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Honors Courses for First Year Students

Academic Divisions:

College of Arts and Science

Anthropology Majors:

ATH 180: Apes Behavior and Conservation
MW 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Kelsey Ellis CRN 18634, 3 Credit Hours
This course offers an introduction to the biology, behavior, culture, and conservation of great apes around the world. Through a comparative lens, and using examples from both captive and wild populations, students will explore behavioral similarities and differences among the great apes (and ourselves). Importantly, students will examine the biological, anthropogenic, and abiotic threats facing great apes today, and the ecosystems in which they live, and discuss the conservation strategies used to combat those threats and increase their chances of survival.

ATH 185H: Cultural Diversity in the US
TR 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by staff
CRN 18906, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Anthropological and ethnographic approaches to the study of cultural, social, and linguistic variation in the United States, its territories, and borderlands. As an introduction to cultural anthropology, the course provides a foundation for understanding historical and contemporary contexts related to globalization and diaspora; ethnic, racial, and class identities; political economy and environment; belief systems; and ethnographic methodology.


Biology, Botany, Medical Laboratory Science, Microbiology, and Zoology Majors:

BIO/MBI 116H: Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology
Multiple sections with different meeting times, Taught by Rebecca Balish, 4 credit hours
Course description:Biological principles common to microbes, plants, and animals, including interactions between organism and environment

MTH 135H: Math for Science Applications*
2 sections with different meeting times, taught by Olga Brezhneva, 3 credit hours
Course description: Taught at the precalculus level, the course focuses on concepts and examples from chemistry, physics, and biology to give students practice with problems they will encounter in natural science courses. Being multidisciplinary by nature, the course prepares students knowledge and skills to tackle real-world problems and for analysis of global issues such as climate and temperature changes, spread of infectious diseases, and drinking water availability. Enhanced with MCAT practice problems, the course also gives additional motivation for students interested in premedical studies.


CAS Economics Majors:

ECO 201H: Principles of Microeconomics- Honors
MWF 9:20am-10:15am, taught by Charles Moul
CRN 10742 3 credit hours
Course Description: Nature and scope of microeconomics, including the role of the market in resource allocation, the role of competition, market forces, the forces governing the distribution of income, and the role of foreign trade in economic welfare. While the only required math is basic algebra, the Honors sections make heavy and constant use of it to complement qualitative and graphical analysis. Students who have completed calculus (either by AP or at the college level) tend to manage this more easily, although it is not required to take the course. The business course surcharge is applied to first-time undergraduate students enrolled Fall 2021 or later.

MTH 151H: Calculus I
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Anna Ghazaryan
CRN 17064, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, and early integration techniques of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It is expected that students have completed a trigonometry or pre-calculus course and possess the following prerequisite knowledge: factoring polynomials, working with fractional exponents, finding the domain of functions, properties of common functions such as polynomial, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions, solving a variety of types of equations, inverse functions, graphing, and other related topics.

OR 

MTH 251H: Calculus II*
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Alim Sukhtayev
CRN 18475. 4 credit hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I. Plane analytic geometry, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, approximations, applications. Credit not awarded for both MTH 249 and 251. CAS-E. Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in MTH 151.


Chemistry and Biochemistry Majors:

Discuss your math placement with your divisional advisor.

CHM 141H: Col Chemistry- Honors
MWF 8am-8:55am, taught by staff
CRN 11917, 3 credit hours
Course Description: MPF General chemistry lecture course. Examines the fundamentals of atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, properties of solutions, thermochemistry, gasses, and chemical bonding. Students also develop ideas, experience, methodology, and skills used in the application of scientific methodology. Credit not given for both CHM 141R and 141. IVB, LAB. Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry and a math ACT score of 22 (or a SAT math subscore 530) or higher or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHM 144.

MTH 135H: Math for Science Applications*
2 sections with different meeting times, taught by Olga Brezhneva, 3 credit hours
Course description: Taught at the precalculus level, the course focuses on concepts and examples from chemistry, physics, and biology to give students practice with problems they will encounter in natural science courses. Being multidisciplinary by nature, the course prepares students knowledge and skills to tackle real-world problems and for analysis of global issues such as climate and temperature changes, spread of infectious diseases, and drinking water availability. Enhanced with MCAT practice problems, the course also gives additional motivation for students interested in premedical studies.

MTH 151H: Calculus I
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Anna Ghazaryan
CRN 17064, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, and early integration techniques of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It is expected that students have completed a trigonometry or pre-calculus course and possess the following prerequisite knowledge: factoring polynomials, working with fractional exponents, finding the domain of functions, properties of common functions such as polynomial, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions, solving a variety of types of equations, inverse functions, graphing, and other related topics.

MTH 251H: Calculus II*
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Alim Sukhtayev
CRN 18475. 4 credit hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I. Plane analytic geometry, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, approximations, applications. Credit not awarded for both MTH 249 and 251. CAS-E. Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in MTH 151.

MTH 252H: Calculus III*
MWF 8:30am-9:45am, taught by Daniel Pritikin
CRN 17062, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I and II. Three-dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, derivatives, multiple integrals, applications. The honors course offers an in-depth treatment of these topics.


Data Science & Statistics Majors:

Discuss your math placement with your divisional advisor.

MTH 151H: Calculus I
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Anna Ghazaryan
CRN 17064, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, and early integration techniques of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It is expected that students have completed a trigonometry or pre-calculus course and possess the following prerequisite knowledge: factoring polynomials, working with fractional exponents, finding the domain of functions, properties of common functions such as polynomial, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions, solving a variety of types of equations, inverse functions, graphing, and other related topics.

MTH 222H: Introduction To Linear Algebra*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Ivonne Ortiz
CRN 17059, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Introduction to Linear Algebra (3) Treatment with emphasis on Euclidean spaces and matrix algebra: systems of linear equations, elementary matrix operations, determinants, vector methods in geometry, vector spaces, and linear transformations.

MTH 251H: Calculus II*
2 Different sections at different times, taught by staff, 5 credit hours
Course description: Offers a review of fundamental concepts of MTH 151 followed by content of Calculus II. Topics include plane analytic geometry, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, approximations, applications. Admission to the honors course requires honors standing or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Credit not awarded for both MTH 249 and 251.

