic practices of the relevant academic community.

  1. Academic Activity: the submission or presentation of student work for evaluation, faculty or peer review, grading or academic credit. This includes, but is not limited to academic assignments, thesis or dissertation work, proficiency exams, or oral exams.
  2. Aiding and Abetting Academic Dishonesty:
    1. providing material, information, or other assistance to another person with knowledge that such aid would be used in unethical or dishonest academic activity; or
    2. providing false information in connection with any inquiry regarding academic integrity.
  3. Cheating:
    1. using unauthorized notes, study aids, or information on an examination;
    1. altering a graded work after it has been returned, then submitting the work for regarding without the instructor’s permission;
    2. allowing another person to do one’s work and submitting that work under one’s own name;
    3. submitting identical or substantially similar papers for credit in more than one (1) course without prior permission from the course instructors.
  1. Plagiarism: submitting material that in part or whole is not entirely one’s own work without attributing those same portions to their correct source.
  2. Fabrication or Falsification:
    1. or inventing any information, data or citation;
    2. information or data that was not gathered in accordance standards or guidelines defining the appropriate methods for or generating information, or data and failing to include an account of the method by which the information or data was or collected.
  3. Obtaining an Unfair Advantage:
    1. unauthorized collaborating on an academic assignment;
    2. retaining, possessing, using or circulating previously given examination materials, where those materials clearly indicate that they are to be returned to the instructor at the conclusion of the examination; or
    3. intentionally obstructing or interfering with another student’s academic work.

Definitions of Unethical or Dishonest Conduct in Research or Creative Activity

Unethical or dishonest conduct (misconduct in research /creative activity) includes, but is not limited to fabrication, falsification, or plagiarism in proposing, performing, or reviewing research, or in reporting research activity or results or in any creative activity. Misconduct does not include honest error or differences of opinion. A finding of misconduct requires that there be a significant departure from accepted practices of the relevant research/creative activity community; and the misconduct be committed intentionally, or knowingly, or recklessly.

  1. Creative Activity: Creative activity refers to work of a scholarly nature designed to develop or contribute to knowledge and experience. This encompasses, but is not limited to, creative activity in the fine arts and humanities. Examples include performances, exhibitions, recordings, master classes, presentations, lecture- demonstrations, the creation of original work (compositions, plays, poetry, designs, and other pieces of art), and the development of pedagogical materials.
  2. Research: Research is a systematic investigation designed to develop or contribute to knowledge and includes all basic and applied research in all fields. This includes, but is not limited to, research in natural science, education, economics, linguistics, psychology, social sciences, statistics, and research involving human subjects and animals.
  3. Fabrication: Fabrication is making up data or results and recording or reporting them.
  4. Falsification: Falsification is manipulating research materials, equipment, or processes, or changing or omitting data or results such that the research is not accurately represented in the research record.
  5. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the appropriation of another person’s ideas, processes, results or words without giving appropriate credit.
  6. Obtaining an Unfair Advantage:
    1. collaborating on a research or creative activity;
    2. obstructing or interfering with another student’s research or activity.

Grievance Procedures for Students

Students who may have a grievance or concern should address the issue with the following steps, following department and the Graduate School Grievance Policy.

  1. Instructor Level: In all cases the student should first meet with the instructor to voice a complaint and to receive an explanation and possible redress. If the student is not satisfied with the explanation, he or she should confer with the chair of the department and ask for a review of the grade through the departmental grievance procedure. The student should recognize the difference between questioning a grade and charging an instructor with a violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices. The latter is a serious act and should neither be undertaken lightly nor should the desire to have a grade reviewed and changed be the primary motivation. A student initiating a grievance procedure should be aware that the University Senate has ruled that the final determination of a student’s grade remains with the instructor, regardless of the outcome of any appeal procedure.
  2. Department Chair Level: Initial Steps for Resolution: If a student approaches the Chair with a grievance, such as a request for a grade review or a charge of violation of the Statement of Good Teaching Practices as stated in the Miami University Policy Library, the Chair will ascertain whether the student has discussed the situation with the faculty person involved. If no discussion has occurred, the Chair will recommend the student do so before proceeding with any grievance procedure. The Chair also has the option of meeting with the student and faculty person to help reach a resolution if all parties agree.
  1. Formal Procedure: To initiate a formal grievance procedure, the student will provide the Chair with a signed written statement of the grievance. The Chair will forward a copy of the student’s grievance to the instructor promptly after receiving it, together with a request for information relevant to the situation. The instructor shall also forward to the Chair a written reply to the student’s statement. The written statements and any other relevant materials shall then be forwarded to an Academic Grievance Committee. Academic Grievance Committee: The Chair shall appoint three representative faculty to serve as the committee and secure an administrator from outside the department to serve as hearing officer if a hearing is deemed necessary. These persons should not be teaching on the same teaching team as the faculty person against whom the complaint was filed. The Committee shall meet and examine the forwarded materials and determine whether the matter can be decided without a hearing. If a hearing is not required, the committee shall write a recommendation regarding the grievance within a reasonable period of time. The report is then sent to or discussed with the Chair of the Department. The Chair will forward copies of the report to the student and instructor. If the Academic Grievance Committee determines a hearing is necessary, the following procedures will be utilized to conduct the hearing. In addition to the three faculty members on the committee, another person representing the University administration will be asked to conduct the hearing as the department chair designee.
    1. department chair designee will communicate the date, time, and location the hearing to all members of the committee, the student, and the faculty involved in the grievance. If either party is bringing witnesses, that is responsible to communicate the date, time, and location of the hearing those witnesses. Locations may be virtual if a student is unable to attend
    2. hearing will be closed to only those persons who are members of the Grievance Committee, the department chair designee, the student, faculty member, and any witnesses or advisors to the student and faculty
    3. student and the faculty member may also bring an advisor who is a of the University community to the hearing. Said member of the community must be a faculty member, administrator or Student staff member. Neither party is permitted to bring an attorney.
    4. The student and the faculty member will submit copies of any documentation they wish the Committee to consider, and a list of witnesses they expect to bring, to the department chair designee at least five days prior to the scheduled hearing. The department chair designee will then provide the student and the faculty member with a copy of the documents and witness list submitted by the other.
  1. The student and the faculty member may bring witnesses who are able to provide testimony directly related to the specific issues. Character witnesses whose only purpose is to attest to the student’s personality are not generally necessary and, in the interest of time, may not be permitted to provide testimony. Formal Rules of Evidence will not apply. The Hearing Committee will receive only that information determined to be relevant or important in light of the totality of the circumstances.
  2. At the beginning of the hearing, the department chair designee will advise the student and the faculty member of the following procedures:
    1. Each party may make a brief opening statement.
    2. The student has the first opportunity to provide information and call witnesses. The members of the Committee and the involved faculty member may ask questions of the student and the witnesses.
    3. The faculty member may then provide information and call witnesses. The members of the Committee and the student may ask questions of the faculty member and the witnesses.
    4. Witnesses will remain outside the hearing room when not providing information or responding to questions.
    5. Each party may make a closing statement.
    6. The Academic Grievance Committee may deliberate at the close of the hearing or at another time convenient to the members of the committee. The deliberation is not open to the student, the involved faculty member, or any of the witnesses. The department chair designee may sit in during the deliberations at his/her discretion.
    7. The Academic Grievance Committee shall produce written findings and recommendations and submit this document to the department chair designee within five days of the hearing.
    8. The department chair designee shall send the written findings and recommendations to the student, the involved faculty member and the department chair within two days of receiving said document.
  3. Level; Student Appeals Decision: If the student wishes to appeal the beyond the departmental level, the student may submit to the divisional committee following procedures described in the Graduate School Policy.

