Majors

The Department of Global and Intercultural Studies offers 5 majors.

American Studies

American Studies offers an interdisciplinary major that explores American culture, in all its complexity, from a variety of perspectives.

In learning to make connections between a range of fields and disciplines from history to art, politics to religious studies, mass media to popular culture, among many others, students gain a multifaceted understanding of the United States in global context.

The program fosters flexible thinking, creative problem solving skills, synthetic analysis, strong writing and oral presentation, an understanding of and familiarity with multiple kinds of media and texts, a broad understanding of social, cultural, and historical contexts, and intercultural awareness.

By working with faculty to define an area of concentration, students come away with the intellectual skills and perspective necessary to understand, contextualize, and critically engage the opportunities and challenges of our complex, changing, interdependent world.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Master the following critical thinking skills:
    • Demonstrate the skill of close reading of cultural texts and the ability to make meaningful connections between different kinds of texts;
    • Demonstrate the ability to use written communication and expression to analyze and synthesize multiple texts;
    • Demonstrate the ability to imagine and construct discourse to reach different audiences;
    • Demonstrate the ability to construct and present an analytical argument.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the diversity of U.S. culture in a global context
  3. Demonstrate an awareness of how American Studies frames arguments about culture by employing methods and sources from multiple fields and disciplines
  4. Demonstrate critical self-awareness and the ability to articulate the relationship between culture and one's individual beliefs and values
  5. Demonstrate the ability to identify and use analytical skills and knowledge necessary for engaged citizenship in a participatory democracy.

Critical Race and Ethnic Studies

The Critical Race and Ethnic Studies major fosters the critical and interdisciplinary study of race, ethnicity, and/or indigeneity in an increasingly interconnected world.

Students develop a deep understanding of the particular historical, social, cultural, and political experiences of individual racialized groups within and beyond the United States, as well as the relations among them.

Students choose one of three tracks: they may focus on one social group, or compare two of these groups, or create a self-designed thematic approach.

International Studies

This multidisciplinary program is for students desiring a broad foundation for understanding and analyzing important issues within an international and multicultural context.

Its flexible curriculum provides a basis for graduate work or careers in government service, international business, academia, tourism, public service, cultural relations, and law.

Overseas study is required as a part of this major.

Concentration Requirements

Africa

Africa is a regional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Africa Concentration
Course Title Hours
ART 309 The Arts of African Peoples 3
ART 335 Arts of West Africa 3
ATH 302 Africa: Anthropological Perspectives 3
ATH 329 Religions of Africa 3
ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions 3
BWS 156 Introduction to Africa 4
BWS 209 Civilization of Africa 3
BWS 243 History of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1400s to 1800s 3
BWS 324/HST 325 Images of Africa 3
BWS 339/POL 338 Contemporary African Politics 4
BWS 342 Africa Since 1945 3
BWS 385 Race, Science, and Disease in the Americas 3
BWS/ENG/FST/POR/WGS 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women 3
BWS/ENG/POR/FST 381 Culture and Arts in the Afro-Brazilian Diaspora 3
BWS/FST 267 National Cinemas: African Film 3
BWS/GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa 4
BWS/HST 224 Africa to 1884 3
BWS/HST 225 The Making of Modern Africa 3
BWS/HST 352 Medicine and Society in 20th Century Africa 3
BWS/HST 495 Modern African Environmental History
3
ITS 302 Problems of Non-Western Societies * 3
POL 438 Africa in the Global Economy 3

* May not double count towards ITS core credit hours

Conflict, Peace, & Diplomacy

Conflict, Peace, and Diplomacy is a functional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take mandatory course:

POL 271 - World Politics (3 hours, cannot double with core requirements)

Take remaining 2 courses from Groups A and B in the tables below, with no more than 1 course from Group B. You may take all 9 hours from group A. Distribute coursework among at least 2 different disciplines.


