Lecture Capture Strategies for Distance Learning

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Strategies for Complying with FERPA Guidelines Related to Lecture Capture for Distance Learning

Many faculty are choosing to record their remotely-delivered live lectures and class sessions as an alternative or supplement to in-class instruction and learning, providing students who were unable to attend live or in-person an opportunity to engage with the content and continue making academic progress.

As stated by Miami’s Office of General Counsel, “The rights and responsibilities involved in any Lecture Capture will depend on such things as the audience (both at the recording and those viewing the recording thereafter), the content being recorded, and the ownership of the content being recorded.” Reference COVID-19 | Lecture Capture for details regarding Miami’s guidelines related to the use of Lecture Capture to deliver content as an alternative or supplement to face-to-face learning.


Live (Synchronous) Lecture Capture      |      Asynchronous Lecture Capture



Live (Synchronous) Lecture Capture

Considerations for Lecture Capture via Recording Live Web Conferencing Sessions

Before you press “Record,” work through the following considerations to ensure you are setting up the recording in a way that complies with FERPA-protected student information.

  • Determine what needs to be recorded for playback - For example, it may be that there’s a specific 10-minute portion of the lecture that students who can’t attend will need to watch. In that scenario, you may wish to start the session with the 10 minutes that need to be recorded so that you can stop the recording and proceed with the rest of your class plans. For scenarios such as this:
    • Determine which part(s) of the live session will need to be recorded and made available to students who couldn't’t attend the live session or who wish to review the session again.
    • Organize your class plans in such a way that makes it easier for you to record the needed content and turn off the recording function for the portions that aren’t needed.
  • Inform students about your lecture capture policies - If you haven’t already included syllabus language pertaining to lecture capture and recording in your class, you will want to amend your syllabus and post an Announcement to the course informing students that regularly scheduled classroom recordings are planned for the course and off-camera seating will be made available for students who do not wish to be recorded.
  • Announce that the recorded session is starting - Always tell students you are recording the session at the beginning and before you start recording.

Complying with Guidelines for Protecting Student Information during Lecture Capture via Recording Live Web Conferencing Sessions

Recorded live lecture capture content that includes only instructor-shared content (e.g., showing the instructor and/or presentation content) and does not contain recorded student participation or interactions (e.g., participant video) will not create FERPA concerns.

There are times when instruction and learning is student-driven in which student engagement and participation is at the core of the lesson. In these scenarios, if the recorded live session includes audio or video of any student interactions (e.g., students asking questions, making presentations, group discussions, etc.), or if it is possible to identify students through the subject matter of the recording, the recorded content likely constitutes protected educational records under FERPA.

With whom you intend to share the recordings dictates to what extent you must take precautions and efforts to protect student information and educational records in compliance with FERPA regulations.

Option 1: Sharing Recorded Lecture Capture that Includes Only Instructor-shared Content

Recorded live lecture capture content that includes only instructor-shared content (e.g., showing the instructor and/or presentation content) and does not contain recorded student participation or interactions (e.g., participant video) will not create FERPA concerns.

To comply with FERPA regulations in this scenario:

There are no additional precautions or steps you need to take to protect student information and educational records in compliance with FERPA regulations because no student information or records are being shared.

Option 2: Sharing Recorded Lecture Capture that Includes Audio/Video of Student Participant Interactions with Students in the Same Section of the Course

There are times when instruction and learning are student-driven in which student engagement and participation are at the core of the lesson. Examples include students asking questions; students giving presentations; group discussions; and, student-led class sessions. In these scenarios, when the recorded live session includes audio or video of any student interactions, or if it is possible to identify students through the subject matter of the recording, the recorded content likely constitutes protected educational records under FERPA.