In the case of a request for a grade change: If the Academic Grievance Committee believes the grade should be reviewed further or changed, they will make such recommendations to the Chair. The Chair will discuss the recommendations with the instructor. The instructor has the final decision on grades and does not have to change the grade as recommended.

In the case of a student filing charges of violation of Good Teaching Practices: The Academic Grievance Committee will decide as to whether such practices were violated, and put in writing any recommendations regarding this, which is to be submitted to the Chair. The Chair makes the final departmental decision regarding violation of Good Teaching Practices. The student may appeal the decision to the College of Liberal Arts and Applied Science grievance committee.

Compliance

To meet clinical affiliation compliance requirements, all graduate nursing students are required to provide health and immunization documentation and undergo a criminal background check and drug test. Admission to the program is contingent upon a satisfactory criminal background check. All other compliance requirements are due January 1st of each year.

CastleBranch is the online vendor used for tracking student documentation of these requirements, including immunizations, certifications, and releases When starting their MSN program, students will receive information regarding how to set up their myCB account. Students will use this account to submit required documents each year. Note that background checks are not submitted through CastleBranch; and should instead be submitted to the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator, Raquel Campbell campb317@miamioh.edu

Students will need to complete their requirements by January 1st of the year in which they will begin clinical courses, which may vary based on part-time or full-time status. Generally, full time students’ compliance deadline will be January 1st of their first year of study. Part-time students’ compliance deadline will be January 1st of their second year of study. Students should confirm their deadlines with their advisors when planning their progression plans.

  • Family Nurse Practitioner student’s first clinical is NSG 622, offered every summer.
  • Nurse Executive Leadership first clinical course is NSG 684, offered every fall.

Graduate Student Compliance Requirements List

The following table provides a quick summary of MSN Compliance Requirements. All compliance items are due January 1st of the first year of clinical courses, and submitted to CastleBranch. Details regarding each of these requirements is described below.

Criminal Records Check

Annual state and federal background checks are required beginning January 1 of first year of clinical and/ or practicum courses and then annually. A positive finding on a background check may inhibit a student’s clinical placement and, ultimately, continuation in the program. *Submit directly to Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator

10 Panel Urine Drug

To be completed by all students prior to the start of clinical and then annually. Current positive drug screen results will prevent a student from participating in clinicals.

Professional Nurse’s License

Students must also an unencumbered nursing license from their current state or state in which they will be performing clinical time (IL, IN, KY, or OH).

B Virus (HBV/HBSAB Series) OR Titer

One of the following is required:

  • 3 documented vaccinations
  • Positive antibody titer
  • Signed declination form

CPR

Only American Heart Association Healthcare provider BLS certification, which includes AED, will be accepted. Both sides of your signed card are required as documentation, due four months prior to students’ first clinical and it must remain active through the rest of the MSN program.

Seasonal Flu Vaccine

Documentation of vaccination from current season. This is due in students first fall clinical semester and then annually by October 15

Exam

A physician, nurse practitioner, certified nurse-midwife or a physician assistant must provide signed documentation of the initial physical exam.

Vaccine

Unless exempted, all students must provide proof of 2 doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine or one dose of Johnson & Johnson. Boosters as recommended by the CDC are also required. This policy may be adjusted as the pandemic evolves.

Diphtheria Pertussis

TD booster or TDaP vaccine given within 10 years. Renewal every 10 years is required.