Group A Courses for Conflict, Peace, and Diplomacy Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 432 Secrecy, Sovereignty, & Power 3
ECO 441 International Trade and Commercial Policy 3
GIC 301

Approaches to Global and Intercultural Studies:
Globalization and Belonging

3
HST 222

U.S. Foreign Relations Since 1898 *

3
POL 221 Modern World Governments 3
POL 346 Global Gender Politics 3
POL 373 American Foreign Policy *
3
POL 374 Foreign Policy Analysis 3
POL 376 U.S. National Security Policy 3
POL 381 Global Governance 3
POL 382 International Law 3
POL 387 Comparative Security Issues 3
POL 471 The International System 3
POL 489 Conflict Management in a Divided World 3

* HST 222 and POL 373 may not both count.

Group B Courses for Conflict, Peace, and Diplomacy Concentration
Course Title Hours
ECO 341 Economic History of Modern Europe 3
HST 275 20th Century European Diplomacy 3
HST 301 Age of Revolutions, Europe 1750-1850 3
HST 318 British Empire 3
HST 332 Age of Dictators: Europe 1914-1945 3
HST 333 Reconstruction of Europe Since 1945 3
POL 339 Nationalism, Islam and Democracy in Arab Politics 3
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia 3
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World 3
POL 438 Africa in the Global Economy 3
REL 376 Global Militant Islamisms 3

Note: Some courses may have prerequisites or may be offered infrequently.

East & South Asia

East and South Asia is a regional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for East and South Asia Concentration
Course Title Hours
ART 286 China, Korea, and Japan 3
ART 311 Chinese Painting History 3
ART/JPN 279 Buddhism and Culture: China and Japan 4
ART 326 Modern & Contemporary East Asian Art 3
ATH 308 South Asia: Anthropological Perspectives 3
CHI 251 Traditional Chinese Literature in English Translation 3
CHI 252 Modern Chinese Literature in English Translation 3
CHI 253 Three Kingdoms 3
CHI 254 Modern Chinese Autobiography 3
CHI 257 Chinese Satire 3
CHI/FST 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture 3
CHI/JPN 255 Drama in China and Japan in Translation 3
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia 3
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia) 3
GEO 410 Advanced Regional Geography of Southeast Asia 3
GEO/ITS/SOC 208 The Rise of Industrialism in East Asia 3
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization
3
HST 354 Modern Chinese History 3
HST 356 Modern Japanese History 3
HST 383 Women in Chinese History 3
HST 434 China along the Silk Road before 1600 3
JPN 231 Japanese Tales of the Supernatural in English Translation 3
JPN/FST 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema 3
PHL 106 Thought and Culture of India 4
PHL 307 Gandhian Philosophy 3
POL 335 Politics of East Asia 3
POL 375 International Relations of East Asia 3
REL 223 Introduction to Buddhism 3

Global Cultural Relations

Global Cultural Relations is a functional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take a total of 9 semester hours from Groups A and B in the tables below, with no more than 1 course from Group B. You may take all 9 hours from group A. Distribute coursework among at least 2 different disciplines.

Note: A cross-listed course can represent any one of the disciplines for which it is cross-listed. For example, POL/WGS 346 can be used for the Political Science discipline, as well as Women's, Gender, and Sexuality discipline.


Group A Courses for Global Cultural Relations Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 175 Peoples of the World 3
ATH 231 Foundations of Cultural Anthropology 3
ATH 265 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology 3
ATH 345 Global Media, Ethnography, and Film 3
ATH 358 Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees 3
ATH 403/503 Anthropology of Religion 3
ATH 405/505 Food, Taste, Desire 3
ATH/ITS 301 Intercultural Relations * 3
ENG 369 Colonial and Postcolonial Literature 3
GIC 301 Approaches to Global and Intercultural Studies:
Globalization and Belonging
3
GTY 260 Global Aging 3
MGT 304 Cross Cultural Management 3
POL/WGS 346 Global Gender Politics 3
PSY 210 Psychology Across Cultures 3