To comply with FERPA regulations in this scenario:

In general, these scenarios are treated the same as similar scenarios would play out on campus in the classroom. On campus, you can monitor and limit who comes in and out of the classroom. You can do this online, too, by enabling a password requirement. Furthermore, lecture capture that includes student interactions should be shared only with students who are enrolled in the course and should only be shared through the designated Canvas course site. For these three reasons (password, limited audience, and sharing through the LMS), it is highly recommended that all course web conferencing sessions arranged for the remote delivery of instruction are scheduled in Canvas using either the Zoom or the Cisco Webex integrations.

Beyond these three guidelines, there are no additional precautions or steps you need to take to protect student information and educational records in compliance with FERPA regulations so long as you are sharing the recorded content with only the students enrolled in the course.

Option 3: Sharing Recorded Lecture Capture that Includes Audio/Video of Student Participant Interactions with Students in Different Sections of the Same Course that have been Cross-listed in Canvas

Some instructors have cross-listed multiple sections of the same course into a single Canvas course site. Cross-listed sections of the same course taught by the same instructor may now be treated as a single course, in terms of FERPA protected information. Because of this, protecting information shared between the different sections requires no additional precautions beyond what you would do for a single course section.

To comply with FERPA regulations in this scenario:

In general, these scenarios are treated the same as similar scenarios would play out on campus in the classroom. On campus, you can monitor and limit who comes in and out of the classroom. You can do this online, too, by enabling a password requirement. Furthermore, lecture capture that includes student interactions should be shared only with students who are enrolled in the course and should only be shared through the designated Canvas course site. For these three reasons (password, limited audience, and sharing through the LMS), it is highly recommended that all course web conferencing sessions arranged for the remote delivery of instruction are scheduled in Canvas using either the Zoom or the Cisco Webex integrations.

Beyond these three guidelines, there are no additional precautions or steps you need to take to protect student information and educational records in compliance with FERPA regulations so long as you are sharing the recorded content with only the students enrolled in your cross-listed Canvas course site.

Special Note: While the FERPA-related strategies are the same, managing web conferencing meetings across multiple sections in a single Canvas course site requires additional planning and communication. You will want to set up the meetings in a way that makes it easy for the students to identify which session is theirs. For example, you may want to title each class meeting with the specific section, date, and time. e.g., ENG 111 HA Class Session Th 10:05 - 11:25a

Option 4: Sharing Recorded Lecture Capture that Includes Audio/Video of Student Participant Interactions with Persons Outside of the Course

According to the Office of General Counsel’s guidelines: “If an instructor wishes to reuse or share Lecture Capture Content containing FERPA protected education records with Miami students other than those who were enrolled in particular course section in which the recording was made, the instructor must first obtain the permission of his or her department chair and must obtain a signed consent from each student in the recorded course setting forth with specificity how the Lecture Capture Content will be used and the outside audience to whom it will be presented. The instructor shall retain such consents for as long as such Lecture Capture Content is made available. If a FERPA consent cannot be obtained for a student, then prior to sharing any Lecture Capture Content including the non-consenting student, the recording must be edited to either omit such student or otherwise de-identify such student. Note that a FERPA consent will need to be obtained from the parents or guardians of any high school student enrolled in a College Credit Plus course if such person is under 18 years of age.”

Reference COVID-19 | Lecture Capture for details regarding Miami’s guidelines related to the use of Lecture Capture to deliver content as an alternative or supplement to face-to-face learning.


Live (Synchronous) Lecture Capture Resources

Zoom

How to Record and Share a Web Conference Session that Includes Only Instructor-Shared Content in Zoom

By default, all Zoom conferences will automatically have a passcode assigned.

First, log into miamioh.zoom.us and change your meeting settings. These are the recommended settings for recording:

  • Cloud recording
    • Allow hosts to record and save the meeting/webinar in the cloud.
    • Record active speaker with shared screen.
  • Advanced cloud recording settings
    • Add a timestamp to the recording.

Turn on the following options for recording in Zoom to help you maximize the privacy of your recordings.

  • Recording disclaimer
    • Show a customizable disclaimer to participants before a recording starts.
  • Multiple audio notifications of recorded meeting
    • Play notification messages to participants who join the meeting audio. These messages play each time the recording starts or restarts, informing participants that the meeting is being recorded. If participants join the audio from telephone, even if this option is disabled, users will hear one notification message per meeting.