Discuss placement in this course with your divisional advisor in light of your placement and any math credit you expect from dual enrollment coursework, AP, or IB scores.

MTH 252H: Calculus III*
MWF 8:30am-9:45am, taught by Daniel Pritikin
CRN 17062, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I and II. Three-dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, derivatives, multiple integrals, applications. The honors course offers an in-depth treatment of these topics.

AMS 205H: Intro to American Studies
WF 11:40am-1pm, taught by Kathleen Kollman
CRN 18372, 3 credit hours
Course description: Explores what it means to be "American." As an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and identities, past and present, it examines key ideas, events, texts, images, objects, places, and other reflections of American cultures and identities. Students will consider how the meaning and significance of American and American identity has been defined, discussed and debated from multiple perspectives. The honors section will explore the breadth of American studies but with a special topic emphasis on indigenous identities, Native tribal sovereignty, and in particular historical and contemporary indigenous cultures in the greater Miami Valley region as well as representations of Native identity in popular culture.


English: Literature Majors:

ENG 125H: Introduction To Drama
TR 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Kathleen Johnson
CRN 18227, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course gives students an introduction to, and practice in, critical analysis of dramatic literature, from the ancient Greeks to modern Pulitzer-prize winning plays. Students will read plays such as Oedipus the King, Hamlet, The Hairy Ape, A Jury of Her Peers, Death of a Salesman, A Raisin in the Sun, Angels in America and more. Students will learn how drama is used to grapple with real-life crises and will consider the performative nature of drama by exploring how various plays get staged, re-staged, filmed, and revised over time. Students will examine the larger cultural contexts and historical relevance of producing and consuming drama. Students will also actively engage drama texts through small group work, discussions (online and in-class), creative projects, and writing assignments.


Geology and Environmental Earth Science Majors:

GLG 111H: The Dynamic Earth
MW 2:50pm-4:10pm, taught by Maija Sipola
CRN 14958, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Earth as a geophysical-geochemical unit and its internal and external processes. Formation of minerals and their relationships in rocks. Earth stresses and rock deformation, mountain building, and earthquakes. Geomorphic (landscape) evolution by mass wasting and wave, stream, wind, ground water, glacial, and volcanic activity.

CHM 141H: Col Chemistry- Honors
MWF 8am-8:55am, taught by staff
CRN 11917, 3 credit hours
Course Description: MPF General chemistry lecture course. Examines the fundamentals of atomic and molecular structure, chemical reactions and stoichiometry, properties of solutions, thermochemistry, gasses, and chemical bonding. Students also develop ideas, experience, methodology, and skills used in the application of scientific methodology. Credit not given for both CHM 141R and 141. IVB, LAB. Prerequisite: one year of high school chemistry and a math ACT score of 22 (or a SAT math subscore 530) or higher or permission of instructor. Co-requisite: CHM 144.

MTH 135H: Math for Science Applications*
2 different meeting times, taught by Olga Brezhneva, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Concepts, terminology and problem-solving skills important in chemistry, physics, and biology. Ratios and proportions, significant figures, scientific notation, moles and molarity, linear, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometry, vectors, algebraic systems, rates of change, and elements of probability and statistics with focus on using these topics in science applications. Qualitative reasoning is emphasized and quantitative problem-solving skills are developed.

MTH 151H: Calculus I
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Anna Ghazaryan
CRN 17064, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, and early integration techniques of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It is expected that students have completed a trigonometry or pre-calculus course and possess the following prerequisite knowledge: factoring polynomials, working with fractional exponents, finding the domain of functions, properties of common functions such as polynomial, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions, solving a variety of types of equations, inverse functions, graphing, and other related topics.


Film Studies Co-Majors:

FST 201H: Film History and Analysis
MW|T 11:40am-1:00pm|5:00pm-7:00pm, taught by Kerry Hegarty
CRN 16974, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Introduction to basic principles of cinematic form and to major movements and issues in the history of cinema. Primary emphasis given to principal methods of critical thinking in film studies, from close analysis of formal and stylistic elements in a single film to more global ways of understanding and interpreting films within their aesthetic, social, historical, and political contexts. Includes screenings of representative films, lectures, discussions, group activities, papers, and exams.


Mathematics and Math & Statistics Majors:

Discuss your math placement with your divisional advisor.

MTH 151H: Calculus I
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Anna Ghazaryan
CRN 17064, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, and early integration techniques of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It is expected that students have completed a trigonometry or pre-calculus course and possess the following prerequisite knowledge: factoring polynomials, working with fractional exponents, finding the domain of functions, properties of common functions such as polynomial, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions, solving a variety of types of equations, inverse functions, graphing, and other related topics.

MTH 222H: Introduction To Linear Algebra*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Ivonne Ortiz
CRN 17059, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Treatment with emphasis on Euclidean spaces and matrix algebra: systems of linear equations, elementary matrix operations, determinants, vector methods in geometry, vector spaces, and linear transformations.

MTH 251H: Calculus II*
2 Different sections at different times, taught by staff, 5 credit hours
Course description: Offers a review of fundamental concepts of MTH 151 followed by content of Calculus II. Topics include plane analytic geometry, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, approximations, applications. Admission to the honors course requires honors standing or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Credit not awarded for both MTH 249 and 251.
Discuss placement in this course with your divisional advisor in light of your placement and any math credit you expect from dual enrollment coursework, AP, or IB scores.

MTH 252H: Calculus III*
MWF 8:30am-9:45am, taught by Daniel Pritikin
CRN 17062, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I and II. Three-dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, derivatives, multiple integrals, applications. The honors course offers an in-depth treatment of these topics.

AMS 205H: Introduction to American Studies
WF 11:40am-1pm, taught by Kathleen Kollman
CRN 18372, 3 credit hours
Course description: Explores what it means to be "American." As an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and identities, past and present, it examines key ideas, events, texts, images, objects, places, and other reflections of American cultures and identities. Students will consider how the meaning and significance of American and American identity has been defined, discussed and debated from multiple perspectives. The honors section will explore the breadth of American studies but with a special topic emphasis on indigenous identities, Native tribal sovereignty, and in particular historical and contemporary indigenous cultures in the greater Miami Valley region as well as representations of Native identity in popular culture.