Mumps, Rubella (MMR)

MMR vaccines required or 2 measles, 1 mumps and 1 rubella. A titer showing will also be accepted.

TB Test (Skin or Blood)

Negative test due annually

Varicella

Titer, or proof of vaccination

Background Check

The clinical agency affiliates of the Department of Nursing require a criminal record check be completed by the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Identification and Investigation (BCII) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Non-Ohio students will complete a state-specific background check in addition to the FBI check.

The first criminal record check for MSN students will be due on January 1 of the first year of clinical/ practicum courses and then annually. 

Please note that this process may take over a month to complete so students must plan accordingly.

All students must get a background check upon admission and annually. Students who have positive records are advised to seriously consider whether or not to enroll in the MSN program Miami cannot guarantee clinical course placement when there is a positive finding on a background check. Prior to accepting a student into their clinical settings, health care institutions require notification of any positive finding on a background check. The healthcare institution makes the determination as to whether the student will be allowed a clinical placement or not. If clinical placements are not granted, the student may not be able to complete the requirements of the educational program.

In the Event a Criminal Record Check is Positive, the following actions will take place based on the offense:

Each student is responsible to obtain the criminal record check and request that it be sent to the Department of Nursing by start of the MSN program. Each student will sign a waiver that the Department may release all required information to appropriate individuals, institutions, and agencies providing clinical experiences. Any student whose criminal record check has not been received by the Department of Nursing prior to the start of a required clinical experience will not be permitted to enroll in their clinical/ practicum course.

Students are responsible to pay the fee for each criminal record check. Fees are paid to the agency conducting the criminal record check.

Review of criminal record check

  1. Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator will receive and review all completed criminal record checks.
  2. Negative results (no criminal activity) will be kept in the student’s Department of Nursing electronic records file.
  3. Positive results will be given to the Department Chair to determine any action needed. (i.e.: consultation with any clinical agency personnel, etc.)
  4. Students will be notified by the Department Chair of any positive result and whether the student may continue in the original placement, be changed to a different placement, or is unable to be admitted, re-admitted, or to progress in the graduate nursing program.

A copy of the student’s criminal record results will be kept in the student’s electronic file with the Department of Nursing. The report will be held in the strictest confidence. Only those individuals who have a need to know related to the student’s enrollment and academic progress, e.g., course coordinator, clinical agency, etc. will have access to this information

Ohio Professional Nursing License (or Indiana, Kentucky or Illinois if enrolled in that state). Students must hold an unencumbered nursing license from their current state or the state in which they will be performing clinical time. Directions will be listed on CastleBranch as to how to provide evidence of the RN license from the registered nurse license search website.

CPR Certification

Care Provider level of CPR training. Students must submit, electronically, their proof of CPR certification. This proof will be either a scanned copy of students' CPR certification card or a signed form by an authorizing person (i.e., staff development instructor from hospital) indicating that the student successfully completed the applicable CPR certification program. The annual CPR renewal requirement will be waived for those students holding a current CPR Instructor Certification. CPR certification must remain active throughout the student’s MSN enrollment.

The following are acceptable CPR certifications: ✓ Basic Life Support for HealthCare Provider (BLS) by the American Red Cross ✓ Basic Life Support (BLS Provider) by the American Heart Association ✓ Basic Life Support (BLS –RQI Program) by the American Heart Association ✓ Basic Life Support (BLS) by the American Safety and Health Institute.

Physical Exam

Graduate students must present a Miami University Department of Nursing Medical History Form with physical examination results from a healthcare provider regarding health status. The Department of Nursing medical history form must be completed, submitted electronically, and approved in CastleBranch by January 1st of the first year of study. If students have a significant change in their health status while in the MSN program, they are required to notify the department of nursing.

Tetanus-Diphtheria Pertussis

Option 1: Previous primary vaccine series as a child (DTP or DTaP) & 1 dose of acellular pertussis (TDAP) as an adolescent or adult. TDAP is a one-time adult dose. It can be given at any interval after Tetanus Diphtheria Vaccine. TDAP was not available prior to 9/2005. TD, and DTaP will not fulfill this requirement. Option 2: Td Tetanus-Diphtheria immunization every 10 years following the adult cellular pertussis vaccine TDAP).

TB Skin Test

One of the following is required annually:

  1. A negative TB (Mantoux) skin test
  2. Negative blood test such as TB QuantiFERON Gold (lab report required) or T-Spot (lab report required).

Chickenpox Varicella Vaccine OR Positive Blood Titer

Immunization or positive antibody titer (history of the disease is not sufficient).

MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) Vaccines Vaccine

Immunization or positive antibody titer.

Hepatitis B Virus (HBV/HBSAB Series) OR Titer

Immunization or positive antibody titer

Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

Provide documentation of annual immunization by October 15th during each year of enrollment.

COVID Vaccine

Graduate students must meet the COVID vaccination requirement of the university and of their clinical placement agency. These are evolving as the pandemic progresses. Current guidelines will be communicated to students via email as before clinical courses begin.

Department of Nursing Graduate Program Drug Policy and Procedure

Miami University is committed to the safety of its students, staff, faculty in all facets of their education, including clinical and field placements. Safety in the delivery of care to patient/client populations is of paramount importance. The use of “alcohol and other substances potentially places patients, the public, and nurses themselves at risk for serious injury or death” (International Nurses Society on Addictions, 2017). Protecting patients from potential harm caused by an impaired nurse is a professional responsibility, as indicated in the American Nurses Association (ANA) Code of Ethics, Provision 3.6 (ANA, 2015).