Then, start the meeting and click record, unless you have set the recording to start automatically.

To start the meeting from miamioh.zoom.us:

  1. Go to miamioh.zoom.us and click Meeting on the left navigation.
  2. Locate the meeting and click on the title.
  3. Start the meeting.

To start the meeting from Canvas:

  1. Go to Zoom in the course navigation.
  2. Click on the Upcoming Meetings. The meeting will open in the Zoom desktop client (if installed, which is recommended), or in your web browser.
  3. Start the meeting (click record if you did not set auto recording).

For more information, see these Zoom guides:

Share the recorded session in Canvas:

Recorded sessions created and started in Canvas will appear in Zoom on the Cloud Recordings tab for students to view. Sessions created and started outside of Canvas from the Zoom app or browser will require downloading or sharing from miamioh.zoom.us:

  • Go to miamioh.zoom.us
  • Click on Recordings on the left navigation menu
  • Locate the recording and use the Share or More buttons to make the recording available
    • Share displays the recording link information and sharing settings, such as disabling downloads from viewers and requiring a password to view.
    • The More > Download option will download both the video and audio-only m4a files.

Upload the mp4 file to Canvas using My Media (Kaltura). Media should not be placed in Files or added to the course using the Canvas feature "record/upload media". My Media has no size limits or storage issues; Canvas course storage is 1GB per course.

Captions will be automatically created and can be edited.

Students cannot download media from the course.


Webex

How to Record and Share a Web Conference Session in Cisco Webex

Before you schedule or start a recorded meeting, change the Webex screen layout to record the correct view.

To download and share a recorded Webex from the browser:

If you scheduled and started the meeting outside of Canvas in the browser, you will need to download the file from miamioh.webex.com, then upload it to My Media in Canvas.

  • Click on "Recordings" on the left navigation at miamioh.webex.com
  • Locate the recording, then click the down arrow to download the mp4 file.

Upload the mp4 file to Canvas using My Media (Kaltura). Media should not be placed in Files or added to the course using the Canvas feature "record/upload media". My Media has no size limits or storage issues; Canvas course storage is 1GB per course.

Captions will be automatically created and can be edited.

Students cannot download media from the course.

To view a recorded Cisco Webex session in Canvas:

  • In Canvas, go to Cisco Webex in the course navigation.
  • Select the Virtual Meetings tab.
  • Then, click on the Recordings tab.
  • Click the View Recording button.



Asynchronous Lecture Capture

Beyond Live Lecture Capture: Taking instruction and content engagement to the next level

Recording live sessions is a quick and easy way to capture what happened during a meeting for those who missed it or who may want to review the content again. However, it isn’t always the most effective way to provide that content for those not in attendance or who want to review the content again. There are things that happen “live” that are only relevant and contextual ‘in the moment’ and do not translate the same way during playback. As an alternative, you may want to consider offering an alternative learning activity, assessment, or media for those not in attendance or who wish to review the content again.

Some alternative options include:

  • Creating a summative lecture-only recording that focuses on the key ideas, essential content, and takeaways (e.g., Supplemental “lecture” that you record). BONUS: This is a valuable resource for all students in the class, even those who were able to attend the live session.
  • Compose a “Study Guide” or summary style document that provides a high level overview of the key ideas, essential content, and takeaways presented during the live session. Also, a valuable resource for all students in the class, even those who were able to attend the live session.
  • Providing links to videos from alternative and/or external sources presenting the same learning concepts (e.g., YouTube, Khan Academy, TedX, Library, etc.)
  • Providing links to simulations and/or interactive media providing learning opportunities to engage with the same learning concepts.
  • Sourcing readings or other alternative sources that cover the same learning concepts
  • Assigning projects that are authentic and have students apply the knowledge from readings and pre-recorded lectures and resources

Asynchronous Lecture Capture Resources

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