Philosophy Majors:

PHL 103H: Society and the Individual*
MW 10:05am-11:25am, taught by staff
CRN 17126, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: A study of the relationship between human beings and the societies in which they live and of the implications different perspectives on this relationship have for a view of social justice. We investigate this relation in terms of its political, economic, social, ethical, and epistemological dimensions. Introduces fundamental questions of philosophy and basic reasoning skills, methodologies, and concepts used by philosophers. Students are prepared for further work in philosophy and develop skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing for any area of learning.

PHL 273H: Formal Logic*
MWF 10:05am-11:20am, taught by Michael Hicks
CRN 18912, 4 credit hours
Course description: Survey of elementary logical systems: Aristotelian, Boolean, sentential, quantified. Scientific method and issues in the philosophy of logic may be included.

PHL 301H: Ancient Philosophy*
MW 11:40am-1:30pm, taught by Pascal Massie
CRN 18907, 4 credit hours
Course description: Survey of ancient philosophical thought covering pre-Socratics, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Hellenistic philosophy. Problems discussed include the nature of being and becoming, monism and pluralism, knowledge, value, and society. Emphasis given to philosophies of Plato and Aristotle.

PHL 310H: Action and Responsibility*
TR 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by
CRN 18909, 3 credit hours
Course description: Reflections on basic philosophical questions about agency. Topics include intentional action, acting for reasons, rationality, weakness and strength of will, trying, autonomous agency, and responsibility. Emphasis on their connection to foundational issues in criminal law -- mens rea and criminal responsibility, completed v. attempted crimes, etc. This course counts toward the Philosophy and Law minor and toward the Ethics, Society, and Culture minor.


Physics, Biological Physics, Engineering Physics Majors:

Discuss your math placement with your divisional advisor.

MTH 151H: Calculus I
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Anna Ghazaryan
CRN 17064, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, and early integration techniques of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It is expected that students have completed a trigonometry or pre-calculus course and possess the following prerequisite knowledge: factoring polynomials, working with fractional exponents, finding the domain of functions, properties of common functions such as polynomial, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions, solving a variety of types of equations, inverse functions, graphing, and other related topics.

MTH 222H: Introduction To Linear Algebra*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Ivonne Ortiz
CRN 17059, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Treatment with emphasis on Euclidean spaces and matrix algebra: systems of linear equations, elementary matrix operations, determinants, vector methods in geometry, vector spaces, and linear transformations.

MTH 251H: Calculus II*
2 Different sections at different times, taught by staff, 5 credit hours
Course description: Offers a review of fundamental concepts of MTH 151 followed by content of Calculus II. Topics include plane analytic geometry, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, approximations, applications. Admission to the honors course requires honors standing or permission of the instructor. Enrollment limited to first-year students. Credit not awarded for both MTH 249 and 251.

Discuss placement in this course with your divisional advisor in light of your placement and any math credit you expect from dual enrollment coursework, AP, or IB scores.

MTH 252H: Calculus III*
MWF 8:30am-9:45am, taught by Daniel Pritikin
CRN 17062, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I and II. Three-dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, derivatives, multiple integrals, applications. The honors course offers an in-depth treatment of these topics.

AMS 205H: Introduction to American Studies
WF 11:40am-1pm, taught by Kathleen Kollman
CRN 18372, 3 credit hours
Course description: Explores what it means to be "American." As an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and identities, past and present, it examines key ideas, events, texts, images, objects, places, and other reflections of American cultures and identities. Students will consider how the meaning and significance of American and American identity has been defined, discussed and debated from multiple perspectives. The honors section will explore the breadth of American studies but with a special topic emphasis on indigenous identities, Native tribal sovereignty, and in particular historical and contemporary indigenous cultures in the greater Miami Valley region as well as representations of Native identity in popular culture.


Political Science Majors:

POL 221H: Comparative Politics
TR 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Venelin Ganev
CRN 18419, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Comparative introduction to the development, governmental structures, and political processes of societies in the modern world. Case studies used to relate theories to actual problems and governing strategies in contemporary political systems. Students in the honors section read important texts that are not assigned in the non-Honors version of the course, receive detailed feedback on their written assignments, and participate in more and lengthier class discussions.


Premedical and Pre-Health Studies Co-Majors:

BIO/MBI 116H: Biological Concepts: Structure, Function, Cellular, and Molecular Biology
Multiple sections with different meeting times, Taught by Rebecca Balish, 4 credit hours
Course description:Biological principles common to microbes, plants, and animals, including interactions between organism and environment

MTH 135H: Math for Science Applications*
2 different meeting times, taught by Olga Brezhneva, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Service course. Concepts, terminology and problem-solving skills important in chemistry, physics, and biology. Ratios and proportions, significant figures, scientific notation, moles and molarity, linear, quadratic, logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometry, vectors, algebraic systems, rates of change, and elements of probability and statistics with focus on using these topics in science applications. Qualitative reasoning is emphasized and quantitative problem-solving skills are developed.

AAA/REL 203H: Religions of India
WF 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Elizabeth Wilson
2 sections, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: How can adherents of selected Asian religions (Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism) best be accommodated in American schools, hospitals, and corporate workplaces? What does a future teacher, medical professional, or business person need to know to meet the needs of patrons who practice Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism? The class will focus on three workplaces and three religions. In this experiential learning class, you’ll visit a Hindu temple, a Muslim mosque, and a Sikh temple. You’ll conduct interviews with Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs who work in vocational settings such as schools, hospitals, and corporations.  Students will select one workplace and one religion as their research focus. This course is ideal for students training for medical careers, K-12 educational careers, and careers in business.


Psychology Majors:

PSY 293H: Intro Psychological Statistics*
TR|MW 4:25pm-5:20pm|8:30am-9:50am, taught by Staff
CRN 19296, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Provides an introduction to analyzing, interpreting, and reporting results in psychological research. It prepares students to analyze data. Topics include descriptive and inferential statistics
Prerequisite: STA 261 (Statistics).


Spanish Majors:

SPN 311H: Grammar Rvw& Intro Composition*
WF 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Katherine Fowler-Cordova
CRN 18586, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Continued development of basic grammatical proficiency in Spanish with an introduction to the fundamentals of writing in the Spanish language. Prerequisite: SPN 202, SPN 203, SPN 211 or appropriate placement exam score.
This is the first course in the Spanish Major or Minor. Students enrolled in the Honors section will be responsible for leading discussions and presenting to the class about the events that they have attended that related to topics examined in the class. 

