Summer 2018 Session II Module List

Please note that this information is based on modules from the 2018 Summer Scholars Program. Each Summer Scholars Program is unique, and all modules are subject to change.
 

Art of Game Design

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Instructor:

Dr. Phill Alexander

Want to play a game? How about we MAKE a game? This summer course is an introduction to game design. Students will learn current and professional skills and techniques to create game systems and implement their creations in playable form. No previous art or computer experience is necessary. This introduction makes use of basic techniques that will teach you how to be creative using game design methodologies that are introduced in a way that is easy to understand. Students will learn by doing, taking a game from idea to playable. If you are curious about the art of video games, then level up your skills, creativity, and talent with this introduction!

 

Engineering Design:

Design and Build an Interactive Robot

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Design and Build an Interactive Robot

Instructor:

Jim Leonard

It's science. Not fiction. This summer, delve headfirst into the realms of engineering and computing by designing and building a computer-controlled robot. First, you'll learn how they communicate. Through the wires and steel runs a rich programming language that reads light sensors and controls drive motors. Next, you and your team will apply those concepts to the design of your own robotic vehicle. Your team will assemble it. Program it. Test it. Then, your robot will face off in performing its task against the other teams' creations. The winner will be crowned. The universe might be saved by building a computer-controlled robot.

 

The Entrepreneurial Experience:

Building Your Dreams and Passions into Fun and Profitable Ventures

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Building Your Dreams and Passions into Fun and Profitable Ventures

Instructor:

David Eyman

The secret to success in life and business can be found in the entrepreneurial mindset. The entrepreneurship track of the Summer Scholars Program exposes students to the fun and excitement of bringing ideas to life. Students will participate in interactive, hands-on projects where they will be exposed to what it takes to build companies, teams, and insight. Whatever your interests – building a small start-up company, creating a major corporation, driving meaningful social change, or working in creative fields – we will build ideas, form teams, and create the structure that builds success.

 

Force Field:

Applications and Science of Magnetism

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Applications and Science of Magnetism

Instructor:

Dr. Mahmud Khan

The invisible phenomenon of magnetism underpins much of our day-to-day life. Modern technology relies on the magnetic fields of machines and materials. The earth’s magnetic field protects us from the strong radiation emitted by the sun. Bullet trains travel at 300 mph on nearly frictionless rails. We will learn about the physics of magnetism through hands-on demonstrations including the visualization of magnetic field lines, designing electro-magnets and motors, a jump rope generator, and magnetic levitation of superconductors. Several core concepts of classical physics and quantum mechanics related to magnetism will also be discussed.

 

Game of Clones:

Genetic Engineering in Society

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Genetic Engineering in Society

Instructor:

Dr. Rebecca Balish

What fuels the debate surrounding genetically modified organisms in the United States? Are the choices people make when buying food based on scientific facts? Pseudoscience? Fear? We’ll explore topics related to the genetic engineering and in particular food crops in the United States, and compare attitudes of Americans to those of people living in other parts of the world. We’ll use molecular biology techniques in the laboratory to identify and generate our own genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

 

Inside State and Local Government:

Leadership and Public Affairs

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Leadership and Public Affairs

Instructor:

Dr. Mark Morris

Students interested in taking a leadership role in public affairs will focus on how public policy made in Washington, D.C. shapes the public agenda for state and local governments across the United States. From the sobering imperative of homeland security to the fascinating patchwork of interstate highways, streets, and roads, we’ll discover intricacies of the politics and economics inside state and local government.

Check out former projects.

 

Jumping Into Kinesiology: 

Evaluating Movement and its Benefits to Overall Health

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Evaluating Movement and its Benefits to Overall Health

Instructor:

Eric Slattery

This module will focus on how exercise is beneficial for health. Exercise is used in a therapeutic way by many health and fitness professionals around the world. This module will focus on how those professionals evaluate health and then decide what therapeutic treatments they will administer to improve client health. We will cover how health is defined, risk factors of health, what measures health professionals use to quantify/assess health, and steps that they can take to improve their physical health. These areas will largely include cardiorespiratory health and muscular health. Many of these assessments measure the same thing, particularly cardiorespiratory health, and students will learn about advantages and disadvantages of each test. Lab activities will include Blood Lipid Profile (Glucose, TC, LDL, HDL), body composition (height, weight, body fat, body water), electrocardiogram of the heart, functional movement screening, resistance exercise assessment, and graded exercise testing.