* May not double count towards ITS core credit hours

Group B Courses for Global Cultural Relations Concentration
Course Title Hours
AMS 302 Immigrant America 3
AMS/FST/ITL 222 Italian American Culture 3
ATH 206/LAS 208 Introduction to Latin America 3
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives 3
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives 3
ATH 358 Travelers, Migrants and Refugees: Transnational Migration and Diasporic Communities 3
ATH/BWS 366 African Oral Traditions 3
ATH/GEO/RUS 306 Russia and Eurasia: Anthropological Perspectives 3
BWS 209 Civilization of Africa 3
BWS 324/HST 325 Images of Africa 3
BWS/FST 267 National Cinemas: African Film 3
BWS/FST/LAS 415 Cuba in Revolution: Its History, Politics, and Culture 4
BWS/HST 224 Africa to 1884 3
BWS/HST 225 The Making of Modern Africa 3
CHI/FST 264 Chinese Cinema and Culture 3
FRE/FST/GER 265 European Jewish Cinema 3
FST/ITL 262 Italian Cinema 3
FST/JPN 266 Survey of Japanese Cinema 3
FST/RUS 263 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russian Cinema 3
FST/RUS 272 Cultures and Identities of Eastern Europe 3
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia 3
GEO 311 Geography of Western Europe 3
GEO/ITS/SOC 208 Rise of Industrialism in East Asia 3
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe Since 1870 3
GER 322 Comparative Study of Everyday Culture: German-Speaking Europe and the U.S.A. 3
HST 318 British Empire 3
HST 346 Medieval Jewish History 3
HST 353 History of Chinese Civilization 3
HST 354 Modern Chinese History 3
HST 356 Modern Japanese History 3
LAS 315 Latin American Diaspora: Communities, Conditions and Issues 3
LAS/HST 260 Latin America in the United States 3
POL 339 Nationalism, Islam and Democracy in Arab Politics 3
REL 314 Social and Religious History of the Jewish People 3

Global Environment

The Global Environment is a functional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Global Environment Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 471 Ecological Anthropology 3
BUS/IES 494 Sustainability Perspectives in Resources and Business 3
BWS/HST 495 Modern African Environmental History 3
CPB 244 Introduction to Environmental Engineering 3
ECO 406 Environmental Economics 3
GEO 271 Human Dimensions of Natural Resource Conservation 3
GEO 333 Global Perspectives on Natural Disasters 3
GEO/WGS 436 Women, Gender and the Environment 3
HST/LAS 437 Latin America Environmental History 3
IES 211 Energy and Policy 3
IES 440 Contemporary Topics in Environmental Sciences 1-3
IES 450 Environmental Law 3
PHL 376 Environmental Philosophy 4

Global Human Rights & Justice

Global Human Rights & Justice is a functional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take these 2 mandatory courses:

  • SJS/SOC 165 - Introduction to Social Justice Studies (3 hours)
  • SJS/SOC 323 - Social Justice and Change (3 hours, prerequisite SJS/SOC 165)

Take remaining 6 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Global Human Rights and Justice Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 358 Travelers, Migrants, and Refugees: Transnational Migration and Diasporic Communities 3
ATH 428 Anthropology of Women’s Health 3
ATH 448 Developing Solutions in Global Health 3
BWS/HST/LAS 243 History of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1400s to 1800s 3
GEO/WGS 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment 3
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization 3
GEO 476 Global Poverty 3
GTY 260 Global Aging 3
HST/LAS 319 Revolution in Latin America 3
POL 381 Global Governance 3
POL 382 International Law 3
POL/WGS 346 Global Gender Politics 3
SJS 470 Social/Political Activism 3
SJS 487 Globalization, Social Justice, and Human Rights 3
SOC 305 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization 3
SOC 490 Current Issues in Sociology
(if topic is relevant)
1-3
SOC/WGS 203 Sociology of Gender 3

International Development

International Development is a functional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take a total of 9 semester hours from Groups A and B in the tables below, with no more than 1 course from Group B. You may take all 9 hours from group A. Distribute coursework among at least 2 different disciplines.