SPN 315H: Intro to Hispanic Literatures*
TR 11:40am-1:00pm, taught by Luis Pradanos-Garcia
CRN 18587, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Close reading and critical analysis of selected poetry, essay, narrative fiction, and drama from Spain and Latin America. The Honors version of the course will connect presentations organized by the Humanities Center Altman Program on the topic of Environmental Justice with the content of this course.


Quantitative Economics Majors:

Discuss your math placement with your divisional advisor.

ECO 201H: Principles of Microeconomics- Honors
MWF 9:20am-10:15am, taught by Charles Moul
CRN 10742 3 credit hours
Course Description: Nature and scope of microeconomics, including the role of the market in resource allocation, the role of competition, market forces, the forces governing the distribution of income, and the role of foreign trade in economic welfare. While the only required math is basic algebra, the Honors sections make heavy and constant use of it to complement qualitative and graphical analysis. Students who have completed calculus (either by AP or at the college level) tend to manage this more easily, although it is not required to take the course. The business course surcharge is applied to first-time undergraduate students enrolled Fall 2021 or later.

MTH 151H: Calculus I
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Anna Ghazaryan
CRN 17064, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Topics include limits and continuity, derivatives and their applications, and early integration techniques of polynomial, rational, radical, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions. It is expected that students have completed a trigonometry or pre-calculus course and possess the following prerequisite knowledge: factoring polynomials, working with fractional exponents, finding the domain of functions, properties of common functions such as polynomial, absolute value, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and rational functions, solving a variety of types of equations, inverse functions, graphing, and other related topics.

MTH 222H: Introduction To Linear Algebra*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Ivonne Ortiz
CRN 17059, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Treatment with emphasis on Euclidean spaces and matrix algebra: systems of linear equations, elementary matrix operations, determinants, vector methods in geometry, vector spaces, and linear transformations.

MTH 251H: Calculus II*
MWF 2:50pm-4:05pm, taught by Alim Sukhtayev
CRN 18475. 4 credit hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I. Plane analytic geometry, techniques of integration, parametric equations, polar coordinates, infinite series, approximations, applications. Credit not awarded for both MTH 249 and 251. CAS-E. Prerequisite: a grade of C or better in MTH 151.

MTH 252H: Calculus III*
MWF 8:30am-9:45am, taught by Daniel Pritikin
CRN 17062, 4 Credit Hours
Course Description: Continuation of Calculus I and II. Three-dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, derivatives, multiple integrals, applications. The honors course offers an in-depth treatment of these topics.

College of Creative Arts

Architecture & Interior Design Majors:

ARC 221H: History of Architecture I*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Elizabeth Keslacy
CRN 12101, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Thorough and systematic survey of the history of architecture, urban design, and allied arts across global contexts. Enrollment in the honors course requires students to complete an honors project called "Designing History" in which students identify three lectures that particularly interested them, they propose to add one building not covered in class to each lecture, and they ultimately create the materials (slides and script) that would be used to lecture on those buildings. The course is often of interest to students who are curious about the built environment, and who want to know more about the connections between buildings and politics, religion, and culture. Students do well when they fully engage in course activities despite being unfamiliar with drawing diagrams or writing about buildings. This course is designed to impart these skills through practice, and those that complete the course always come around to appreciating those skills.

Architecture and Interior Design majors are also encouraged to explore Honors courses that fulfill Miami Plan 2023 PA-2A National Sciences, PA-2B Social Science, PA-4A DEI course, PA-4B Intercultural Consciousness, and/or PA-4C Global Inquiry requirements.


Art, Art History, and Communication Design Majors:

ART 188H: History Of West Art/Renaissance-Modern*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Andrew Casper
CRN 12608, 3 credit hours 
Course Description: Historical survey of Western art, including development of concepts necessary for analysis and appreciation of great works of art. Students in the honors section will be able to engage in close analysis and research of works of art at the Richard and Carole Cocks Art Museum on campus. This will provide opportunities for authentic learning involving real objects. 

Art and Art History majors are also encouraged to explore Honors courses that fulfill Miami Plan 2023 PA-1B Math & Formal Reasoning, PA-2A National Sciences, PA-2B Social Science, PA-3B Humanities, PA-4A DEI course, PA-4B Intercultural Consciousness, and/or PA-4C Global Inquiry requirements.


Art Education Majors:

ART 188H: History Of West Art/Renaissance-Modern*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Andrew Casper
CRN 12608, 3 credit hours 
Course Description: Historical survey of Western art, including development of concepts necessary for analysis and appreciation of great works of art. Students in the honors section will be able to engage in close analysis and research of works of art at the Richard and Carole Cocks Art Museum on campus. This will provide opportunities for authentic learning involving real objects. 

Art Education majors are also encouraged to explore Miami Plan 2023 PA-1B Math & Formal Reasoning, PA-2A National Sciences, PA-3B Humanities, PA-4A DEI course, PA-4B Intercultural Consciousness, and/or PA-4C Global Inquiry Honors courses.


Arts Management & Art Entrepreneurship Majors and Emerging Technology, Business + Design Majors:

Arts Management and Art Entrepreneurship, and Emerging Technology in Business + Design majors should consider Honors courses that fulfill Miami Plan 2023 PA-2A National Sciences, PA-2B Social Science, PA-3B Humanities, PA-4A DEI course, PA-4B Intercultural Consciousness, and/or PA-4C Global Inquiry requirements.


Games + Simulations Majors:

Games + Simulation majors should consider Honors courses that fulfill Miami Plan 2023 PA-2A National Sciences or PA-2B Social Science requirements. 


Music (BA & BM) Majors:

MUS 185H: The Diverse Worlds of Music*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Aaron Pergram
CRN 16531, 3 credit hours
Delivered via face-to-face & asynchronous online learning
Course description: An investigation of music as it exists in diverse areas around the world. The approach will be ethnomusicological, best defined as an exploration of music and its relationship to human culture.

Music, Music Performance, and Music Technology majors are also encouraged to explore Honors courses that fulfill Miami Plan 2023 PA-2A National Sciences, PA-2B Social Science, PA-3B Humanities, PA-4A DEI course, PA-4B Intercultural Consciousness, and/or PA-4C Global Inquiry requirements.