 

Lost Cities and Civilizations:

Archaeology and the Ancient World

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Archaeology and the Ancient World

Instructor:

Dr. Jeb Card

We'll discover the subtle clues and sensational treasures of ancient peoples from the earliest depths of prehistory to the great empires of Egypt and the Inka. We will learn how humans colonized the world, adapted to changing environments, transformed the landscape, and built new technologies and social orders to face daunting challenges. In the process we’ll analyze real artifacts, participate in the 3-D scanning and printing of artifacts, try our hand at how archaeologists excavate a site, decipher ancient hieroglyphs, figure out how old ancient Egyptian tombs are, and explore the role of archaeology today.

 

Media Matters:

Journalism in Action

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Journalism in Action

Instructor:

Patricia Gallagher Newberry

What does it take to make it as a journalist in the fast-paced, multimedia news industry today? Find out from journalists working at the front lines in southwest Ohio and around the country, as you create your own content about other Summer Scholars and learn about the many opportunities Miami offers to prepare you to produce 21st century journalism.

 

Pathways to the Helping Professions

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Instructor:

Dr. Jane Newell

Students will develop a strong foundational knowledge of basic theories used to understand family and family-like relationships through this experiential workshop. Based on this foundation, students will explore various helping professions (e.g., family life education, youth/family extension specialists, social work, marriage and family therapy, and child life specialists) via guest speakers working in each profession/area, field trips to local agencies/organizations, demonstrations, role-plays, and community service/shadowing experiences. At the completion of the workshop, students will have identified which helping professions are of interest and set goals for their individual pathways to the professions.

 

Search for the Cure:

The Discovery of Novel Anti-Cancer Agents

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The Discovery of Novel Anti-Cancer Agents

Instructor:

Dr. Michael Kennedy

Natural products from plants and mushrooms have been used for medical purposes for thousands of years. We are surrounded by natural products that have potential to treat important diseases like cancer, but have been unexplored. In this class, we will go into the field and collect mushroom and plant samples from our local forest and then prepare extracts and screen for anti-cancer activity using human pancreatic cancer cells. We will compare the activity of the extracts to the most commonly used chemotherapy agent, Gemcitabine. We will use molecular methods to identify the mushroom species, and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify the active compounds.

 

Studio Art:

Portfolios that Punch

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Portfolios that Punch

Instructor:

Matthew Litteken

Are you thinking of studying design or art in college, but you are nervous about your portfolio? Let us help! Studio Art - Portfolios that Punch is a college preparatory studio workshop for rising high school students geared at improving creative skills and constructing a competitive art portfolio for college admission. Outcomes focus on drawing and a variety of 3D studio-production approaches while emphasizing evaluative portfolio criteria including design/composition, technical proficiency, color, presentation, and photographic representation.
Studio sessions consist of artist lectures, studio-demonstrations, hands-on studio activities, outdoor drawing excursions and critical analysis of work created as well as the work of professional artists via campus galleries and museums all aimed at

 

Taking Care of Business

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Instructors:

Dr. Jeff Merhout
Helen Koons
Brenda Homan

What do people “do” in business? What makes a business successful? What does it take to be a business professional? The “Basics of Business” track of the Summer Scholars Program will allow students to investigate all of the functional areas of business, better understand business processes, and develop basic competency in the language of business. Students will work in competitive teams to solve a real-world business problem while thinking creatively and working collaboratively. Students will also have an opportunity to practice how to present in a professional environment.

 

Understanding the Human Brain:

Lessons Learned from Neuroscience Research

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Lessons Learned from Neuroscience Research

Instructors:

Dr. Joyce Fernandes

What do mice, fruit-flies, crabs, and chicks have in common? They are model organisms that scientists have used for decades to unravel the mysteries of life at the cellular and molecular level. The development of tools, techniques, and technologies play a crucial role in designing research studies that advance scientific knowledge. We will explore current problems in brain research, examine the development of neuro-technologies, and conduct projects to visualize and study cells of the nervous system. We will also become familiar with goals of the BRAIN Initiative®, which is aimed at revolutionizing our understanding of the brain.