Group A Courses for International Development Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 348 Introduction to Medical Anthropology 3
ATH 428/528 Anthropology of Women's Health 3
ATH 448 Developing Solutions in Global Health 3
BUS 371 International Business 3
ECO 342 Comparative Economic Systems 3
ECO 344 International Economic Relations *
3
ECO 347 Economic Development 3
ECO 441 International Trade and Commercial Policy 3
ECO 442 International Monetary Relations 3
ESP 461 Small/Emerging Enterprise Consulting 3
ESP 464 Social Entrepreneurship 3
ESP 467 Entrepreneurship: New Ventures 3
GEO 205 Population and Migration 3
GEO 276 Geography of the Global Economy 3
GEO 457 Global Cities, World Economy 3
GEO 475 Global Periphery's Urbanization 3
GEO 476 Global Poverty 3
ITS 302 Problems of Non-Western Societies * 3
MGT 304 Cross Cultural Management 3
SOC 257 Population 3
SOC 305 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization 3

* May not double count towards ITS core credit hours

Group B Courses for International Development Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia 3
BWS/GEO 301 Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa 4
BWS/HST 225 The Making of Modern Africa 3
ECO 341 Economic History of Modern Europe 3
GEO 308 Geography of East Asia 3
HST 331 Industry and Empire: Europe from 1850 to 1914 3

Latin America

Latin America is a regional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Latin America Concentration
Course Title Hours
ART 317 The Arts of Colonial Latin America 3
ATH 206/LAS 208 Introduction to Latin America 3
ATH 305 Latin America: Anthropological Perspectives 3
ATH 313 Introduction to South American Archaeology 4
ATH 415 Caribbean Archaeology Field & Lab Methods 6
ATH/BWS/LAS/WGS 325 Identity, Race, Gender, Class 3
BWS/POR 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women 3
ENG 254 Latino/a Literature and the Americas 3
ENG/POR/FST/BWS 381 Culture and Arts in the Afro-Brazilian Diaspora 3
GEO 304 Latin American Development 4
HST 307 Latin American Civilization: The Colonial Period 3
HST/LAS 260 Latin America in the United States 3
HST/LAS/BWS 243 History of the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1400s to 1800s 3
LAS 207 Latin America before 1910 3
LAS 315 Latin American Diaspora: Communities, Conditions and Issues 3
LAS 410 Current Latin American Issues 3
LAS 424 Seminar on Modern Architecture in Latin America 3
LAS/BWS/FST 415 Cuba in Revolution 4
LAS/BWS/FST/ POR/MUS 204 Brazilian Culture Through Popular Music 3
LAS/GLG/IES 412 Tropical Ecosystems of Costa Rica 5
LAS/HST 319 Revolution in Latin America 3
LAS/HST 437 Latin American Environmental History 3
LAS/HST/BWS 385 Race, Science, and Disease in the Americas 3
LAS/IES 416 Connections:
Understanding Tropical Ecology and Natural History via Belize, Central America
5
LAS/SPN 332 Latin American Popular Culture 3
POL 337 Politics of Latin America 3
POL 378 Latin America: The Region and the World 3
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literatures 3
SPN 361 Spanish American Cultural History I 3
SPN 362 Spanish American Cultural History II 3
SPN 430 Selected Topics in Literature and Culture: Spanish America 3
SPN 461 Studies in Spanish American Narrative: Novel or Short Story 3
SPN 462 Studies in Modern Spanish American Drama 3
SPN 463 Studies in Spanish American Poetry 3
SPN 464 The Spanish American Essay 3