Music Education Majors:

MUS 185H: The Diverse Worlds of Music*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Aaron Pergram
CRN 16531, 3 credit hours
Delivered via face-to-face & asynchronous online learning
Course description: An investigation of music as it exists in diverse areas around the world. The approach will be ethnomusicological, best defined as an exploration of music and its relationship to human culture.

Music Education majors are also encouraged to explore Honors courses that fulfill Miami Plan 2023 PA-2A National Sciences, PA-3B Humanities, PA-4A DEI course, PA-4B Intercultural Consciousness, and/or PA-4C Global Inquiry requirements.


Theatre Majors:

Theatre majors should take an honors course that fulfills a Miami Plan 2023 requirement such as PA-2A National Sciences, PA-2B Social Science, PA-3B Humanities, PA-4A DEI course, PA-4B Intercultural Consciousness, and/or PA-4C Global Inquiry.

Theatre majors may also consider this PA-3B Humanities course:

ENG 125H: Introduction To Drama
TR 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Kathleen Johnson, CRN 18227, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course gives students an introduction to, and practice in, critical analysis of dramatic literature, from the ancient Greeks to modern Pulitzer-prize winning plays. Students will read plays such as Oedipus the King, Hamlet, The Hairy Ape, A Jury of Her Peers, Death of a Salesman, A Raisin in the Sun, Angels in America and more. Students will learn how drama is used to grapple with real-life crises and will consider the performative nature of drama by exploring how various plays get staged, re-staged, filmed, and revised over time. Students will examine the larger cultural contexts and historical relevance of producing and consuming.

College of Education, Health, and Society

Teacher Education Majors:

TCE 191H: Threshold Concepts of Teaching, Curriculum, and Educational Inquiry
MW 2:50pm-4:10pm, taught by Karen Zaino
CRN 19342, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course explores the purposes, organizations, and outcomes of schooling from the perspectives of the field of social foundations of education. Students undertake critical inquiry into teaching as a profession and examine threshold concepts related to teaching, curriculum, and educational inquiry. Students will explore historical, philosophical, and contemporary purposes of schooling in order to open up new possibilities for them as teachers and community members in a complex, multicultural society. The course challenges students to understand how historical and contextual issues related to schooling intersect with matters of diversity, equity, and inclusion. This examination centers issues related to schooling within the context of power, justice, and social change.


Kinesiology and Public Health Majors

KNH 188H: Physical Activity and Health*
TR 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Staff
CRN 14984, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Critical examination of relationships among exercise, physical activity, fitness, and health from epidemiological perspective. The role of genetic, sociocultural, economic, geographic and political influences on physical activity patterns, exercise habits, fitness and health are explored. A description of the physiological mechanisms that link physical activity and health are also examined

MBI 131H: Community Health Perspectives
MW 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Eileen Bridge
CRN 14024, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Discussion of community health primarily from the perspective of leading causes of disease and death in the U.S. Exploration of the impact of environment, behavior, and disease, including prevention and treatment strategies, on human health, public resources, and quality of life for society


Education Studies Majors:

Discuss Following Courses with Departmental Advisor:

CCA 111H: Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking
2 sections at different times, taught by J. Tyler Friedman
CRN 15092, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course will explore the roots of original thought and it's role in the evolution of different areas of human endeavor. Students will explore the many facets of creativity and innovation, which are purely human traits at the heart of our ability to grow, change and adapt as individuals, and ultimately to survive as a species. The course will present scientific and scholarly ways of understanding creativity, but will also engage students in a series of exercises to experience processes through a diverse range of media and project types. Learning the roles and processes of innovation and design thinking will be central to this exploration. Team work, problem-solving and leadership skills will also be addressed, and students will both self-author and collaboratively author original concepts.

MUS 185H: The Diverse Worlds of Music*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Aaron Pergram
CRN 16531, 3 credit hours
Delivered via face-to-face & asynchronous online learning
Course description: An investigation of music as it exists in diverse areas around the world. The approach will be ethnomusicological, best defined as an exploration of music and its relationship to human culture.

AAA/REL 203H: Religions of India
WF 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Elizabeth Wilson
2 sections, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: How can adherents of selected Asian religions (Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism) best be accommodated in American schools, hospitals, and corporate workplaces? What does a future teacher, medical professional, or business person need to know to meet the needs of patrons who practice Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism? The class will focus on three workplaces and three religions. In this experiential learning class, you’ll visit a Hindu temple, a Muslim mosque, and a Sikh temple. You’ll conduct interviews with Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs who work in vocational settings such as schools, hospitals, and corporations.  Students will select one workplace and one religion as their research focus. This course is ideal for students training for medical careers, K-12 educational careers, and careers in business.


Sport Management Majors:

ECO 201H: Principles of Microeconomics- Honors
MWF 9:20am-10:15am, taught by Charles Moul
CRN 10742 3 credit hours
Course Description: Nature and scope of microeconomics, including the role of the market in resource allocation, the role of competition, market forces, the forces governing the distribution of income, and the role of foreign trade in economic welfare. While the only required math is basic algebra, the Honors sections make heavy and constant use of it to complement qualitative and graphical analysis. Students who have completed calculus (either by AP or at the college level) tend to manage this more easily, although it is not required to take the course. The business course surcharge is applied to first-time undergraduate students enrolled Fall 2021 or later.

College of Engineering and Computing

CEC 111H: Imagination, Ingenuity and Impact I*
Multiple sections with different meeting times, taught by Staff, 2 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course is for first-year students interested in exploring engineering and computing. Students engage in hands-on, interdisciplinary design that addresses societal and environmental challenges. Students work in teams to design innovative solutions and develop communications skills. The course facilitates student transition to college by introducing key information, resources, and skills needed to succeed. It addresses issues including information literacy, academic integrity, personal responsibility and career development; and identifies key campus resources to enhance academic success.

Students with majors in the College of Engineering and Computing will be enrolled in this course prior to Orientation.

Students who need to explore an alternative Honors course instead of CEC 111H should consult with an Honors advisor at Orientation.