This policy applies to all Miami University (“University”) students admitted to the MSN Nursing Program (“Program”) and is effective immediately. All University students admitted to the Program are required to complete clinical coursework at a hospital, clinic, nursing home, or other healthcare facility in order to complete their degree requirements. The purpose of this Policy is to notify students and faculty of the University’s requirement that all students in the Program submit to an annual drug screen as outlined in this policy and test negative before engaging in clinical activity associated with the Program (“Clinical Activity” or “Clinical Activities”). Clinical agencies affiliated with the University have drug and alcohol policies and require that nursing students comply with their drug testing policies in the same manner as their employees (e.g. 10 drug panel testing).

Clinical sites have the right to refuse any student for clinical placement based on concerns about that student’s ability to deliver safe practice.

It is the policy of Miami University to comply with federal and state laws and regulations dealing with the usage and detection of drugs. This Policy is subject to change at the sole discretion of the University and is meant to supplement other relevant University policies. This Policy is in addition to any drug and alcohol testing policies and procedures at the clinical sites, and while students are engaging in clinical activities at hospitals, clinics, nursing homes, or other facilities on behalf of the Program, the drug and alcohol testing policies and procedures of the hospital, clinic, nursing home, or facility will also govern.

Clinical and Practicum Information

Miami Nursing MSN program utilizes a clinical preceptorship model to provide nurse practitioner students the opportunity to obtain clinical experiences in diverse clinical settings. The preceptorship bridges theory and clinical practice and provides students with the opportunity to practice graduate nursing roles. Students socialize into the nurse practitioner, or nurse executive leadership role by becoming a healthcare team member with the preceptor providing guidance as a role model, mentor, and resource person.

Procurement of appropriate clinical sites and preceptors, as well as assuring the completion of the required quantity and quality of clinical hours to meet program requirements is the responsibility of the Department of Nursing. The Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator will initiate procurement of the site and may receive input from the Director of Graduate Nursing Programs, Graduate Nursing faculty and/or the specific Track Coordinator. Students may assist with clinical/ practicum placement by providing to the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator suggested clinicians in their community or through their place of employment. Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator is responsible for thoroughly vetting the clinical site and the preceptor to meet the needs of the clinical/ practicum experience including, but not limited to: patient census and type of patients seen; preceptor qualifications, license and credentials.

Clinical placements are a combined effort that involves several people, including the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator, Program Directors, as well as system level legal contracts. Therefore, students must use clear communication related to placements to ensure that contracts are in place and all parties are aware of changes or irregularities. However, in general, if you have any questions, please contact Raquel Campbell, email campb317@miamioh.edu.

A clinical/ practicum agency site agreement is required for all clinical sites PRIOR to the start of clinical.

Clinical Locations

Clinical and practicum experiences may take place in a wide range of health agencies. Examples of clinical placements may include hospitals, ambulatory care offices, federal agencies, professional organizations, city and county health departments, and schools and universities. Miami Department of Nursing will ensure that all students are able to obtain clinical and practicum preceptors in their state of residence (where they have their RN license). However, in cases or locations with very limited options, students may be asked to be flexible with placement opportunities. Students are encouraged to participate in the process to identify a preceptor, as this will greatly increase the chances of finding a placement that is a good fit for the student. Please note: Students are responsible for their own transportation to clinical sites. Students also are required to provide their own automobile insurance.

Preceptor and Clinical Site Agreement

Preceptor agreements must be completed, signed and approved by the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator for all preceptors PRIOR to the start of each clinical course. Forms must be completed thoroughly or will be returned to the student In addition to preceptor agreements, contractual agreements between Miami University and each respective agency/ organization are required for all clinical and practicum placements. The Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator will facilitate the execution of these agreements and will notify students when they are completed.

Students may not begin any clinical hours until all of the following are confirmed as complete by the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator:

  • Agency contractual agreement
  • Preceptor Agreement
  • Agency compliance requirements (immunizations, health screenings, etc.)
  • Verification of preceptor requirements)

Clinical Practice

Preceptors are valued at Miami University and provide an essential service to graduate nursing clinical education. All preceptors must be approved by Miami University before the student begins their clinical rotation.

FNP Clinical Practice

FNP Clinical Preceptor Qualifications
  • The majority of clinical experiences are with preceptors from the same population-focused area of practice in primary care. In addition, over the course of the program, an interdisciplinary mix of preceptors (providers) may be utilized to provide the student with the best clinical experience to meet program objectives and prepare the student for the FNP role, population-focus and full scope of practice.
  • Preceptors must be appropriately credentialed and licensed to practice in his or her area of practice and have at least one year of clinical experience. This area of practice is clearly relevant to meeting the objectives of the FNP track.
  • All primary preceptors must submit a completed Preceptor Agreement and CV/Preceptor Profile to the Department of Nursing prior to the clinical start date.
  • Preceptors must complete the Preceptor Orientation prior to precepting students in the clinical setting.

FNP Hours/ Visit Requirements

In order to complete the clinical requirements for the FNP track, students MUST complete a total of 630 clinical hours AND 500 patient encounters. 

Students enrolled in the FNP track will be required to complete 630 clinical hours in a healthcare setting(s) that is approved by the Clinical Placement Coordinator and the FNP Track Director. The clinical courses in the FNP track are NSG 622, NSG 624, and NSG 626. In each of these clinical courses, students will complete 210 clinical hours. These clinical hours will be logged into Typhon for tracking by the instructor. 