Middle East

Middle East is a regional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Middle East Concentration
Course Title Hours
ARB 230 Topics in Arabic Literature in Translation 3
ATH 307 The Middle East: Anthropological Perspectives 3
HST 241 Introduction to Islamic History 3
HST 242 The History of the Modern Middle East 3
HST 400 Senior Capstone in Middle East and Islamic History 3
POL 336 Politics of the Middle East 3
POL 339 Nationalism, Islam, and Democracy in Arab Politics 3
REL 226 Introduction to Islam 3
REL 286 Global Jewish Civilization 3
REL 312 Religions of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible 3
REL 314 Social and Religious History of the Jewish People 3
REL 376 Global Militant Islamisms 3

Russia, Eastern Europe, & Central Asia

Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia is a regional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Russia, Eastern Europe, and Central Asia Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 384 Anthropology of Capitalism: Russia 3
ATH/GEO/RUS 306 Peoples & Cultures of Russia 3
ATH/HST/POL/REL/RUS 254 Introduction to Russian and Eurasian Studies 3
ENG/RUS 255 Russian Literature from Pushkin to Dostoevsky in English Translation 3
FST/RUS 263 Soviet & Post-Soviet Russian Cinema 3
FST/RUS 272 Cultures & Identities of Eastern Europe:
An Introduction through Literature and Film
3
GEO 307 Geography of Central and Eastern Europe, and Russia 3
GEO 408 Geography of the Silk Road (The Heart of Asia) 3
HST 324 Eurasian Nomads and History 3
HST 374 History of the Russian Empire 3
HST 375 The Soviet Union and Beyond 3
HST 378 20th Century Eastern European History 3
HST 428 Russia's War and Peace 3
HST 470/570 Topics in Russian History 3
POL 230 Topics in Russian Culture and Civilization 3
POL 328 Politics of Central Asia 3
POL 331 Communism and Soviet Politics, 1917-1991 3
POL 332 Post-Soviet Russian Politics 3
POL 334 Politics of Eastern Europe 3
POL 430B Seminar on Political Systems of Russia and Eastern Europe 4-6
POL 488/588 Russia and the Republics in International Relations 3
POL/REL/RUS 133 Imagining Russia 3
RUS/ATH/HST/CLS 436/536
POL 440/540
REL 470A
Havighurst Colloquium 3
RUS 137 Russian Folklore 3
RUS 482/RUS 582 Russian, Eastern European and Eurasian Summer Workshop 3-6

Western Europe

Western Europe is a regional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Western Europe Concentration
Course Title Hours
ART 314 Italian Renaissance 3
ART 315 High Renaissance and Mannerist Art 3
ART 316 Baroque Art in Europe 3
ART 386 Art of the Weimar Republic 3
ART 486 Art of the Late 19th Century 3
ART 487 Art of the Early 20th Century 3
ART 488 Art in the Age of Revolution: 1789-1848 3
ATH 335L Multiculturalism in Europe: Anthropological Perspectives 3
ATH/IES/GEO 409 Sustainability in Europe 3
ECO 341 Economic History of Modern Europe 3
ENG 251,252 Life and Thought in European Literature 3
ENG 339 Writers of the Early Romantic Period 3
ENG 342 Writers of the Later Romantic Period 3
ENG 343 English Literature of the Early Victorian Period, 1830-1860 3
ENG 344 English Literature of the Later Victorian Period, 1860-1901 3
FRE 350 Topics in French Literature in Translation 3
FRE 411 French Civilization 3
FRE 431 Studies in Contemporary French Thought in Translation 3
FRE/FST 366 French Cinema in Translation 3
FRE/GER/FST 265 European Jewish Cinema 3
FST/GER 261 German Cinema 3
FST/ITL 262 Italian Cinema in English Translation 3
GEO 311 Geography of Western Europe 4
GER 321 Cultural Topics in German-Speaking Europe Since 1870 3
GER 322 The Comparative Study of Everyday Culture:
German-Speaking Europe and the USA
3
HST 245 The Making of Modern Europe, 1450-1750 3
HST 270 Topics in European History 1-4
HST 275 20th Century European Diplomacy 3
HST 301 Age of Revolutions, Europe 1750-1850 3
HST 313 History of England to 1688 3
HST 332 Age of Dictators: Europe 1914-1945 3
HST 333 Reconstruction of Europe Since 1945 3
HST 339 Jews in Modern France:
Between Image and Experience
3
HST 346 Medieval Jewish History 3
HST 378 20th Century Eastern European History 3
HST 472 Germany 1918-1945 3
ITL 221 Italy, Matrix of Civilization 3
ITL/ENG 401 Dante's Divine Comedy 3
POL 333 Politics of Western Europe 3
POL 423 European Union: Politics and Policies 3
SPN 315 Introduction to Hispanic Literatures 3
SPN 351 Cultural History of Spain I 3
SPN 352 Cultural History of Spain II 3
SPN 381 Language and Culture I 3
SPN 452 Studies in Spanish Poetry 3
SPN 454 Don Quixote 3