Farmer School of Business

Business Economics Majors:

ECO 201H: Principles Of Microeconomics-Honors
MWF 9:20am-10:15am, taught by Charles Moul
CRN 10742 3 credit hours
Course Description: Nature and scope of microeconomics, including the role of the market in resource allocation, the role of competition, market forces, the forces governing the distribution of income, and the role of foreign trade in economic welfare. While the only required math is basic algebra, the Honors sections make heavy and constant use of it to complement qualitative and graphical analysis. Students who have completed calculus (either by AP or at the college level) tend to manage this more easily, although it is not required to take the course. The business course surcharge is applied to first-time undergraduate students enrolled Fall 2021 or later.

All Farmer School of Business majors:

You are encouraged to consider the following course or select a Miami Plan course from the following: Perspectives Area 2A: Natural Sciences; Perspectives Area 3: Arts & Humanities; Perspectives Area 4: Global Citizenship; or a Signature Inquiry course.

AAA/REL 203H: Religions of India
WF 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Elizabeth Wilson
2 sections, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: How can adherents of selected Asian religions (Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism) best be accommodated in American schools, hospitals, and corporate workplaces? What does a future teacher, medical professional, or business person need to know to meet the needs of patrons who practice Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism? The class will focus on three workplaces and three religions. In this experiential learning class, you’ll visit a Hindu temple, a Muslim mosque, and a Sikh temple. You’ll conduct interviews with Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs who work in vocational settings such as schools, hospitals, and corporations.  Students will select one workplace and one religion as their research focus. This course is ideal for students training for medical careers, K-12 educational careers, and careers in business.

ACC 221H: Intro To Financial Accounting  
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Michele Frank
CRN 18866, 3 credit hours
Course description: Introduction to the purposes of financial statements and the recognition, measurement, and disclosure concepts and methods underlying financial statements. Focus is on preparing, using and interpreting financial statements and on understanding the impact of transactions and events on financial statements and financial ratios. Recommended for Accounting, Finance or FSB Undeclared majors, however, any FSB student could consider this course. Discuss this course with your divisional advisor.

College of Liberal Arts and Applied Science

Nursing Majors

Select a Miami Plan course from the following: Perspectives Area 1: Formal Reasoning & Communication; Perspectives Area 3: Arts & Humanities; Perspectives Area 4: Global Citizenship; or a Signature Inquiry course.

Miami Plan Areas:

Perspective Area 1B: Math & Formal Reasoning

MTH 135H: Math for Science Applications*
2 sections with different meeting times, taught by Olga Brezhneva, 3 credit hours
Course description: Taught at the precalculus level, the course focuses on concepts and examples from chemistry, physics, and biology to give students practice with problems they will encounter in natural science courses. Being multidisciplinary by nature, the course prepares students knowledge and skills to tackle real-world problems and for analysis of global issues such as climate and temperature changes, spread of infectious diseases, and drinking water availability. Enhanced with MCAT practice problems, the course also gives additional motivation for students interested in premedical studies.

Perspective Area 2A: Natural Science

GLG 111H: The Dynamic Earth
MW 2:50pm-4:10pm, taught by Maija Sipola
CRN 14958, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Earth as a geophysical-geochemical unit and its internal and external processes. Formation of minerals and their relationships in rocks. Earth stresses and rock deformation, mountain building, and earthquakes. Geomorphic (landscape) evolution by mass wasting and wave, stream, wind, ground water, glacial, and volcanic activity.

MBI 131H: Community Health Perspectives
MW 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Eileen Bridge
CRN 14024, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Discussion of community health primarily from the perspective of leading causes of disease and death in the U.S. Exploration of the impact of environment, behavior, and disease, including prevention and treatment strategies, on human health, public resources, and quality of life for society

Perspective Area 2B: Social Science

ATH 180: Apes Behavior and Conservation
MW 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Kelsey Ellis
CRN 18634, 3 Credit Hours
This course offers an introduction to the biology, behavior, culture, and conservation of great apes around the world. Through a comparative lens, and using examples from both captive and wild populations, students will explore behavioral similarities and differences among the great apes (and ourselves). Importantly, students will examine the biological, anthropogenic, and abiotic threats facing great apes today, and the ecosystems in which they live, and discuss the conservation strategies used to combat those threats and increase their chances of survival.

ATH 185H: Cultural Diversity in the US
TR 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by staff
CRN 18906, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Anthropological and ethnographic approaches to the study of cultural, social, and linguistic variation in the United States, its territories, and borderlands. As an introduction to cultural anthropology, the course provides a foundation for understanding historical and contemporary contexts related to globalization and diaspora; ethnic, racial, and class identities; political economy and environment; belief systems; and ethnographic methodology.

ECO 201H: Prin Of Microeconomics-Honors
MWF 9:20am-10:15am, taught by Charles Moul
CRN 10742 3 credit hours
Course Description: Nature and scope of microeconomics, including the role of the market in resource allocation, the role of competition, market forces, the forces governing the distribution of income, and the role of foreign trade in economic welfare. While the only required math is basic algebra, the Honors sections make heavy and constant use of it to complement qualitative and graphical analysis. Students who have completed calculus (either by AP or at the college level) tend to manage this more easily, although it is not required to take the course. The business course surcharge is applied to first-time undergraduate students enrolled Fall 2021 or later.

POL 221H: Comparative Politics
TR 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Venelin Ganev
CRN 18419, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Comparative introduction to the development, governmental structures, and political processes of societies in modern world. Case studies used to relate theories to actual problems and governing strategies in contemporary political systems. Students in the honors section read important texts that are not assigned in the non-Honors version of the course, receive detailed feedback on their written assignments, and participate in more and lengthier class discussions.

KNH 188H: Physical Activity and Health*
TR 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Staff
CRN 14984, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Critical examination of relationships among exercise, physical activity, fitness, and health from epidemiological perspective. The role of genetic, sociocultural, economic, geographic and political influences on physical activity patterns, exercise habits, fitness and health are explored. A description of the physiological mechanisms that link physical activity and health are also examined

Perspective Area 3A: Creative Arts

ARC 221H: History of Architecture I*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Elizabeth Keslacy
CRN 12101, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Thorough and systematic survey of the history of architecture, urban design, and allied arts across global contexts. Enrollment in the honors course requires students to complete an honors project called "Designing History" in which students identify three lectures that particularly interested them, they propose to add one building not covered in class to each lecture, and they ultimately create the materials (slides and script) that would be used to lecture on those buildings. The course is often of interest to students who are curious about the built environment, and who want to know more about the connections between buildings and politics, religion, and culture. Students do well when they fully engage in course activities despite being unfamiliar with drawing diagrams or writing about buildings. This course is designed to impart these skills through practice, and those that complete the course always come around to appreciating those skills.