Within the required 630 clinical hours, students must complete a minimum of 500 patient encounters as outlined below: 

  • 100 Pediatric/Adolescent visits (0-18 years)
  • 80 Women’s Health Visits (Defined as any OB/GYN Diagnostic code and must include 5 speculum/bimanual exams)
  • 320 Adult/Geriatric Primary Care visits
    • 100 Episodic visits 
    • 100 Chronic Disease Management Visits
    • *Remaining 120 visits can include miscellaneous adult visits (i.e. physicals, well exams, etc.), episodic visits, and/or chronic disease management visits.

Students may complete more than 500 visits during their clinical rotations as they are working to obtain the required 630 hours. If they do not complete the 500 visits in the 630 clinical hours throughout the program, they will be required to obtain more hours to complete the visit requirement. 

Students may be required to have multiple clinical placements within a semester to obtain the necessary population visit requirements for the program.

Students cannot complete more than 80 clinical hours at a specialty practice (i.e. dermatology, cardiology, neurology, urology, etc.)

FNP Clinical Practice
  • The preceptorship must be in a successful practice, with adequate numbers and types of patients.
  • Clinical hours must be supervised direct patient care hours, distributed to support competency development in accordance with the student’s population-focused area of practice.
  • The three clinical courses, in totality, must provide the student with a variety of clients across the lifespan.
  • Professionally, the preceptor must exhibit interest and involvement in the advanced nurse practitioner role. The preceptor serves as host, sponsor, teacher, and role model for the student at the clinical site.
  • Enjoyment of teaching, commitment to students, and willingness to work with beginners are important characteristics in the development of a positive student/preceptor relationship.

The preceptor must be willing to review course objectives with lead faculty and determine the feasibility of meeting them and assisting the student and faculty in modifying objectives as needed. Additionally, time must be allowed to visit informally and formally with faculty for feedback. This is accomplished through clinical site visits, conducted through in person visits to the site or through telecommunications at least once per semester. Additionally, preceptors should contact faculty if there are any problems with a student or that arise during the clinical rotation.

Ideally, clinical practicum hours will be completed in a facility separate from the student’s employment. Students may not be paid or otherwise compensated for clinical hours and the preceptor, rather than the NP student, maintains overall responsibility for the provision of patient care during the student’s clinical practicum hours.

If the student is granted permission by the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator and the FNP Director to complete clinical practicum hours at their work place these hours MUST be completed outside of their usual role and working hours. The preceptor should not be a provider that the student works with directly during their usual employment, or with which the student has a personal relationship (e.g. friend, relative). The clinical coordinator and track coordinator make the ultimate decision to approve or deny hours with a specific preceptor. If the student is granted permission to complete clinical hours at their place of employment, the student and clinical preceptor will submit a letter (signed by both the NP student and preceptor) to the clinical coordinator attesting that they understand and agree that the clinical practicum hours will be completed outside of the student’s usual employment, unpaid, and that the student will be functioning strictly in a

If the student is granted permission by the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator and the FNP Director to complete clinical practicum hours at their work place these hours MUST be completed outside of their usual role and working hours. The preceptor should not be a provider that the student works with directly during their usual employment, or with which the student has a personal relationship (e.g. friend, relative). The clinical coordinator and track coordinator make the ultimate decision to approve or deny hours with a specific preceptor. If the student is granted permission to complete clinical hours at their place of employment, the student and clinical preceptor will submit a letter (signed by both the NP student and preceptor) to the clinical coordinator attesting that they understand and agree that the clinical practicum hours will be completed outside of the student’s usual employment, unpaid, and that the student will be functioning strictly in a student learning role with the preceptor providing direct supervision during clinical practicum hours.

student learning role with the preceptor providing direct supervision during clinical practicum hours.

The FNP Director and Clinical Placement Coordinator will review Typhon patient encounter entries to ensure a diverse population of patients are encountered. Students clinical placements will be chosen to provide experiences with patients across the lifespan. Students may be required to have multiple clinical placement within a semester to obtain the necessary population requirements for the program.

FNP Preceptor Responsibilities:
  • Review semester objectives and goals to facilitate clinical learning. Students should provide the course syllabi and clinical objectives to the preceptor.
  • Review daily objectives/goals with the student at the beginning of each clinical day.
  • Create a learning environment for the student and facilitate the critical thinking skills required of a nurse practitioner. This is chiefly a healthy exchange on patients seen and how the student would see the patients as an entry level nurse practitioner.
  • Provide feedback to the student regarding the assessment of the patient and the proposed plan of care.
  • The student should observe procedures (i.e. treatments, minor surgery, or invasive procedures) until he/she has displayed competence in a lab setting.
  • Discuss all abnormal examination findings, and the management plan for these problems, as much as time permits. Diagnostic reasoning is important to discuss along with lab or other diagnostic results.
  • The preceptor should be present in the clinical area during the student’s clinical experience.
  • The preceptor retains responsibility for all patient care

The clinical experience focuses on acute, emergent, and chronic conditions related to the student’s population-focused area of practice and includes interviewing, health assessment, differential diagnoses, formulation of evidence-based treatment plans, patient education, and case management.

Students may also attend rounds or webinars in which the preceptor may be involved. Students should be encouraged to participate in quality and safety endeavors that the clinical setting may be offering to staff and providers.

Student Responsibilities

The students are responsible for being self-directed in identifying initial and ongoing learning needs, for seeking learning opportunities to meet identified needs, and for being accountable for their performance in the nurse practitioner student role.