Women in the World

Women in the World is a functional concentration that meets the concentration requirement for the ITS major.

Take 9 semester hours, representing at least 2 different disciplines, from the following courses.


Courses for Women in the World Concentration
Course Title Hours
ATH 428/528 Anthropology of Women's Health 3
BWS/WGS/POR 383 By or About (Afro-) Brazilian Women 3
GEO/WGS 436 Women, Gender, and the Environment 3
HST 383 Women in Chinese History 3
PHL/WGS 355 Feminist Theory 4
POL/WGS 346 Global Gender Politics 3
REL/WGS 333 Religion, Dress, and Status 3
SOC/WGS 203 Sociology of Gender Roles 3
SOC 305 Introduction to the Sociology of Globalization 3
WGS 201 Introduction to Women's Studies 3
WGS/AAA/REL 313 Marriage Across Cultures 3
WGS/AAA/ENG 351 Cultural Politics of Gender and Sexuality in Asian/America 3

Frequently Asked Questions

I would like to study Korean to fulfill my language proficiency requirement in ITS. However, I noticed in the Miami Bulletin that Korean is not offered at the 300 level. The ITS requirements state that I need 6 credits at the 300 level. How can I meet the requirement?

For languages like Korean and Hindi, etc. that are not offered at the 300 level, students are expected to choose a study abroad program that includes upper level language courses so that the requirement can be completed while abroad.

Do I have to study abroad for an entire semester, or can I do 2 summer programs instead?

The ITS program requires an entire semester of study abroad. There is a petition process for the rare exception to the semester study abroad requirement. If you wish to file a petition, you should first meet with the program director or the chief program advisor to see if you qualify.

I am an upper class student who has decided to change my major to ITS. Can I still graduate in 4 years?

That generally depends on where you place in foreign language. If you begin a new language at the 101 level, you will need 6 to 8 semesters to complete that requirement. You will also need to spend a semester abroad.

I have a double major in French and ITS. Do I have to take the ITS capstone, or can I take the French capstone instead?

You have to take the ITS capstone. You should check with the French department to see if they also require you to take theirs or if they will accept the ITS capstone. Many double majors have to take 2 capstones.

I am an international student from China. Do I also have to study abroad?

As an international student, a semester at Miami University counts as your study abroad but students are encouraged to consider a study abroad experience.

Learning Outcomes

At graduation, we expect that our majors can:

  1. Develop interdisciplinary explanations of global problems;
  2. Propose contextualized policy solutions;
  3. Operate effectively in a foreign culture;
  4. Write and present professionally.

Latin American, Latino/a, and Caribbean Studies

City of Cienfuegos, Cuba (study tour Cuba in Transition 2018)

Latin American Latino/a & Caribbean Studies offer an interdisciplinary major based in mutually enriching perspectives in the humanities, fine arts, social and physical sciences. Information about the LAS minor can be found on the GIC minors page.

Courses examine and analyze Latin American and Caribbean cultures, economies, social and political systems, literature, art, music, history, and geography across the hemisphere.