ART 188H: History Of West Art/Renaissance-Modern*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Andrew Casper
CRN 12608, 3 credit hours 
Course Description: Historical survey of Western art, including development of concepts necessary for analysis and appreciation of great works of art. Students in the honors section will be able to engage in close analysis and research of works of art at the Richard and Carole Cocks Art Museum on campus. This will provide opportunities for authentic learning involving real objects. 

CCA 111H: Innovation, Creativity and Design Thinking
2 sections with different meeting times, taught by J. Tyler Friedman, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course will explore the roots of original thought and it's role in the evolution of different areas of human endeavor. Students will explore the many facets of creativity and innovation, which are purely human traits at the heart of our ability to grow, change and adapt as individuals, and ultimately to survive as a species. The course will present scientific and scholarly ways of understanding creativity, but will also engage students in a series of exercises to experience processes through a diverse range of media and project types. Learning the roles and processes of innovation and design thinking will be central to this exploration. Team work, problem-solving and leadership skills will also be addressed, and students will both self-author and collaboratively author original concepts.

Perspective Area 3B: Humanities

AAA/REL 203H: Religions of India
WF 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Elizabeth Wilson
2 sections, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: How can adherents of selected Asian religions (Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism) best be accommodated in American schools, hospitals, and corporate workplaces? What does a future teacher, medical professional, or business person need to know to meet the needs of patrons who practice Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism? The class will focus on three workplaces and three religions. In this experiential learning class, you’ll visit a Hindu temple, a Muslim mosque, and a Sikh temple. You’ll conduct interviews with Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs who work in vocational settings such as schools, hospitals, and corporations.  Students will select one workplace and one religion as their research focus. This course is ideal for students training for medical careers, K-12 educational careers, and careers in business.

AMS 205H: Intro to American Studies
WF 11:40am-1:00pm, taught by Kathleen Kollman,
CRN 18372, 3 Credit Hours
Course description: Explores what it means to be "American." As an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and identities, past and present, it examines key ideas, events, texts, images, objects, places, and other reflections of American cultures and identities. Students will consider how the meaning and significance of American and American identity has been defined, discussed and debated from multiple perspectives. The honors section will explore the breadth of American studies but with a special topic emphasis on indigenous identities, Native tribal sovereignty, and in particular historical and contemporary indigenous cultures in the greater Miami Valley region as well as representations of Native identity in popular culture.

ARC 221H: History of Architecture I*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Elizabeth Keslacy,
CRN 12101, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Thorough and systematic survey of the history of architecture, urban design, and allied arts across global contexts. Enrollment in the honors course requires students to complete an honors project called "Designing History" in which students identify three lectures that particularly interested them, they propose to add one building not covered in class to each lecture, and they ultimately create the materials (slides and script) that would be used to lecture on those buildings. The course is often of interest to students who are curious about the built environment, and who want to know more about the connections between buildings and politics, religion, and culture. Students do well when they fully engage in course activities despite being unfamiliar with drawing diagrams or writing about buildings. This course is designed to impart these skills through practice, and those that complete the course always come around to appreciating those skills.

ENG 125H: Introduction To Drama
TR 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Kathleen Johnson,
CRN 18227, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course gives students an introduction to, and practice in, critical analysis of dramatic literature, from the ancient Greeks to modern Pulitzer-prize winning plays. Students will read plays such as Oedipus the King, Hamlet, The Hairy Ape, A Jury of Her Peers, Death of a Salesman, A Raisin in the Sun, Angels in America and more. Students will learn how drama is used to grapple with real-life crises and will consider the performative nature of drama by exploring how various plays get staged, re-staged, filmed, and revised over time. Students will examine the larger cultural contexts and historical relevance of producing and consuming drama. Students will also actively engage drama texts through small group work, discussions (online and in-class), creative projects, and writing assignments.

FST 201H: Film History and Analysis
MW|T 11:40am-1:00pm|5:00pm-7:00pm, taught by Kerry Hegarty
CRN 16974, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Introduction to basic principles of cinematic form and to major movements and issues in the history of cinema. Primary emphasis given to principal methods of critical thinking in film studies, from close analysis of formal and stylistic elements in a single film to more global ways of understanding and interpreting films within their aesthetic, social, historical, and political contexts. Includes screenings of representative films, lectures, discussions, group activities, papers, and exams.

PHL 103H: Society and the Individual*
MW 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Christopher King
CRN 17126, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: A study of the relationship between human beings and the societies in which they live and of the implications different perspectives on this relationship have for a view of social justice. We investigate this relation in terms of its political, economic, social, ethical, and epistemological dimensions. Introduces fundamental questions of philosophy and basic reasoning skills, methodologies, and concepts used by philosophers. Students are prepared for further work in philosophy and develop skills in critical thinking, reading, and writing for any area of learning.

SPN 315H: Intro to Hispanic Literatures*
TR 11:40am-1:00pm, taught by Luis Pradanos-Garcia
CRN 18587, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Close reading and critical analysis of selected poetry, essay, narrative fiction, and drama from Spain and Latin America. The Honors version of the course will connect presentations organized by the Humanities Center Altman Program on the topic of Environmental Justice with the content of this course.

Perspective Area 4A: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion

AMS 205H: Intro to American Studies
WF 11:40am-1:00pm, taught by Kathleen Kollman
CRN 18372, 3 Credit Hours
Course description: Explores what it means to be "American." As an introduction to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures and identities, past and present, it examines key ideas, events, texts, images, objects, places, and other reflections of American cultures and identities. Students will consider how the meaning and significance of American and American identity has been defined, discussed and debated from multiple perspectives. The honors section will explore the breadth of American studies but with a special topic emphasis on indigenous identities, Native tribal sovereignty, and in particular historical and contemporary indigenous cultures in the greater Miami Valley region as well as representations of Native identity in popular culture.