The FNP student should:

  • Assist as needed in obtaining signatures on required agency and preceptor contracts and agreements prior to starting clinical experiences;
  • Dress professionally including wearing a Miami Nursing Photo ID Name Tag and white lab coat at all times in the clinical setting;
  • Adhere to all Miami University and clinical agency regulations;
  • Discuss specific clinical objectives and negotiate a clinical schedule with the preceptor prior to the actual clinical experience;
  • Provide the clinical site with the necessary licensure, immunizations, background checks, certifications, drug screens, liability insurance, or other requirements needed;
  • Perform in the nurse practitioner role under the supervision of the preceptor, recognizing the limitations of educational preparation, and complying with professional standards, clinical site policies, and relevant protocols;
  • Demonstrate professional behavior appropriate for a nurse practitioner;
  • Maintain a documented clinical log in Typhon according to course requirements. Program faculty will monitor clinical information on a regular basis. Failure to maintain accurate student records will result in disciplinary action;
  • Demonstrate progressive independence and competency in the nurse practitioner role in accordance with one’s academic progression;
  • Arrive at the clinical experience prepared to perform assigned learning activities in accordance with course objectives;
  • Actively seek input in the evaluation process, and participate in self-evaluation of strengths and identified areas for professional growth with preceptor and designated faculty;
  • Contact faculty immediately if any conflict arises or when faculty assistance is needed;
  • Synthesize previously learned knowledge, new knowledge, and quality and patient safety principles into the care of clients with acute and chronic illness.
  • Demonstrate safety principles for self and patients in rendering care.
  • Perform psychomotor skills according to established procedures.
  • Recognize situations in which previous coursework applies.
  • Seek assistance appropriately; communicate problems to the appropriate person(s).
  • Function within an appropriate level of supervision.
  • Interact with healthcare colleagues, patients, and family members in a manner that demonstrates civility and respect.

Students are responsible for submitting clinical requests to the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator by the assigned dates, and may pursue additional clinical site/preceptor options as necessary to obtain the required clinical hours and clinical experiences.

Students may be required to travel to clinical sites in a variety of geographic settings. Students should be aware of the possibility of direct and indirect expenses associated with such travel, which are the responsibility of the student. It is encouraged to have one primary preceptor at each clinical site, although your primary preceptor may assist you in obtaining additional learning opportunities with team members at the site. Your primary preceptor(s) will be responsible for signing off on your clinical hours at the related clinical site and conducting your evaluation.

Student refusal to accept a clinical site may result in the student’s inability to complete the clinical hour requirement – which may delay and/or impede progress in their program plan of study.

NEL Clinical Practice

Nurse Executive Leadership Preceptor Qualifications

  • Preceptors must be appropriately credentialed and licensed to practice in his or her area of practice and have at least one year of experience in their leadership or education role. The area of practice should be clearly relevant to meeting the objectives of the student’s Nurse Executive Leadership track.
  • All preceptors must submit a completed Preceptor Agreement and CV/Preceptor Profile to the Department of Nursing prior to the clinical start date.
  • Preceptors must complete the Preceptor Orientation prior to precepting students in the clinical setting.

The preceptor must be willing to review course objectives with lead faculty and determine the feasibility of meeting them and assisting the student and faculty in modifying objectives as needed. Additionally, time must be allowed to visit informally and formally with faculty for feedback. This is accomplished through site visits, conducted through in person visits to the site or virtually at least twice per semester. Additionally, preceptors should contact faculty if there are any problems with a student or that arise during the clinical rotation.

Ideally, clinical/ practicum hours will be completed in a facility separate from the student’s employment. Students may not be paid or otherwise compensated for clinical hours.

If the student is granted permission by the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator and Graduate Director to complete clinical/ practicum hours at their work place, these hours MUST be completed outside of their usual role and working hours. The preceptor should not be a colleague that the student works with directly during their usual employment, or with which the student has a personal relationship (e.g. friend, relative). The clinical coordinator and track coordinator make the ultimate decision to approve or deny hours with a specific preceptor. If the student is granted permission to complete clinical hours at their place of employment, the student and preceptor will submit a letter (signed by both the student and preceptor) to the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator attesting that they understand and agree that the clinical practicum hours will be completed outside of the student’s usual employment, unpaid, and that the student will be functioning strictly in a student learning role.

NEL Preceptor Responsibilities defined:

  • Review semester objectives and goals to facilitate student learning. Students should provide the course syllabi and clinical objectives to the preceptor.
  • Collaborate with the student to develop appropriate project endeavors for the student to use as part of their role development
  • Review daily objectives/goals with the student at the beginning of each clinical/ practicum day.
  • Create a learning environment for the student and facilitate the critical thinking skills required of a nurse executive.
  • Provide feedback to the student regarding their project(s), professional development, and objectives

Students may also attend rounds or webinars in which the preceptor may be involved. Students should be encouraged to participate in quality and safety endeavors that the clinical setting may be offering to staff and providers.

Student Responsibilities

The students are responsible for being self-directed in identifying initial and ongoing learning needs, for seeking learning opportunities to meet identified needs, and for being accountable for their performance in the nurse practitioner student role.