Opportunities to study abroad and to engage with Latin American communities in Ohio promote the active application of international knowledge to issues vital to today's changing world.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will attain familiarity with Latin American and Latino cultures and experiences that lead them to act as informed and engaged global citizen.
  2. Students will be able to discern the validity of popular and scholarly sources and arguments addressing contentious Latin American and Latino issues.
  3. Students will be able to select appropriate disciplinary and interdisciplinary methodologies, identify useful sources, and collect necessary data to complete a significant analytical research project.
  4. Students will present persuasively and accurately the results of their research in written and oral formats aimed at various audiences.

Writing in LAS

This resource provides a brief introduction to writing in the field of Latin American, Latino/a, and Caribbean Studies through the lens of threshold concepts. It includes:

  1. an overview of what writing characteristics are valued in LAS
  2. examples of the varied writing genres and practices common in LAS
  3. a brief discussion of how writing in LAS develops critical consciousness

What Are Core Values in LAS?

The Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies Program at Miami University brings together faculty and research interests from across academic disciplines to study the histories, politics, cultures, and societies of Latin America, the Caribbean, and Latinx communities in the United States. Our program embraces research, linguistic knowledge, fieldwork, and direct engagement as essential to critical consciousness and empowerment. By engaging with diverse writing genres and practices, our students learn about the changing political, social, economic and cultural realities of the hemisphere, including:

  • imperialism, nationalism, and regionalism
  • transnationalisms, migrations, and displacements
  • collective action, social movement, and social change
  • intersectionality, identities, and inequalities
  • culture-, power-, knowledge-production
  • engaged citizenship and community empowerment

Through a scaffolded, problem-solving approach to writing, students acquire and strengthen skills in any of the following areas: business, commerce, community advocacy, public policy, health care, education, journalism, media, and higher education.

How Do the Variety of Genres Offered throughout the Curriculum Develop These Values?

LAS students are introduced to a variety of writing genders at different levels across courses. The writing genres of our gateway courses, LAS 208, LAS 254, and LAS 260, introduce historical perspective, contemporary awareness, and an array of core concepts necessary to study the region and its diaspora. Depending on the course, students get familiarized with writing interviews, cultural reviews, personal reflections, audiovisual presentations, and website content to gain a critical perspective of the region and its diaspora.

Students continue to build on the core concepts on LAS 217 and 243, courses developed around broad themes, such as nationalism, imperialism, and slavery. In general, the writing assignments for these courses take the form of primary source analysis, response papers, and brief essays that do not involve independent research. Through them students gain the ability to offer an informed interpretation of primary evidence, identify different methodological perspectives, and appreciate how knowledge is produced.

The specialized courses at the 300 level are country specific or organized around a narrow theme. Students of LAS 315, 319, 332, 360, 385, and 390 build a foundation and literacy in research methods. Writing assignments in these courses foster students' ability to identify a scholarly conversation, to formulate their own arguments, and to locate both arguments in the context of the field. In these courses, students may write an annotated bibliography to define the shape of scholarship on a subject and develop advanced library skills, a podcast script or debate presentation to translate a scholarly argument in an oral form to a non-academic audience, a community-based project to integrate academic goals and experiential learning, or an interpretive toolkit essay to examine the various methods and narratives scholars have used to approach the topic.

In the capstone course students design, implement, and write an original research project based on primary sources or fieldwork. Capstone students learn to become particularly attuned to the different writing genres—and audiences—that different disciplines and professions employ to address an issue or problem, and to begin to imagine alternative futures. Students demonstrate awareness of the ways that different genres reach different audiences and learn to master conveying an idea across a range of registers. Examples of genres include a policy recommendation, a community action project, public scholarship in the form of a blog post or pamphlet, visual scholarship in the form of film or a poster, or a research paper.

How Does Writing in LAS Develop Critical Consciousness and Engaged Citizenship?