ATH 185H: Cultural Diversity in the US
TR 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by staff
CRN 18906, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Anthropological and ethnographic approaches to the study of cultural, social, and linguistic variation in the United States, its territories, and borderlands. As an introduction to cultural anthropology, the course provides a foundation for understanding historical and contemporary contexts related to globalization and diaspora; ethnic, racial, and class identities; political economy and environment; belief systems; and ethnographic methodology.

Perspective Area 4B: Intercultural Consciousness

AAA/REL 203H: Religions of India
WF 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by Elizabeth Wilson
2 sections, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: How can adherents of selected Asian religions (Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism) best be accommodated in American schools, hospitals, and corporate workplaces? What does a future teacher, medical professional, or business person need to know to meet the needs of patrons who practice Islam, Hinduism, and Sikhism? The class will focus on three workplaces and three religions. In this experiential learning class, you’ll visit a Hindu temple, a Muslim mosque, and a Sikh temple. You’ll conduct interviews with Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs who work in vocational settings such as schools, hospitals, and corporations.  Students will select one workplace and one religion as their research focus. This course is ideal for students training for medical careers, K-12 educational careers, and careers in business.

ART 188H: History Of West Art/Renaissance-Modern*
MWF 10:05am-11:00am, taught by Andrew Casper
CRN 12608, 3 credit hours 
Course Description: Historical survey of Western art, including development of concepts necessary for analysis and appreciation of great works of art. Students in the honors section will be able to engage in close analysis and research of works of art at the Richard and Carole Cocks Art Museum on campus. This will provide opportunities for authentic learning involving real objects. 

MUS 185H: The Diverse Worlds of Music*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Aaron Pergram
CRN 16531, 3 credit hours
Delivered via face-to-face & asynchronous online learning
Course description: An investigation of music as it exists in diverse areas around the world. The approach will be ethnomusicological, best defined as an exploration of music and its relationship to human culture.

Perspective Area 4C: Global Inquiry

ATH 180: Apes Behavior and Conservation
MW 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Kelsey Ellis
CRN 18634, 3 Credit Hours
This course offers an introduction to the biology, behavior, culture, and conservation of great apes around the world. Through a comparative lens, and using examples from both captive and wild populations, students will explore behavioral similarities and differences among the great apes (and ourselves). Importantly, students will examine the biological, anthropogenic, and abiotic threats facing great apes today, and the ecosystems in which they live, and discuss the conservation strategies used to combat those threats and increase their chances of survival.

CEC 266H: Engineering Global Heavy Metal*
MWF 1:15pm-2:10pm, taught by Brian Kirkmeyer
CRN 13097, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: This course addresses the linkages among heavy metal music, global culture and engineering developments. Heavy metal is a truly global popular music with major impacts from Europe, Asia, the Americas and beyond. Advances in various technologies have extensively influenced heavy metal, enabling some of its most defining characteristics. This course explores the interplays of technology, music and culture by integrating the powerful history of metal with an overview of the engineering impacts. Students will engage in demonstrations and discussions of the musical breadth along with the engineering technologies.

Signature Inquiry Courses

ATH 180: Apes Behavior and Conservation
MW 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Kelsey Ellis
CRN 18634, 3 Credit Hours
This course offers an introduction to the biology, behavior, culture, and conservation of great apes around the world. Through a comparative lens, and using examples from both captive and wild populations, students will explore behavioral similarities and differences among the great apes (and ourselves). Importantly, students will examine the biological, anthropogenic, and abiotic threats facing great apes today, and the ecosystems in which they live, and discuss the conservation strategies used to combat those threats and increase their chances of survival.

ATH 185H: Cultural Diversity in the US
TR 1:15pm-2:35pm, taught by staff
CRN 18906, 3 Credit Hours
Course Description: Anthropological and ethnographic approaches to the study of cultural, social, and linguistic variation in the United States, its territories, and borderlands. As an introduction to cultural anthropology, the course provides a foundation for understanding historical and contemporary contexts related to globalization and diaspora; ethnic, racial, and class identities; political economy and environment; belief systems; and ethnographic methodology.

MTH 135H: Math for Science Applications*
2 sections with different meeting times, taught by Olga Brezhneva, 3 credit hours
Course description: Taught at the precalculus level, the course focuses on concepts and examples from chemistry, physics, and biology to give students practice with problems they will encounter in natural science courses. Being multidisciplinary by nature, the course prepares students knowledge and skills to tackle real-world problems and for analysis of global issues such as climate and temperature changes, spread of infectious diseases, and drinking water availability. Enhanced with MCAT practice problems, the course also gives additional motivation for students interested in premedical studies.

MUS 185H: The Diverse Worlds of Music*
TR 8:30am-9:50am, taught by Aaron Pergram
CRN 16531, 3 credit hours
Delivered via face-to-face & asynchronous online learning
Course description: An investigation of music as it exists in diverse areas around the world. The approach will be ethnomusicological, best defined as an exploration of music and its relationship to human culture.

Foreign Language Courses

RUS101H: Beginner's Course* 
Two sections, taught by Brendan Mooney
4 credit hours 
Course description: Essentials of Russian language including rudiments of grammar, acquisition of a simple vocabulary, practice in reading and conversation, and simple written exercises.

SPN 311H: Grammar Review and Introductory Composition* 
WF 10:05am-11:25am, taught by Katherine Fowler-Cordova
CRN 18586, 3 credit hours
Course Description: Continued development of basic grammatical proficiency in Spanish with an introduction to the fundamentals of writing in the Spanish language.
Prerequisite: SPN 202, SPN 203, SPN 211 or appropriate placement exam score

This is the first course in the Spanish Major or Minor. Students enrolled in the Honors section will be responsible for leading discussions and presenting to the class about the events that they have attended that related to topics examined in the class. 

SPN 315H: Intro to Hispanic Literatures* 
TR 11:40am-1:00pm, taught by Luis Pradanos-Garcia
CRN 18587, 3 credit hours 
Course Description: Close reading and critical analysis of selected poetry, essay, narrative fiction, and drama from Spain and Latin America. The Honors version of the course will connect presentations organized by the Humanities Center Altman Program on the topic of Environmental Justice with the content of this course.
Prerequisite: SPN 311.

Honors College

Peabody Hall
701 Western College Drive
Oxford, OH 45056