The student should:

  • Assist faculty in obtaining signatures on Preceptor Memoranda of Agreement and General Agency Contracts, as needed, prior to starting clinical experiences.
  • Dress professionally and within the agency dress code requirements including wearing a Miami Nursing Photo ID Name Tag.
  • Adhere to all Miami University and clinical agency regulations.
  • Discuss specific clinical objectives and negotiate a schedule with the preceptor prior to the actual clinical experience.
  • Provide the clinical/ practicum site with the necessary licensure, immunizations, background checks, certifications, drug screens, liability insurance, or other requirements needed.
  • Perform in the graduate-level nursing role under the guidance of the preceptor;
  • Demonstrate professional behavior appropriate for a graduate-level nurse.
  • Maintain a documented clinical/ practicum log according to course requirements;
  • Demonstrate progressive independence and competency in the role in accordance with one’s academic progression.
  • Arrive at the agency prepared to perform assigned learning activities in accordance with course objectives.
  • Actively seek input in the evaluation process, and participate in self-evaluation of strengths and identified areas for professional growth with preceptor and designated faculty.
  • Contact faculty immediately if any conflict arises or when faculty assistance is needed.
  • Synthesize previously learned knowledge, new knowledge, and quality and patient safety principles into the care of clients with acute and chronic illness.
  • Demonstrate safety principles for self and patients in rendering care.
  • Recognize situations in which previous coursework applies.
  • Seek assistance appropriately; communicate problems to the appropriate person(s).
  • Function within an appropriate level of supervision.
  • Interact with healthcare colleagues, patients, and family members in a manner that demonstrates civility and respect.

Students are responsible for submitting clinical/ practicum requests to the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator by the assigned dates, and may pursue additional site/preceptor options as necessary to obtain the required hours and experiences.

Students may be required to travel to clinical/ practicum sites in a variety of geographic settings. Students should be aware of the possibility of direct and indirect expenses associated with such travel, which are the responsibility of the student. It is encouraged to have one primary preceptor at each site, although your primary preceptor may assist you in obtaining additional learning opportunities with team members at the site. Your primary preceptor(s) will be responsible for signing off on your clinical/ practicum hours at the related clinical site and conducting your evaluation.

Student refusal to accept a clinical/ practicum site may result in the student’s inability to complete the clinical hour requirement – which may delay and/or impede progress in their program plan of study.

Clinical Placement Coordinator

Clinical Placement Clinical Placement Coordinator will:

  • Procure and vet all clinical sites and ensure site contracts are complete prior to student start of each clinical/ practicum.
  • Procure and vet all preceptors and ensure preceptor agreements are complete prior to clinical practica.
  • Maintain all site contracts, preceptor contracts and licenses
  • Develop and foster community partnerships to ensure availability of qualified preceptors and clinical sites.
  • Validate student clinical compliance prior to beginning clinical practica.
  • Review feedback from students regarding clinical site(s) and preceptor(s) each semester and determine if recommended for use as future clinical practica placements.
  • Maintaining preceptor orientation materials and records of completed preceptor orientation.

Evaluation

Evaluation Preceptors evaluate student performance; however, faculty maintain overall responsibility for evaluation of student performance, preceptors, and clinical sites. Evaluations will be utilized to ensure continuous programmatic improvement. Details of evaluation are provided in each clinical/ practicum course syllabi.

Clinical Time Tracking

There are three clinical courses in the FNP track, each consisting of 210 hours for a total of 630 hours to be obtained prior to completion of the program. Hours will be tracked in Typhon. Hours must be entered in the ‘Time Log’ area of Typhon and approved by the preceptor and clinical faculty member. Students must upload their hours within 72 hours of completion in the clinical setting. Additional details on Typhon will be provided in the FNP clinical courses.

Nurse Executive Leader students will complete two clinical/ practicum courses. Each of these courses may be taken for 1-3 credit hours. Each credit hour required 105 clinical/ practicum hours. Additional hours would be used for completion of the DNP degree, for students planning to enroll in that program. Students will document their clinical and or practicum hours using the form provided.

Attendance

It is the responsibility of a student to promptly inform his/her preceptor in the event of an absence or illness. Absences without previous notification will be considered unprofessional behavior and will negatively affect student’s evaluation and subsequent course grade.

Identification Badge and Dress Code

Students must wear Miami University identification at all times and any name pin or other identification given by the clinical agency. All students must be professionally attired in the clinical setting. Students must comply with clinical agency policies for attire and appearance, for example: piercings, tattoos, artificial nails, etc. Preceptor and faculty will inform the students as to the acceptable attire and professional appearance for each agency and clinical experience.

Confidentiality and Use of Medical Records

The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) governs the use and release of a patient's personal health information (PHI) also known as “protected health information”. It is imperative that all students and faculty with any access to a clinical setting comply with HIPAA rules and regulations. This includes understanding HIPAA and training in HIPAA that meets the clinical agency’s requirements. Patient privacy and confidentiality are ethical and legal obligations for nursing students. Students are legally responsible for following the rules outlined in HIPAA and FERPA and are subject to liability if they fail to adhere to these laws.

Violation of this policy will result in disciplinary action through the Department of Nursing which may include failure in a course and/ or dismissal from the program.

Social Media Policy

Activities on social media sites, private or via group, in any setting whether it is in a clinical or community that are deemed to be defamatory, harassing, obscene, profane, unprofessional, or in violation of any law will not be tolerated and are subject to disciplinary action. Inappropriate social media behaviors are strictly prohibited and will be handled through hearings with the Department Chair.

This policy applies specifically to the Department of Nursing and nursing students’ responsibility to protect client privacy and confidentiality at all times through all means of communication which includes social media and other communication channels. Confidential and sensitive information is protected under FERPA and HIPAA. Students are required to follow the protection outlined in these laws and under the guidelines identified in this policy. This policy follows the guidelines outlined in the National Council of State Boards of Nursing’s White Paper: A Nurse’s Guide to Use of Social Media (2018).