Through writing in LAS, students critically engage various sources, including:

  • scholarly texts
  • art
  • songs
  • historical documents
  • public presentations
  • personal narratives
  • material culture (objects)
  • study abroad experiences

Engaging with these types of sources helps students to understand them within their respective historical, cultural, linguistic, and political contexts. In free writing exercises, formal academic expositions, policy briefs, and blog posts, students grasp the "big picture," positioning empires, hierarchies of power, and the politics of scale at the core of everyday life for Latin American and Caribbean peoples across the world.

This practice of writing not only allows students to understand the systemic injustices faced by Latin American and Caribbean people, but also fosters a critical consciousness of our own positionalities within these structures of power. We hope that by recognizing that their own narratives are emerging within the context of the United States, students are able to develop a sense of social responsibility and compassion for others, leading them to direct action and engagement with advocacy, policy, or activist efforts across a range of civil, human, and environmental rights issues.

This writing guide was developed by the LAS Junta Democrática with the generous support of the Howe Center for Writing Excellence.

Alejandro A. Garrote Memorial Scholarship

Scholarships in memory of LAS student Alejandro Garrote are awarded annually, contingent on the availability of funds and on the student demonstrating financial need (a FAFSA for the current year must be on file), to LAS majors and minors desiring to study in abroad, mainly Latin America.

The Garrote Scholarship is open to outstanding undergraduates who seek an opportunity to advance scholarship in Latin American, Latino/a and Caribbean Studies. The goals of the scholarship are to:

  • give undergraduates experience with active research
  • promote collaboration with LAS faculty and affiliates
  • facilitate attending LAS-related workshops

Amount of the fellowship varies, but in the past students have received between $250 and $1,500 to fund their projects.

An eligible student must:

  • be a LAS major or minor
  • have a FASFA on file (need-bases scholarship)
  • participate in a for-credit program

Applying

Application materials are:

  • description of your project or workshop
  • explanation of your overall career goal
  • name and email of a reference
  • current resume

Submit your application materials by email to Juan Carlos L. Albarrán (albarrjl@MiamiOH.edu). Please use "GARROTE SCHOLARSHIP APPLICATION" in the subject line of your message.

Applications are accepted and awards are given on a rotating basis throughout the school year. Contact a LAS Advisor for more information:

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies

Women's Gender, and Sexuality Studies is an interdisciplinary major that investigates how our lives are affected by gender race, class, age, sexuality, religion, (dis)ability, gender identity, and nationality.

Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies emphasizes the importance of understanding gender as a part of wider social and political structures of power, knowledge, experience, culture, embodiedness, intimacy, and labor.

Courses are organized around contemporary feminist research and theory, and focus intersectionally on women, gender, and sexuality as subjects of inquiry. Our coursework also focuses on how theory and practice come together. Students may choose from courses spanning departments, disciplines, divisions and ideologies.

The Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program provides a context in which women's work and women's issues are explored in-depth, celebrating women's creativity, women's lives, and women's work. In Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, students find an active and supportive community, close interaction with faculty, opportunities to take on leadership roles, and an academic program that allows them to cross the traditional disciplinary boundaries.

Flexibility of the major requirements allows you to design a program to suit your needs and interests. This major prepares you for graduate or professional school and for a career in research and writing, a nonprofit agency, public policy, social services, business, law, education, or communication.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Students will be able to identify the modes of inquiry typical of a variety of interdisciplinary scholarship and apply these modes of inquiry in a number of genres typical of interdisciplinary knowledge dissemination.
  2. Students will be able to demonstrate the academic writing process, which begins with rigorous habits of thinking, reading, interpreting, data gathering, analyzing, discussing, and arguing.
  3. Students will be able to communicate effectively and responsibly to a public audience regarding topical matters involving intersectional issues relevant to WGS.
  4. Students will be able to construct an analytical, comparative, and evidence-based argument that demonstrates both thoughtful synthesis of multiple sources and a keen awareness of context, purpose, and audience.