Policy

  • Protect sensitive and confidential client and clinical information at all times. Do not share, disseminate or post information, images, and other information gained in the nurse-client relationship with anyone outside of the immediate clinical requirements. If there is a client care related need to share this information, consult with your clinical faculty member.
  • Pre and Post conferences are learning experiences in which students may share with each other, under the guidance of their faculty member, specific clinical issues. Personal information needs to be protected even in these learning circumstances. It is expected that confidentiality will be maintained during the clinical conference and further discussion in a public forum is not to occur.
  • It is a violation of privacy to transmit by way of electronic media any client-related images. Do not take photos or videos of patients on personal devices, including cell phones.
  • If photographs are taken in the clinical setting/simulation as part of a clinical project, all required permission from the client and agency must be followed and the student must delete any electronic forms of these images. Posting or sharing of any images from a clinical or simulation experience online is not permitted. Students should avoid being in photographs taken by patients and family members while in the clinical setting.
  • Clinical experiences are not to be discussed in public places and via electronic media, even if patient and personal information are not identified; this includes and is not limited to social media sites, email, text, blogs, twitter, and class sites. Limiting access to postings through privacy settings will not ensure privacy.
  • Use of personal devices for social media requires permission from clinical faculty and must not violate privacy and confidentiality.
  • Students must follow the agency’s policy regarding cell phone use in the agency. Cell phones are to be silenced while in the clinical setting. Personal phone calls or texting are not permitted while in the client area.
  • Information concerning clients and their family, as well as, information regarding clinical rotations are not to be posted in any online forum.
  • Identification and discussion of health care institutions, staff, and community resources used in clinical or other nursing courses must be avoided. Any concerns about agencies used in nursing education must be shared with the department or an appropriate faculty member. Defamatory and malicious comments about agencies, the community, and resources within the community are not to be posted in any online forum.
  • Private health care information cannot be removed from the health care setting via paper or electronic devices such as computers, flash drives, personal devices, etc.
  • If a student identifies themselves as a Miami University nursing student on their Facebook or other online site, they should include a disclaimer that the views expressed do not represent Miami University or the Department of Nursing.
  • Patient privacy and confidentiality are ethical and legal obligations for nursing students. Students are legally responsible for following the rules outlined in HIPAA and FERPA and are subject to liability if they fail to adhere to these laws.
  • Violation of this policy will result in disciplinary action through the Department of Nursing which may include failure in a course and/ or dismissal from the program.
  • Students are legally liable for online posts and commentary deemed harassment, racist, obscene, libelous, defamatory, proprietary, or which violate copyright.
  • Future employers may conduct web searches prior to offering a nursing position. Professionalism in online posts can result in a positive outcome for the nursing applicant.

Accidents During Clinical Experiences

When a nursing student is injured (including a needle stick) during a clinical experience, she/he must immediately contact the preceptor and clinical/ practicum faculty. In most settings, the students may be sent to Student Health Services or Employee Health Services; or, if the injury is serious, the student may be sent to an Emergency Room. The student may also be asked to fill out paperwork specific to the agency at which the injury occurred. Additionally, the instructor should provide a copy of all paperwork to Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator. A copy will be placed in the student’s file.

Malpractice Insurance

The University provides all students enrolled at Miami University Department of Nursing with malpractice insurance which is provides coverage for the student during their hours of clinical or practicum courses. This policy does not cover students for anything outside of clinical/ practicum hours. It does not cover students when they are working. Miami University is self-insured. Blanket coverage is in effect for enrolled students in academic activities. Students who also hold professional licensure may wish to obtain additional malpractice insurance. If students have questions about the University’s insurance program, they may contact: Risk Management and Insurance.

Pregnancy

A student who is pregnant may continue in clinical practice as long as their health status is satisfactory and they are able to complete the clinical assignment. A note from their health care provider indicating safety of participation in clinical activities may be required. For the safety of the student who is pregnant, they must not enter where radioisotopes or x-ray therapy is being administered. Students who are pregnant should consult with their faculty member well in advance of their clinical assignment. Clinical agencies may have policies that determine the placement of students during pregnancy; assignments will be made accordingly.

Unexpected Events in Clinicals

Unexpected Events in Clinicals In all health care settings, events may occur in the environment or with an individual patient that may be outside of expected standards or procedures. If at any time a student has any questions or concerns during their placement, please reach out to faculty as soon as possible. If they are not available, please contact the clinical placement coordinator campb317@miamioh.edu.

campb317@miamioh.edu.

Student Expectations Checklist

  1. Begin onboarding training as soon as soon as you have been notified of a placement rather than waiting into the semester.
  2. Get started on your pre-placement activities. You cannot receive your placement until you have completed them. Please note that many of these activities will take effort to complete. It is best to start them as soon as possible. Pre-clinical or onboarding obligations may (but not always) include the following: 6-12 hours of webinar training on such topics as charting and HIPAA. A separate background check and/or fingerprinting.
  3. Wait to contact a placement site until you are cleared to do so.
  4. Once cleared, contact your preceptor immediately to arrange placement dates and times, even if the placement begins mid-semester.
  5. Alert the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator immediately of any change in your placement.
  6. Do not alter an established placement without specific approval from faculty and the Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator.
  7. Review your miamioh.edu e-mail frequently for communications regarding placements and compliance.
  8. Discuss any issues with your faculty or with the clinical placement administrator.
  9. Be sure to provide your phone contact information so that clinical placements can contact you with last-minute communications regarding alterations in placement.
  10. Avoid talking, texting, or communicating negative experiences about your preceptor or placement to others; but do communicate your concerns to your faculty and Graduate Clinical Placement Coordinator.
University Hall
CONTACT INFORMATION

Hamilton Campus

University Hall
1601 University Blvd.
Hamilton, OH 45011
513-785-7752

Oxford Campus

Clinical Health Sciences & Wellness Building
421 S. Campus Ave
Oxford, OH 45056
513-529-0298